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February 19151 $2.<* 







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tempo 
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again 

THE WORLD'S FIRST 
440 MHz SYNTHESIZED 

HAND HELD RADIO 



Tempo was the first with a synthesized 
hand held for amateur use t first with a 
220 MHz synthesized hand held, first 
with a 5 watt output synthesized hand 
held and once again first in the 440 
MHz range with the S-4, a fully 
synthesized hand held radio. Not only 
does Tempo offer the broadest line of 
synthesized hand helds. but its 
standards of reliability are 
unsurpassed .reliability proven 
through millions of hours of operation. 
No other hand held has been so 



thoroughly field tested, is so simple to 
operate or offers so much value. The 
Tempo S-4 offers the opportunity to 
get on 440 MHz from where ever you 
may be, With the addition of a touch 
tone pad and matching power 
amplifier its versatility is also 
unsurpassed, 
The S-4... $349,00 

With 12 button touch tone pad...S399.00 
With 16 button touch tone pad... S4 19.00 
S-40 matching 40 watt output 
13.8 VDC power amplifier ..S149.00 




Tempo S-l 

The first and most thoroughly field tested hand held 
synthesized radio available today Many thousands 
are now in use and the letters of praise still pour in. 
The 3-1 is the most simple radio to operate and is 
built to provide years ot dependable service 
Despite its light weight and small size it is built to 
withstand rough handling and hard use, tt$ heavy 
duty battery pack allows more operating time 
between charges and its new lower price makes it 
even more affordable. 

Tempo S-5 

Offers the same field proven reliability, features and 
specifications as the S-1 except that the S-5 
provides a big 5 watt output (or 1 watt low power 
operation) They both have externaf microphone 
capability and can be operated with matching solid 
state power amplifiers (30 watt or 60 watt output) 
Allows your hand held to double as a powerful 
mobile or base radio, 

S-30. $89.00* 5^80. $149 00* 

* For use with S-t and S-5 

Tempo S-2 

With an S-2 in your car or pocket you can use 
220 MHz repeaters throughout the U.S It 
offers all the advanced engineering, premium 
quality components and features of the S-1 
and S-5, The S-2 offers 1000 channels in an 
extremely lightweight but rugged case. 
If you're not on 220 this is the perfect way to 
get started. With the addition of the 3-20 
Tempo solid state amplifier it becomes a 
powerful mobile or base station. If you have a 
220 MHz station, the S-2 will add tremendous versatility 
Price...$349.00 (With touch tone pad installed. ..$399.00) 
S-20„.$B9.00 





Specifications: 

Frequency Coverage: 440 to 449,995 MHz 

Channel Spacing; 25 KHz minimum 

Power Requirements: 9.6 VDC 

Current Drain: 17 ma-standby 400 ma-transmit (1 amp high power) 

Antenna Impedance: 50 ohms 

Sensitivity: Better than .5 microvolts nominal for 20 db 

Supplied Accessories: Rubber flex antenna 450 ma ni-cad battery 

pack, charger and earphone 
RF output Power: Nominal 3 watts high or 1 watt tow power 
Repeater Offset: ± 5 MHz 

Optional Accessories for all models 

12 button touch tone pad (not installed): $39 * 16 button touch 
tone pad (not installed): S48 • Tone burst generator $29 95 
* CTCSS sub-audible tone control: 529.95 • Leather holster: 
S20 * Cigarette lighter plug mobile ehargrng unit $6 

TEMPO VHF & UHF SOLID STATI POWER AMPLIFIERS 

Boost your signal, . * give ft the range and clarity of a high 
powered base station VHf- (135 to 175 MHz) 




Drive Power 


Output 


Model No 


Price 


2W 


130W 


l3fJA02 


S209 


tow 


T30W 


130A1Q 


$189 


30W 


130W 


13OA30 


SI 99 


2W 


sow 


80A02 


S169 


10W 


SOW 


8GA10 


$149 


30W 


eow 


S0A30 


SI 59 


2W 


sow 


50A02 


St 29 


2W 


sow 


30A02 


S 89 



UHF (400 lo 512 MHr) models, lower power and FCC WP* accepted models 

also available. 



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^S*»3%Sr*« phone 



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931 N Euclid. Anaheim. CA 92801 714 772-9200 

Butler, Missouri 64730 (816) 679-3127 

TOLL FREE ORDER NUMBER: (8001 421 8631 

For all stales except California 

Calit residents please call collect on our regular numbers 

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SUPERIOR 

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INTRODUCTORY OFFER 

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COMPARE THESE FEATURES WITH ANYuNITAT ANYPRICE 



• 8 MHZ FREQUENCY COVERAGE, INCLUDING CAP/MARS BUILT IN: Re- 
ceive and iransmit 142,000 to 149,995 MHz in selectable steps or 5 or r0 kHz. 

tOMPARE! 
IZE: Unbelievable 1 Only 6*4 " by 2*%' by 9 1 * COMPARE! 

* MICROCOMPUTER CONTROL; AIJ frequency control »s earned out by a 
micro computer, 

- MUSICAL TONE ACCOMPANIES KEYBOARD ENTRIES: When a key is 
pressed* a br ief musical lone indicates positive entry into the microcomputer. 




ON FREQUENCY CONTROL FROM MICROPHONE OR 
PANEL: Frequency is selected by buttons on the front panel or microphone 

• 8 CHANNEL MEMORY: Each memory channel is reprogrammable and stores 
the frequency and offset Memory is backed up by a NICAD battery when 

flower is removed. 
NSTANT MEMORY 1 RECALL: By pressing a button on the microphone or 
from panel, memory channel i may be accessed immediately, 
■ MEMORY SCAN; Memory channels may be continuousiy scanned for quick 
location of a busy or vacant frequency. 

• PROGRAMMABLE BAND SCAN: Any section of the band may be scanned in 
steps of 5 or 10 kHz. Scan limits are easily reprogrammed. 

•DISCRIMINATOR SCAN CONTROL (AZDEN EXCLUSIVE PATENT): The 
scanner stops by sensing the channel center so the unit always lands on the 
correct frequency COMPARE this with other units that claim to scan in 5-kHz 
steps! 

• THREE SCAN MODES WITH AUTO RESUME: Sampling" mode pauses at 
busy channels, then resumes, ^8usy" mode stops at a busy channel, then 
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channel and resumes when signal appears. If desired, auto resume may be 
prevented by pressing one button, COMPARE? 

• REMOTA8LE HEAD: The control head may be located as much as T5 feel 
away from the mam unit using the optional connecting cable. fiOMFARE? 



■ PL TONE OSCILLATOR BUILT IN: Frequency is adjustable to access PL 
repeaters, 

• MICROPHONE VOLUME/SQUELCH CONTROL: Both functions may be 
adjusted from either the microphone or front panel 

• NON-STANDARD OFFSETS: Three accessory offsets can be obtained for 
CAP/MARS or unusual repeater splits CAP and Air Force MARS splits are 
BUILT IN? COMPARE! 

• 25 WATTS OUT P UT^A l so 5 watts low power to conserve batteries in portable 
use. 

- GREEN FREQUENCY DISPLAY: Frequency numerate are green LEDs for 
superior visibility, 

• RECEIVER OFFSET: A channel lock switch allows monitoring of the repeater 
input frequency. COMPARE] 

• SUPERIOR REdtlV^R: Sensitivity is better than 28 uV for 20-dB quieting 
and 0.19 uV for 12-dB SINAD. The squelch sensitivity is superb, requiring less 
than 0.1 uV to open. The receiver audio circuits are designed for maximum 
intelligibility and fidelity COMPARER 

• ILLUMINATED KEYBOARD: Keyboard backlighting allows it to be seen at 
night 

♦TRUE FM, NOT PHASE MODULATION: Transmitted audio quality is op- 
timized by the same high standard of design and construction as is found in the 
receiver. The microphone amplifier and compression circuits offer intelligibility 
second to none. 

• OTHER FEATURES: Oynamic microphone, built-in speaker mobile mounting 
bracket , external remote speaker jack (head and radio) and much, much more 
All cords, plugs, fuses, microphone hanger etc. included Weight: 6 ibs. 

- ACCESSORIES: CS ECK 15-foot remote caWe... 535,00. CS-6R 6-amp ac 
power supply ... S49,95, CS-AS remote speaker... $18.00. CSTTK touch- 
tone* microphone kit. . $39 95, 



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AMATEUR-WHOLESALE ELECTRONICS order now toll free 



8817 S.W 129th Terrace Miami. Florida 33176 
Telephone (305) 233-3631 -Telex: 80^3356 
HOURS: 9-5 Mon. Ihru Fri. 
U.S. DISTRIBUTOR DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED 




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Manuscripts 

Contributions In the form ol manu 
scripts with drawings and/or photo- 
graphs are welcome and will be con- 
sidered for possible publics* tan, We 
cart assume no responsibility for loss 
or damage to any material. Please 
enclose a stamped, selt-addresaed 
envelope with each submission. Pay- 
men! for the use of any unsolicited 
matenai will be made upon accep- 
tance All contributions should be di- 
rected to the 73 editorial offices. 
"How to Write for 73" guidelines are 
aval (able upon request 

Editorial Offices: 

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Phone: 603-924-3873. 924-3874 

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Phone: 603-92*7138 

Circulation Offices: 

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Phone: 603-924 7296 

Subscription Rates 

In the United States and Possessions. 
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Elsewhere: 

Canada— $27.00/1 year only, U.S. 
funds Foreign surface mail— (36.00/1 
year only, U.S funds. Foreign air 
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To subscribe, 

renew or change 

an address: 

Write to 73 Magazine, Subscription 
Department, PO Box 931.. Farming- 
dale NY 11737 For renewals end 
changes of address, include the ad- 
dress label from your most recent 
issoe of 73, For gift subscriptions, ii> 
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Subscription 

problem or 

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Write to 73 Magazine Subscription 
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73 Magazine (ISSN 0098-9010} is pub- 
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ond class postage pa«J at Peterbof- 
ough NH 03458 and at additional mail- 
ing offices. Copyright (c) 1980 by 73, 
inc AM rights reserved. No part of this 
publication may be reprinted or other- 
wise reproduced without written per- 
mission from the publisher. Microfilm 
Edition— University Microfilm, Ann 
Arbor Ml 43106 




$349.95 



ANTENNA TUNER 

New Low Profile Design 

Here is a new tuner that 
puts more power into your 
antenna, works from 1 60 
through 10 meters, 
handles full regal power 
and then some, and works 
with coax, single wire and 
balanced lines. And it lets 
you tune up without going 
on the air I 



ROC NOISE BRIDGE $55.00 

• Learn the truth about your 
antenna. 

• Find its resonant frequency. 

• Adjust it to your operating fre- 
quency quickly and easily. 

If there is one place in your station 
where you cannot risk uncertain 
results, it is in your antenna. 



ANTENNA BALUNS 

Mode* 1 K $32.50 

1 Kw CW, 3 Kw PEP input. 
Model 2K $42.50 

2 Kw CW r 6 Kw PEP input. 
Beam Balum $47.50 

2 Kw CW, 6 Kw PEP input. 
Adjustable U bolt for mounting 
on rotary beams. 



IC KEYER $117.50 

All the desirable features are built into 
this compact self-contained unit. 
Sends manual, semi-automatic, dot 
memory, squeeze, and iambic. 
Speeds 5-50 wpm. Built-in sidetone, 
speaker, speed and volume controls. 



VLF CONVERTER $59.95 

• New device open up the world of 
Very Low Frequency radio. 

• Gives reception of the 1 750 
meter band at 160-190 KHz 
where transmitters of one watt 
power can be operated without 
FCC license. 

• Also covers the navigation 
radiobeacon band, standard fre- 
quency broadcasts, ship-fr>shore 
communications, and the Euro- 
pean tow frequency broadcast 
band, 




1750 METER XMTR $145.00 

• Main transmitter assembly factory 
wired and tested. 

• Antenna tuning assembly can be 
wired and mounted on your bread- 
board in less than an hour. 

• Meets all F.C.C. requirements. 
« For use in USA. only. Not for 

Canada. 



LOOP ANTENNA 



• Low noise reception. 

• Nulls out interference. 

• Accurate direction finder. 

• Rotates 360° in azimuth. Tilts 
±90° in elevation. 

• Superb nulls. 

e Loop amplifier connects to your 
receiver or to your VLF converter. 



Plug-in loops available for: 

1600-5000 KHz (16080 meter 

amateur bands) 550-1600 KHz 

(Broadcast Band) 

150*550 KHz (VLF. 1750 meter 

band) 

40*150 KHz {WWVB, Loran) 

10-40 KHz (Omega) 

5-15 MHz (Model HF-1) 

Loop Amplifier S67.50; Plug-in Loop 
Antenna $47.50 each 




Order today direct or from your favorite dealer. 

Include $3 shipping handling (54 for IC Keyer. 510 for Antenna 

Tuner). Add sales tax in Calif, Free catalog on request. 



4 73 Magazine * February, 1981 



Winter Olympics Torch Run 

— a one-year perspective 

KA2CNN/AAR2DE, KA2DBW 36 

New Life for Old Klystrons 

— tips for microwave experimenters 
WA4WDL 46 

Add RTTY to Your Repeater 

—voice operation is preserved 
WB4EMI 48 

to, 8i 

MA 6AZINE 




Build a 60-Hz Frequency Monitor 

— keep the power company on its toes 

■ * * W m m m m m * m m m m * ■ W\*ifF I l™»| 

Feelin' No Pain 

—expedition to Luckenbach 

.. .....W5QJM 

Operating Overseas 

— licensing facts for traveling hams 

A?rps 
Stalking the Elusive Ground Fault 

— a real-life adventure W50S 

An Operating Console with Class 

—customize to your heart's desire 
W8GI 



72 



74 



78 



82 



84 





O 



Olympic 
Tore 



OlympiaTo Lake Placida 



4 




A Patch for theTS-120S 

—add phone patch compatibility 

Successful Ham Classes 

—a guide for club organizers 



W5JJ 



-» * * - 



WB1FOD 



How FCC Rules Are Made 

—a labyrinthine tale., WD4DAZ 

A $10 Phone Patch 

Two Stations on One Antenna 

— Impossible? Guess again! 
WA4RRB, W84INC 



50 



56 



62 



68 



70 



Add-On Capacitance Meter 

— works with your counter 

W4FEC 

Better Pilot Lights 

-LEDs are the "in" thing. ... . . K4ZHM 

Caution: Solid-State Finals 

— learn to live with no-tune radios 
. N1II 

Under Software Control 

a— a repeater control system 
with minimal hardware 
.. . . . WD8CHH 

The Fun-Mitter— 

A Goof -Proof Rf Project 

— fail-safe QRP rig uses Radio Shack 
parts WA0RBR 



86 



89 



90 



94 



100 



Never Say Die — 6, Looking West — 14, RTTY Loop— 16, Contests— 18, Awards— 22, OSCAR Orbits— 24, Fun! 
-26, Letters-28, New Products -30, Review- 32, Ham Help- 108, 114, 119, 120, 124, Social Events-112, 
Corrections — 124, Dealer Directory — 145, Propagation— 145 

Cover; Photo by James Boesch WB3DBV, East Greenville PA. 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 5 



W2NSD/1 

NEVER SAY DIE 

ed/tor/a/ by Wayne Green 




HARC BOMB 

That's the Hudson Division 
ARRL Convention. . .an almost 
complete disaster according to 
the few survivors. Hardly any ex- 
hibitors and one of the most 
scant attendances of any HARC 
Convention, Lest I be given a 
hard time for just reporting the 
debacle without making some 
suggestions for the improve* 
ment of the show, Pd like to sug- 
gest that the event be put in the 
hands of someone competent 
. * * that a decent program be 
devised which features some- 
one who will attract attendance 
...that manufacturers and 
dealers be provided with low- 
cost exhibit facilities. . .that the 
event be advertised in more than 
just one ham magazine. , .and 
be run near New York City. 

A ham convention is a show 
which has costs running into the 
tens or even hundreds of thou- 
sands of dollars. In the hands of 
someone with no experience in 
promoting a show and with no 
ease in handling large sums of 
money, it is going to be screwed 
up. A show promoter has to 
know how to organize local 
clubs to get the work done. ..he 
has to be experienced in wheel- 
Ing and dealing with hotels and 
exhibition centers. . .with cater- 
ers... with entertainment. He 
has to already know about ad- 
vertising, PR, mailing lists, di- 
rect-mail work, mail order, . . 
etc. In other words, you do not 
turn a big business over to 
someone who has spent a Jife- 
time working for the telephone 
company, 

HARC has over 40,000 hams 
In the area, so they should be 
able to put on the biggest ham- 
fest or convention in the coun- 
try. They should be able to make 
even Dayton look sick. With that 

6 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



kind of an attendance prospect 
a convention that draws under 
1,000 is ridiculous. 

How about turning to a show 
promoter. ..a professional? 
Well, maybe, but Tve seen these 
birds work and they can screw 
you all ways to Sunday. They 
know all about skimming the 
gate, running up fake expenses, 
double billing. . .etc. I've seen 
some shows where it was ob- 
vious that $50,000 or more was 
being skimmed off the top. 



Hamfests and conventions 
can draw well if they are run 
right and well advertised. Our 
hobby is in desperate need of 
more successful hamfests. tor 
these events help bring out pro- 
spective hams and build up their 
enthusiasm. They can also 
make a lot of money for those 
*ho do the work. 

KENWOOD 

Visitors to Japan often arrive 
with a distorted idea of how ter- 




A busy production fine at Kenwood in Tokyo. 



ribly expensive the visit is going 
to be. Hotels are on the high 
side, but certainly are no worse 
than in London and much of Eu- 
rope. A visit to Tokyo can be an 
expensive experience if one is 
not wily unto the ways of the na- 
tives. I found It much like New 
York City, where meais come in 
all price ranges. 

Not being able to completely 
overcome my frugal Yankee her- 
itage, I tend to oscillate between 
a sort of fatalistic acceptance of 
the need to both give and enjoy 
lavish business entertainment 
and a lifetime of being thrifty. 
Thus, one evening I may be the 
guest (or even the host... 
aargh) of a fellow businessman 
and the next cadging free 
snacks In the food section of a 
Tokyo department store, armed 
with my best "I may buy some of 
this if I like it" smile. 

The practice of almost ail res- 
taurants of having the food on 
display {plaster replicas, actual- 
ly) in the front window, along 
w*th the price, makes it easy for 
the chintzy to shop for a cheap, 
but delicious meal. You can do 
nicely for $6 or $7, leaving the 
$200 dinners for more important 
evenings. If you get desperate, 
there are a number of American 
fast-food chains waiting for you. 
McDonalds is just about every- 
where in Japan, ready when 
your Big Mac attack comes . . 
and it eventually comes to every- 
one visiting a truly foreign coun- 
try, 

If a Big Mac doesn't get you. 
then you'lf be able to get a rea* 
sonable and familiar meal at a 
Kentucky Fried Chicken, a Dairy 
Queen, or a Shakey's ("All the 
pizz and flies you can eat'), 
There's even a Wendy's, . . right 
there on the Ginza (Broadway) in 
Tokyo, complete with a stan- 
dard Frosty. I'm a very big fan of 
the Wendy's salad bar, but that 
has not yet been exported. . . 
and I've checked "em out in 
Brussels, too. 

This trip to Tokyo had three 
major purposes. That was 
enough to keep me busy day 
and night, rushing to a computer 
show to see what the latest 
in Japanese microcomputers 
might be like... then talking 
with prospective trading part- 
ners about Instant Software. . . 
and meeting hams and ham 
equipment people. With quite a 
number of the Japanese firms 
promising to start exporting mi- 
crocomputers to the US in 1981, 
I wanted to see what they had to 
offer and get an idea of what the 



& KENWOOD 






, pacesetter in amateur radio 



TRIO-KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS INC. 

1111 WEST WALNUT / COMPTON, CA 90220 



Small wonder. 




Processor, N/W switch, IF shift, DFC 



• II 



Hon 




An incredibly compact, fun-featured, all solid- 
state HF SSB/CW transceiver for both mobile 
and fixed operation. It covers 3.5 to 29.7 MHz 
(including the three new Amateur bands!) and is 
loaded with optimum operating features such as 
digital display, IF shift, speech processor, nar- 
row/wide filter selection (on both SS8 and CW), 
and optional DFC-230 digital frequency control- 
ler The TS-130S runs high power and the TS-1 30V 
is a low-power version for QRP applications, 

TS-130 SERIES reATURES: 

* 60-10 meters. Including three new bands 
Covers all Amateur bands from 3,5 to 2 9. 7 MHz, 
including the new 10, 18, and 24-MHz bands. 
Receives WWV on 10 WlHz, VFO covers more than 
50 kHz above and below each 500-kHz band. 

• Two power versions , . . easy operation 

TS-1 303 runs 200 W PEP/ 160 W DC input on 80 -15 
meters and 160 W PEP/140 W DC on 12 and 10 
meters. TS-130V runs 25 W PEP/20 W DC input on 
all bands Solid-state, wideband final amplifier 
eliminates transmitter tuning, and receiver wide- 
band RF amplifiers eliminate preselector peaking. 

Built-in speech processor 

Increases audio punch and average SSB output 
power, while suppressing sideband splatter. 



* CW narrow/wide selection 

"N-W switch allows selection of wide and narrow 
bandwidths. Wide CW and SSB bandwidths are 
the same. Optional YK-88C {500 Hz) or YK-68CN 
(270 Hz) filter may be installed for narrow CW 
■ SSB narrow selection 
"N-W* switch allows selection of narrow SSB band- 
width to eliminate QRM, when optional YK-8BSN 
(1.8 kHz) f filer is installed. (CW filter may still be 
selected m CW mode.) 

* Sideband mode selected automatically 

LSB is selected on 40 meters and below, and USB 
on 30 meters and above. SSB REVERSE position 
is provided on the MODE switch, 
Built-in digital display 

Six -digit green J lu orescent lube display indicates 
actual operating frequency to 100 Hz. Also indicates 
externaf VFO or fixed-channel frequency, RIT shift, 
and CW transmit/receive shifts. Also analog sub- 
dial for backup frequency indication. 

- IF shift 

Allows IF passband to be moved away from inter- 
fering signals and sideband splatter. 

* Single -conversion PLL system 

Improves stability as well as transmit and receive 
spurious characteristics 

Built-in RF attenuator 

For optimum rejection of intermediation 

distortion. 

Built-in VOX 

For convenient SSB operation, as well 

as semibfeak-in CW with sidetone. 



Effective noise blanker 

Eliminates pulse-type interference such as ignition 
noise. 
■ Built-in 25-kHz marker 
Accurate frequency reference for calibration. 

• Compact and lightweight 

Measures only 3-3f4 inches high, 9-1 f2 inches 
wide, and 11-9/16 inches deep, and weighs only 
12.3 pounds. II is slyied to enhance the appearance 
of any fixed or mobile station. 




Optional DFC-230 Digital Frequency Controller 

Allows frequency control m 20-Hz steps with UP/ 
DOWN microphone (supplied with DFC-230J, In- 
eludes four memories (handy for split-frequency 
operation) and digital display. Covers 100 kHz 
above and below each 500-kHz band Very compact. 




Ask your Authorized Kenwood Dealer 
about the compact, full-featured, all 
solid-state TS-130 Series. 

MOTE: Price, specifications subject to change 
without notice and obligation. 



MATCHING ACCESSORIES FOR FIXED-STATION OPERATION: 

• PS-30 base-station power • SP-120 external speaker 

supply (remotely switch- • VFO- 120 remote VFO 

able on and off with • MC-50 50kQ/5O0O desk 

TS-1 30 S power switch y microphone 

Other accessories not shown: 



YK-88C (500 Hz) and 
YK-88CN (270 Hz) CW filters 
YK-83SN (1 8 kHz) 
narrow SSB filter 
AT-13Q compact antenna 
tunef (80-10 m, including 
3 new bands) 
MB-100 mobile mounting 
bracket 



MC^SOS and MC-35S 
noise cancelling hand 
microphones 
PC-1 bhone patch 
TL-922A linear amplifier 
HS-5 and HS-4 headphones 
HC-10 world digital clock 
PS-20 base-station power 
supply tor TS-130V 



SP-4Q compact mobile 
speaker 



VFO-230 digital VFO witn 
five memories 



STAFF 



PUBUSHEfUEDfTOn 
Wftynti Grmmn W2NSD. 1 

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT 

Shtrry Smyth* 

ABfllfTANT PU»USHEft/tOnoft 
JBtt OftTfiy WB8BTH 

ASSOCIATE PUBUSHEfUDlRECTOR 

OF PUtLlCAHONS 

Edwmrd F«m«n WA1UFY 

MANAGING EDTTCM1 
John BvmttS 

ASST- «AK)AO!NO EOfTOft 
5ui*fi PhUbficR 

NEWS ECMTOR 
Gane S*n*d« WB8TQV 

EDITORIAL ASSSTANTS 

Richard Ptwu* 

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 

Chrcs Brown KA1D 

Piul Grupp KBdNVH 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS 
Suxy Gtyn« 
Pit Graham 

ASSOCIATES 

Robert Baker WB2GFE 

Jim CKln K1TN 

8111 Goar>ay KE7C 

Sanoec Green 

Dave Ingrarn KiTWJ 

Larry Kanaiw WB2NEL 

Joe Kaeaer &3ZCZ 
Or Marc Leavuy wasajr 
Dave Mann K2AGZ 
Bill PssternikWAQlTF 
John SchulU W4F* 
Peter Start K20AW 

MANUFACTURING MANAGER 

Noel Sell WBlARP 

PRODUCTION MANAGERS 
PUS LIGATIONS 
Nancy Salmon 

ASST PRODUCTION 
U AM AG Efl/P U BUG ATlO MS 

Michael Murphy 

ART DIRECTOR 
Diana Sftonk 

ADVERTISING GRAPHICS 

MANAGER 

Robert Drew 

PRODUCTION 

Joan Ahem 

William Anderson III 

Sieve Baldwin 

Linda Ore* 

Bob Dukette 

Bruce Hedin 

Kenneth Jackson 

Rosi Kenvon KA1GAV 

Marfan n Metevker 

Tnereea Ostebo 

Dion Owons 

Patrice Scnbner 

Susan SymoAda 

Thornaa ViOenewe 

PHOTOGRAPH* 

William Hoydolph 

Terrle Anderson 

Bill SultanfiakJ 

TOESfTTTNG 

Barbara Lain 

Sara Bedell 

Mary rUnzetl 

Karen Podiycki 

Micheie DeaRochera 

Linda Locke 

Luan Kaddy 

CORPORATE CONTROLLER 

Crta/lea Garniaa, Jf 

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 
Leatrics ON ell 

ACCOUNTING MANAGER 
Knuii KeMex KV4GG/1 

CIRCULATION MANAGER 
Debra Boodrtsiu 

CIRCULATION 

Doria Day 

603-924 7296 

Pauline Johns Lone 

BULK SALES MANAGER 
GJnnie Bcudrf«au 

ADVERTISING 

Jim Gray W1XU. Mflf 
Nancy Ciampq, Asst. Mgr. 



American firms are really up 
against I found out and the 
news is not good for the Ameri- 
can firms. 

Since the US is quite a bit 
ahead of Japan in the develop- 
ment of programs for microcom- 
puters, \ was interested in devel- 
oping a market in Japan for the 
nearly 1,000 programs which my 
firm. Instant Software, has 
either released or has ready for 
release. I needed a good sized 
firm which could translate our 
programs and distribute them in 
Japan. Despite the shortness of 
my visit to Tokyo, both of these 
objectives seem to have been 
accomplished. Time will tell. 

The way for a visit with the 
people at Kenwood was paved 
by Ken Bourne W6HX, their US 
marketing manager. Everything 
went off in style, from being 
picked up at the hotel and driven 
to the factory to my talks with 
their engineers and a look at 
their production and research 
departments. 



In the last few months I've 
written a good deal about some 
ideas L have for advancing ham 
equipment. I was hoping Ken- 
wood might be interested in 
some of these ideas and per- 
haps put them through their re- 
search lab and end up with 
some practical equipment for 
us. Some of these ideas were 
first discussed at the 1980 Ham 
Industry Conference in Aspen 
and others have evolved since 
then. I find that 1 brainstorm the 
best with a group of ham engi- 
neers so I was really looking for- 
ward to the session. 

All of the top people at Trio- 
Kenwood whom I met were ac- 
complished in English, so our 
talks were not slowed down by 
the need for translations. The 
meeting started off with a pre- 
sentation to me by Mr. Toshio 
Okuhara, the managing direc- 
tor, of a complete TR-24Q0 sys- 
tem. This a wonderful Japanese 
custom and one which I'm going 
to try to import. 



The Kenwood factory, while 
obviously efficient and well or- 
ganized, was not remarkably dif- 
ferent from some American 
firms I've visited. The quantities 
of units made is not large 
enough for the use of really 
automated systems such as I 
saw in Korea, where they were 
turning out color television sets 
with hardly any manual labor at 
all. No, the big difference be- 
tween Kenwood and the Ameri- 
can firms I've visited lies in their 
research laboratory. This was 
big, busy, and packed with avid 
hams. 

The idea for a subaudibie 
tone for automatic identifica- 
tion of ham rigs, which I have 
discussed in my editorials, cer* 
tainiy intrigued them. I think this 
one development alone could 
bring about major changes (for 
the better) In amateur radio, Ob* 
viously It would spark a whole 
new generation of transceivers 
, , . plus a lot of adapters for 
older rigs. This is just one more 



Well . . A Can Dream, Can't I? 



by Bandel Linn K4PP 



dHERMAtt 



ATto*?HEY 




"And under the terms of the will, your uncle is leaving you $750,000— of which 
$50,000 must be spent for ham gear." 



8 73 Magazine • February, 1981 





/-"wasi-s. 




ICOM IC-255A 

Features that have made the field proven and tested 
IC-255A the most popular 2 meter FM rig on the air today. 

• 25 W / 1 W battery saving output 

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• Programmable splits - Fetxibility for new repeater offsets 

• Dual speed tuning - 1 5 KHz Steps, 5 KHz Steps with TS Switch depressed 

• 5 memory channels - For easy access to your favorite repeaters 

• Dual VFO's built in. Icckable mobile mount, dynamic mic standard, RIT fine 
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The empty chassis starts at one end and comes out with everything ready for testing. 



■ 




A custom which is curious to Japan is one of presenting a gift to a 
visitor. While I 'm usually good for a free lunch, here you can see Mr 
Okuhara, the managing director of Kenwood, presenting me with a 
complete TR-2400 hand transceiver system. . , in return for a measly 
magazine. 



marriage of digital electronics 
and amateur radio. 

We also discussed some of 
the recent developments in nar- 
rowband single sideband which 
are promising us 5-kHz-wide re- 
peaters for our VHF bands. Of 
course, if we are unable to get 
amateur radio back into a 
growth mode, we really won't 
need room for a whole lot more 
repeaters. I'm hoping that some* 
thing can be done to get our 
growth back up over 10% so 
that eventually we'll be hurting 
for more repeater channels. 

This meeting occurred before 
I'd bought one of the new Sony 
TC-300S stereo cassette record- 
ers, so I hadn't yet come up with 
the idea for stereo double side- 
band. I did discuss DSB and its 
promise for providing up to 25 to 
30 times more possible occu- 
pancy on our HF bands. I sure 
wish someone would start some 
work along that line. Will stereo 



be even better? We'll see. 

Our talking ran on into dinner* 
time r so they took Sherry and me 
to Tokyo's famous garden res- 
taurant, Chinzan-So, a place for 
entertaining honored guests (I 
got that from the brochure I 
picked up at the restaurant). The 
food, the service, and the loca- 
tion were spectacular. 

Sometimes I get a bit de- 
pressed over not having the time 
and the facilities which I wish I 
had. I 'd love to get into a lab for a 
few weeks and come up with a 
working piece of hardware for 
automatic identification. During 
these moments I suffer from 
flights of fancy about starting a 
lab and peopling it with ham ex- 
perimenters. Then practicality 
sets in and I recognize that even 
if I was able to find people like 
that, there would be no way I 
could afford them. No, that sort 
of lab will have to be run by our 
manufacturers. . Jor now. 



10 73 Magazine ■ February, 1981 



WAYNE'S ASIAN ALBUM 




You've heard about the high food prices in Tokyo? This is the menu 
at a food stand concession at the Consumer Electronic Show. Two 
hundred Yen is equal to $1 US, so you can see that the prices are not 
at aff out of fine with what you would pay at a concession stand in 
America. Soup needle* by the way, is noodle soup. 




Here's Sherry working on the bowl of tempura soup needle ($1.75), 
which did a fair fob of feeding both of us. in addition to the bowl of 
noodles and soup, there were a coupfe good-sized shrimp tempura. 




Wendy's is not much different from anywhere else, with a double 
hamburger weighing in at around $3. 75 with ait the trimmings. One 
unusual item was a shrimp sandwich at $1.10. 




I'll let you in on a secret. . . Wayne realty likes the Wendy's Frosty* 




A recent television show discussed the Japanese approach to driv- 
ing: They make a big deal out of driving school. Here is a practice 
driving course laid out on the top of a garage. It is busy alt day long. 
Does this extra training pay off? You bet! Per capita, the Japanese 
have less than 3% as many accidents as we do. You rarely see a car 
with dents or signs of body work, it is almost enough to make a 
politician think. . „ but not quite. 




For about $6 you get a lacquer tray full of food. Delicious, and identi- 
cal to the beautifully made plaster model in the restaurant window. 
AH I had to do was take the waiter out and point and we got our 

meals. 



Continued on page 110 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 11 



A fresh idea! 

Our new crop of tone equipment is the freshest thing growing 
in the encoder/decoder field today. All tones are instantly 
programmable by setting a dip switch; no counter is required. 
Frequency accuracy is an astonishing ± . I Hz over all temper- 
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touch-tones and burst-tones. 
And, of course, there's no 

need to mention our JL^WJlW SW TS-32 

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1 year warranty. 








TS-32 Encoder-Decoder 

•Size: 1.25" x 2.0* x ,40" 

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• Available in all 32 E1A standard CTCSS tones 

SS-32 Encoder 

•Size: ;9"xL3 H x.40* 

• Available with either Group A or Group B tones 

Frequencies Available: 





Group A 




67.0 XZ 


91.5 ZZ 


118.8 2B 


156,7 5A 


71.9 XA 


94.8 ZA 


123.0 3Z 


| 162.2 5B 


74.4 WA 


97.4 ZB 


j 127.3 3A 


167.9 62 


77.0 XB 


100.0 IZ 


131.8 3B 


173,8 6 A 


79.7 SP 


103.5 IA 


136.5 4Z 


179,9 6B 


82.5 YZ 


107.2 IB 


J41.3 4A 


186.2 7Z 


85.4 YA 


110.9 2Z 


146.2 4B 


192.8 7 A 


88.5 YB 


114.8 2A 


151.4 5Z 


203.5 Ml 



Frequency accuracy, ±.1 Hz maximum -40°Cto + 85°C 
Frequencies to 250 Hz available on special order 
Continuous tone 



Group B 



TEST- TONES: 

600 

1000 

1500 

2175 
2805 



TOUCH-TONES: 

697 1209 



770 

852 
941 



1336 
1477 
1633 



BURST-TONES: 
1600 1850 2150 2400 
1650 1900 2200 2450 
1700 1950 2250 2500 
1750 2000 2300 2550 
1800 2100 2350 



* Frequency accuracy, ± 1 Hz maximum - 40°C to + 85°C 

• Tone length approximately 300ms. May be lengthened, 

shortened or eliminated by changing value of resistor 

Wired and tested: TS-32 $59.95, SS-32 $29.95 





COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS 

426 West Taft Avenue, Orange, California 92667 
(800) 854-0547/ California: (714) 998-3021 




•"15 



LOOKING WEST 



Bit! Pasternak WA6ITF 

c/q The Westlink Radio Network 

Suite 718 

7046 Hollywood Blvd. 

Hollywood CA 90028 

They're at it again. The spec- 
trum thieves, I mean. Those who 
view the 220-to-225-MHz band 
with an acquisitive eye, envi- 
sioning huge corporate profits if 
they can find a way to steal the 
band from those of us who now 
occupy it, Maybe 220 CB is 

dead, and maybe "the ARRl 
slew it" as it is claimed* Anyway, 
the ARRL has not been all that 
successful in convincing other 
potential spectrum thieves that 
they mean business. Nor do I 
think they can. No, guys and 
gals, I don't think we can count 
on Newington to pull us out of 
this one. We are going to have to 
conquer this one on our own. it 
means pulling together and tak- 
ing the offensive once and for 
all. You and I are going to have 
to fight hard lo save 220. Don't 
look for help anywhere else. 

It seems that the latest attack 
is coming from Inland Water- 
ways again. That's the same 
group we thought we had 
trounced last year. I guess some 
people never (earn, because 
they are again eyeing 220 to 225 
MHz to relieve the purported 
congestion in the 160-MHz ma- 
rine band. Last year they wanted 
to construct an 'Inland Water- 
ways Automated Data Relay tf 
system along the Mississippi 
and connecting waterways. 
Now they want more room for 
boats to talk, and pass the time 
of day. What next? 

Well, there is a "next." it 
seems that the manufacturers 
of cordless telephones are also 
eyeing 220. Cordless phones are 
becoming very popular these 
days, and the people who make 
them are running out of room on 
72 MHz- So they are reported to 
be looking at new spectrum in 
both the 27-MHz CB band and 
the 220-MHz amateur band for 
their exclusive use. The Decem- 
ber, 1980, issue of Popular Elec- 
tronics carried a rather interest- 
ing article on the subject. If you 
are a 220-MHz user, I suggest 
you read it and respond to the 
editors. Maybe they can help get 



the word back to industry that 
there are several thousand of us 
who are not willing to just go 
away. You can kind of discount 
the 27-MHz idea as there is no 
way for the cordless phones to 
be compatible with current CB 
activity, either within 27 MHz or 
on either side. So in reality J 
think we can assume that it's 
220 they will go after; We have a 
two-pronged attack on us It 
seems, and It might wind up to 
be one heck of a fight. Why? Be- 
cause both of these entities 
seem to believe that 220 to 225 
MHz is vacant spectrum, that it 
Is not In use by anyone, and is, 
therefore, ripe for the taking. 

There are many ways in which 
we can fight the problem. In the 
past we have always taken the 
nice-guy approach, and year af- 
ter year we face the same threat. 
Maybe it T s time to forget that we 
are usually ladies and gentle- 
men and take a hard line: that 
220 to 225 MHz is amateur, and 
that It will always remain ama- 
teur. Sounds like a challenge to 
war, you say? I prefer to think of 
it as a response to a challenge. 
A response which will educate 
spectrum thieves with respect 
to the abundant amateur active 
ty on 220 and the fact that this 
activity is there to stay, That we 
as amateurs learned our lesson 
wef I when the FCC took 1 1 me- 
ters and created the CB fiasco. 
That we will never permit this to 
happen again. That the band is 
ours, that all of our bands are 
ours, and that we are prepared 
to fight to retain every last kilo- 
hertz. 

Frankly, most of the VHF/UHF 
experts I have spoken with 
agree that It would be impossi- 
ble to share the 220 band with 
any other service, be it inland 
Waterways, cordless tele- 
phones, or what have you. The 
way we have structured the 
band in its development over the 
past 5 or 6 years precludes this. 
It might be possible if we did not 
have repeaters sitting atop 
mountains with the ability to 
talk over several hundred miles. 
Even In areas where repeaters 
talk over only 50 or 60 miles, the 
mutual interference would be 
massive and intolerable. In the 
end you would have another 27- 



MHz fiasco and no way to solve 
the problem. One or the other 
would have to go, and I know 
that the amateur community 
would stand pat and not budge. 
This could and would lead to an 
ongoing confrontation between 
the business community and 
the amateur. It would be a war 
that neither side could win, so 
why have it in the first place? 

There Is no way that FCC reg- 
ulation could help make this 
spectrum sharing work. Look at 
the record, look at the present 
mess, called 27-MHz, Class D 
CB. Here you are dealing with 
technologically-incompetent 
people, for the most part. Appli- 
ance operators who buy a legal 
radio, an illegal amplifier, and 
talk worldwide. Has the Com- 
mission been able to solve the 
regulatory enforcement prob- 
lem? Has the linear amplifier 
ban worked? Has any regulation 
or attempted enforcement of the 
27-MHz problem worked? The 
answer is a resounding no! The 
FCC says it lacks the funds to 
do an effective job of enforce- 
ment on 11 meters, but even if 
they had the monies,, I doubt if 
they could catch any but the 
most hardcore offenders. And, 
of those already caught, how 
many turn out to be repeat viola- 
tors who care little or nothing 
about the rules to begin with? 

Until now, Industry and others 
have viewed the radio amateur 
as the tinkerer who is given the 
cast-off frequencies until such 
time as they are needed by 
someone else. It is thought that 
once a need arises, we ama- 
teurs will simply vanish as mys- 
teriously as we came, This is a 
stereotype upon which we are 
viewed and judged, In part, the 
stereotype Is justified because 
we have projected this image for 
so many years that it has be- 
come the thinking of today's so* 
ciety. What many fail to recog- 
nize is that another type of ama- 
teur has emerged in recent 
times. He may or may not be a 
technical whiz kid, but no longer 
Is he a back-room boy; he has 
social awareness. He is the kind 
of guy who will not be trampled 
on by others. In some cases, this 
may have manifested itself in 
contemptuous behavior— jam- 
ming, foul language, or what 
have you. But the majority are 
well-respected professionals. 
Doctors, lawyers, broadcasters. 
You name it. People with an ear 
to the ground and an eye on so- 
ciety. Activists with strong be- 



liefs and ideals. Slowly but sure- 
ly these people became dedicat- 
ed to the preservation of the am- 
ateur service and to its contin- 
ued vitality. 

The spectrum thieves seem 
unaware that this has hap- 
pened. They are used to dealing 
with the Newington types that 
they usually can walk all over. 
What they have yet to catch on- 
to is that In the battle over 220 
they will not be dealing with 
Newington but rather with the 
people now on the band, People 
who long ago turned a deaf ear 
to the ARRL and have fought 
and won wars for themselves. 
Most of the 220 people in my 
part of the nation turn to New- 
ington the same deaf ear they 
turn to VHF. So, "Mr. Business- 
man, fT in this one you must face 
the angry mob alone. For the 
first time in its long history, the 
amateur service is ready to 
break out of its traditional good- 
guy role to do battle with what 
they consider to be the enemy. 
You, "Mr. Cordless Telephone" 
and you, "Mr, Inland Water* 
ways," you're far from being our 
"good buddy." We know what 
you spectrum thieves want, and 
believe me when I tell you to 
look elsewhere. . .like 600 or 
900 MHz. We don't want you on 
220 or near 220. From us to you: 
Go play in the bathtub with a toy 
boat. 

You can't say you weren't 
warned. 

A BOOK REVIEW 

Well, he's done it again. One 
never knows what to expect 
next out of Bob Hell K9EID. Just 
when the effects of his previous 
amateur-radio-related escapade 
seem to begin fading, Bob goes 
ahead and pulls another rabbit 
out of his bottomless hat and 
hits home once again. Bob's 
latest creation is a book titled 
The 10-Meter FM Handbook. Vve 
got a better title: "Everything 
and Anything You Ever Wanted 
to Know About 10-Meter FM 
When You Didn't Know Whom to 
Ask the Questions Of. 1 * It's that 
inclusive. 

For those of you who may not 
be familiar with Bob. he is the 
founder and president of Heil 
Sound Ltd., an electronics man- 
ufacturer of professional audio 
equipment for the entertain- 
ment industry. Since 1966. he 
has been one of the pioneers of 
VHF, SSB, and he spends a 

Continued on page 106 



14 73 Magazine • February, 1981 




1 



D 



T*iy-T«C / WodW .y«0 J3f 1M 



HO H P 7 



MM 



»LC - TIOH 



OFFSET 



*. ■ - 



micrtvmr a* - 



BAMO 




THE 



17 



STATION FOR CHANGING TIMES 



DELTA — symbol of change — and the first HF transceiver 
with all nine bands — offers more of the features you need 
for these changing times. 

Tennessee Technology Leads The Way. 

Today's operating demands the changes a DELTA station offers. All 
nine HF bands in all solid-state design with optimized receiver 
sensitivity and select) vitu200 watt, 100% duty cycle no- tune 
transmitter, QSK. VOX, FTT T ALC Notch, Offset and more. All in 
a compact, ready-to- go- anywhere functional design that offers light 
weight, thorough shielding, and operating ease. And a price that 
permits affording the full complement of accessories. TEN-TEC put 
it all together— in DELTA— for you. 

For The Change in Bands. 

DELTA with all nine bands- another TEN TEC "first/ ' 160 
through 10 meters, Including the new 10, 18 and 24.5 MHz bands. 
(Crystals optional for 18 & 24.5 MHz). DELTA is ready 

For The Change In Band Conditions. 

Optimized design for the ideal balance between sensitivity (0.3 /iV 
for 10 dB S + N/N) and dynamic range (85 dB or better) plus 
switchable 20 dB attenuator that puts you in control of even 
extreme situations. No matter where you live or what power your 
neighbor is running, DELTA can handle it. 

Super selectivity permits narrowing DELTA bandpass to suit the 
crowds The four-position switch selects the standard 2,4 kHz SSB 
filter, adds a section of the 4-stage active audio filter, cascades an 
optional CW filter {for 14 poles of filtering), and cascades both 
filters with 4 stages of audio filters to give you the passband window 
you need with the virtually ultimate skirt selectivity required to knife 
through strong adjacent signals. 

Built-ins to quiet the world* A variable notch filter is standard on 
DELTA. Vary from 200 to 3500 Hz to notch out interfering carriers 
or CW signals to a depth of 50 dB or more. Offset tuning for 
moving the receiver frequency ± 1 kHz to reach that DX or to fine 
tune. tl Hang 7 ' AGC to give you smoother receiver operation. 

For The Change in Operating Styles. 

Variety is the word for today, and DELTA offers it 

For a rag-chew with an old friend, 200 watts of SSB to the proven 
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For the fun of operating 200 watts CW with QSK— full fast 
break-in that makes CW a conversation, saves time, and opens a 
window on DX. 



Power up or down. Adjustable threshold ALC and drive let you 
choose power levels with full ALC control. 

DELTA accepts what you have, what you want - . , from separate 
antennas to linears t transverters, remote VFCX 12 VDC, keyers and 
more— just plug in. 

For The Change In Lifestyles. 

DELTA moves with you. "At home" anywhere— on your operating 
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size (4%"h x ll%*w x 15"d) and light weight (12H lbs.) make it a 
good traveling companion. Yet compact as it is, DELTA panel size 
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For The Change In Economics. 

These days, everyone wants more value for his money. And 
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The DELTA Rig 

Model 580 DELTA Transceiver $849.00 

Model 283 DELTA Remote VFO 179.00 

Model 280 DELTA Power Supply . . . . 149.00 

Model 282, 250 Hz CW Filter 50.00 

Model 285, 500 Hz CW Filter 45,00 

Model 234 RF Speech Processor 124.00 

Model 214 Electret Microphone 39.00 

Model 645 Dual Paddle Keyer * . , ...-.*.**. < 85.00 



Other Optional Accessories 

Model 670 Single Paddle Keyer 

Model 227 Antenna Tuner 



34.50 
79.00 



Isn't it time for you to change? Check the DELTA rig at your dealer 
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THBF- 

SEVtCI 



INC. 



SEVfEfWiUE. TEHHESSEE JUtt 

(«"mt \m umcotN Art Chicago, iu m-v 



RTTY LOOP 



Marc t. Leavey, M.D, WA3AJR 
4006 Wintee Road 
Randaltstown MD 21133 

In all the years that I have 
been writing this column, I have 
always tried to keep the tone 
light and cheerful. It Is with 
some regret, therefore, that I 
must alter the tone this month, 
as 1 begin with an obituary. 

Although not involved with 
amateur radioteletype at its in- 
ception, being only twenty-eight 
years old, this youngster played 
an important role in the intro- 
duction of new features In RTTY 
operation, such as selective 
calling, that we still appreciate 
today. Most of us became ac- 
quainted with this relative new* 
comer after getting involved in 
RTTY, and many remain at- 
tached, even to this day. 

Several siblings have been 
quite Influential In the growing 
computer field and, in a wanton 
act of genocide, they also are 
being dispatched. Yes, well 
miss them. But have no fear, for 
in the surplus market they shall 
live on to be resurrected time 
and time again as this part and 
that is replaced, much as Chose 
long gone have done before, 

What am I talking about? 
Why, the Model 28 Teletype® , of 
course! The Teletype Corpora- 
tion will cease production of 
this venerable machine soon. 
Others in the line, most notably 
the ASCII Model 33, also will go 
out of production. While spare 
parts will be maintained, and 
most of us did not get ours new 
anyway, it feels like another era 
is passing by; 

If one era passes, though, 
then another arrives— and 
that's just what I am going to 
write about this month. One of 
the most exciting new develop- 
ments In ham RTTY is the intro- 
duction of the computerized 
RTTY terminal It is hard to pick 
up a magazine and miss the ads 
for the many complicated boxes 
which seem to do everything but 
turn off the shack lights when 
you are done operating. And 
now, RTTY Loop will take a 
close look at one of them: the 
Microlog ATR-6600. 

About three years ago, the Mi- 
crolog Corporation, located 
here in Maryland, introduced a 



video RTTY system. Based on 
the Motorola 6600 microproces- 
sor, the system featured sepa- 
rate transmit (AKB-1) and re- 
ceive (AVR-1) units, a video mon- 
itor, and a raft of options. Buy- 
ing one fully stocked would have 
cost you about twelve hundred 
1978 dollars. As experience has 
been gained, new features have 
been devised and the com- 
pany's latest offering, the 
ATR-6800, packs it all into one 
box only slightly larger than the 
keyboard of three years ago. For 
a shade under two thousand 
1981 dollars, it runs rings 
around the old system. Unfortu- 
nately, some compromises had 
to be made to fit everything in 
there, and I will cover some of 
them after going over the high- 
lights of the unit. 

First off, what can it do? Well, 
the basics of the unit include a 
6800 microprocessor supported 
by a monitor program in 2716 
PROM, about 4K of RAM, and 
one and one-half PI As, Into ail of 
this is stuffed enough program- 
ming to satisfy almost any oper- 
ator. Data exchange is by any of 
three modes: Morse code, 
Baudot code, or ASCII. Trans- 
mission rates are available for 
any common, and a few not so 
common, speeds. From the 
user's point of view, operation is 
remarkably constant no matter 
what the code, so let's look at 
that first. 

The video display Is a black 
and white 24-Iine-by-40charac- 
ter display. At the top of the dis- 
play, a dedicated line shows the 
current transmit/receive status, 
mode, speed, and time. The time 
is maintained In an internal 
twenty-four hour clock set from 
the keyboard. The display is 
selectable as white on black or 
black on white, and a zoom com- 
mand produces a twelve4ine-by- 
twenty-character display that 
can be read from across the 
room— even on the small Sanyo, 
nine-Inch monitor. The display is 
normally maintained in a split- 
screen format with the transmit 
buffer on top and the received 
data below a dashed line. The 
transmit buffer display may be 
removed entirely or its size 
varied from one to twenty lines 
(seven lines maximum in the 
zoom format). 



There are several outputs 
available from the ATR-6800 
that allow interfacing to a wide 
variety of devices. Standard 
video goes to the monitor, of 
course. A high-speed mercury 
relay is available to insert in a 
loop supply to allow hard copy 
on a teleprinter. Gomputer-conrh 
patible RS-232 levels also are 
provided so that devices using 
this transmission standard may 
be connected. For turning the 
transmit ler on and off, voltage 
keying is available for both 
positive and negative circuits. 
AFSK tones also are generated, 
and their frequency and shift 
may be specified from the key- 
board. Options are available to 
either silence the output tones 
during receive or leave them on, 
thus allowing VOX keying, If 
desired. 

Inputs include speaker audio 
as well as TTL or dry contacts 
for a hand key or whatever. 
Again, RS-232 interfacing is pro- 
vided for users of this standard. 
Now, not only can you connect 
the receiver, transmitter, and old 
clunker printer, but interfacing 
is provided also for a standard 
cassette recorder. Why? To save 
pictures, messages, or what- 
ever, and send these plus your 
own "brag tape."' Keyboard con- 
trolled, of course. To aid in tun- 
ing, outputs are provided also 
for an oscilloscope which will 
display a "cross" type of tuning 
pattern on received signals. 

The operating system pro* 
vides several features which 
may be used no matter what the 
mode. An ID key may be pro- 
grammed to send the station's 
identification whenever pressed, 
and an alternate (SHIFTED) can 
send another one, perhaps in- 
cluding an automatic CW ID for 
RTTY operation, Ten messages 
may be stored and recalled ac- 
tively during a QSO. A test signal 
may be sent appropriate to the 
mode in use: RYRYRY in Baudot, 
U*U*U*U* in ASCII, or WV in 
Morse. We've all heard of diddle, 
that familiar sending of LET- 
TERS when not sending anything 
else. Well, when you select this 
mode in Morse, the time is filled 
with BT (- . . . -) so that the other 
guy does not think you died. 

Let's see, what else can I tell 
you? You can tell the thing to 
send each letter as you type it, to 
delay sending a word until you 
type a space, or to send the 
whole line after a carriage return 
only. Makes editing nice and 
easy, especially on Morse. (1 can 
type faster than I can send 



Morse— much faster!) 

What's that you say, "the 
modes"? Ah, yes, the modes. 
Well, you see, you have your 
Morse, your Baudot, and your 
ASCII. Now, when you are in 
Morse, the transmit speed may 
be adjusted in one-word- per- 
minute increments from five to 
199 words per minute. The re- 
ceive speed is self-tracking to 
the speed of the sending sta- 
tion. All of the special Morse 
signs, such as SK, AR, BT, KN, 
and varied and sundry punctua- 
tion marks are supported. And, 
of course, all of the general fea- 
tures mentioned above work 
just fine. When you are in Morse, 
the front end of the ATR-6800 
functions as a direct detector, 
looking for an 800-Hz tone. 
When It finds that frequency, it 
locks on and the fun begins. 

Now, in Baudot you have a 
choice of 45.45 baud (also 
known as the 60-word-per-mln- 
ute standard) as well as 50, 57, 
74, and 100 baud, corresponding 
to 66, 75, 100, and 1 32 words per 
minute. All kinds of RTTY 
niceties can be called into play 
here, such as downshift (or non- 
downshift) on space, automatic 
carriage return, line feed after 
so many characters, or remoting 
to an external printer. In this 
mode, the Input Is routed 
through a computer enhanced 
demodulator, which detects the 
usual 21 25 Hz-2975 Hz pair, with 
other tones selectable from the 
keyboard. 

By selecting one of the stan- 
dard ASCII transmission rates, 
110 or 300 baud, the encoding is 
switched to ASCII with the full 
character set supported. Much 
as with many other primarily up- 
percase machines, you must 
shift to get lowercase, but this is 
a minor inconvenience as text 
editing is not one of the primary 
applications of the machine. Al- 
though the full ASCII appears to 
be generated, the display ROM 
does not have all of the appro- 
priate symbols in it. It uses, 
rather, several patterns of dots 
for several of the codes. This 
causes no real problem unless 
you are fond of braces instead 
of parentheses, or tildes, or sev- 
eral other of the less-used sym* 
bo Is. 

Besides communicating on 
the air, the ASCII capability can 
be directed through a "comput- 
er 11 mode in which the ATR-6800 

becomes essentially a stupid 

Continued on page 122 



16 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



EW FRO M H AL 



ELECTRONIC MAILBOX FOR RTTY 




MSO-3100 

Message Storage 
Option for 
DS3100 $595.00 



V^i 4?JSi 




'* \ A "=l 









• DELETEF 


• 


KY20N 


• DIR 


• 


KY20FF 


• ENDRLE 


• 


PFHNTON 


• EXIT 


• 


PRINTOFF 


• FILEHELP 


■ 


OBF 


• HELP 


• 


READF 


• KYI ON 


• 


RYS 


• KYIOFF 


• 


WRITEF 









lfl«.l*l|J^tifr< 



- ■!»* 



akiE in*. iiiiiBi » •: 







DS3100ASR 
S 1995.00 



The DS31 00 Super Terminal is now even 
more versatile with the addition of the new 
MSO310& 

The Message Storage Option (MSO) adds 
mass storage to the DS3100 so that relatively 
long messages may now be stored and replayed 
at will For example, the MSO-3100 will provide 
more than 32,000 characters of additional 
storage— approximately 450 lines for messages. 
Messages are stored in variable length files 
with user-assigned file names and pass-words 
for file protection if desired 



The MSO feature may be accessed from 
either the DS31 00 keyboard or by other 
users through the WRU feature of the ASR 
terminal Thus, messages can be written, 
played, and relayed with either remote or 
local control 

Automatic TX/RX relay control, CW ID, and 
user help messages make the ■electronic 
mailbox easy for all to use. This factory 
installed option may also be used for brag- 
tape and net bulletin preparation and storage. 

Write or call us for more details 



When our customers talk ...we listen. 




fit 



HAL COMMUNICATIONS CORP. 

Urbana, Illinois 61801 Box 365 217 367 7373 



For our European customers, contact: Richter & Co D 3000 Hannover 1 • Transradio SA. 681 6 Bissone/ 

Lugano • Radio Shack. Ltd.. London NW63AY ^ms 



CONTESTS 




Robert Baker WB2GFB 
75 Windsor Dr. 
At co NJ 08004 



CWSP INTERNATIONAL 
DX COMPETITION 

0000 GMT February 7 
2400 QMT February 6 

Amateurs throughout the 
world are invited to participate 
In the annual CWSP contest us* 
Ing all bands on CW only. Entry 
classes include a) single oper- 
ator, b) multi-operator (only club 
stations, single transmitter), 
and c) QRP Jimited to 10 Watts 
with a single operator. 



EXCHANGE: 

RST and QSO number start- 
ing with 001. CWSP members 
will add "/CWSP" alter the 
report. ORP operators will add 
"/power." Example: 579015/5. 

SCORING: 

QSOs with same country = 1 
point, other countries in same 
continent = 2 points, and other 
continents = 3 points each. 
Multipliers are ARRL OXCC 
countries and each Brazilian 
prefix (PY1, PT7 t PS8. etc.). Mul- 
tipliers are counted only once 
regardless of band. Final score 
is total QSO points times the 
total multiplier. 

AWARDS: 

Cup and award to 1st place 
worldwide. Medal and award to 
1st place in each continent, 
Awards to 1st place in each 
country. Special awards to 1st 
and 2nd CWSP members. Other 
special awards tor clubs and 



c 

Feb 7-8 


ALEHOAR 

New Hampshire QSO Party 


Feb 7-8 


Two-Land QSO Party 


Feb 7-8 


RSGB 7-MHz Contest— Phone 


Feb 7-8 


CWSP International DX Competition 


Feb 7*9 


Vermont QSO Party 


Feb 9-10 


Land o T Lincoln QSO Party 


Feb 14-15 


QCWA QSO Party— CW 


Feb 14-15 


YL-OM Phone Contest 


Feb 21-22 


ARRL DX Contest— CW 


Feb 27-Mar 1 


CQ World Wide 160 Contest— Phone 


Feb 28-Mar 1 


G-QRP-Club CW Activity Weekend 


Feb 28-Mar 1 


French Phone Contest 


Feb 28-Mar 1 


RSGB 7-MHz Contest— CW 


Feb 28-Mar 1 


YL-OM CW Contest 


Mar 7-8 


1981 SSTV Contest 


Mar 7-8 


ARRL DX Contest— Phone 


Mar 14 


Boy Scout Exhibition Station 


Mar 14-15 


QCWA QSO Party— Phone 


Mar 21-22 


Bermuda Contest 


Mar 21-22 


CARF Phone Commonwealth Contest 


Mar 21-23 


BARTG Spring RTTY Contest 


Mar 28-29 


Spring VHF QSO Party 


Mar 28-29 


CQ World Wide WPX— SSB 


Aug 6-9 


European DX Contest— CW 


Sep 12-13 


European DX Contest— Phone 


Sep 12-13 


G-QRP-Club CW Activity Weekend 


Sep 12-14 


Washington State QSO Party 


Nov 1445 


European DX Contest— RTTY 


Dec 26-31 


G QRP Club Winter Sports 



QRP 1st worldwide and 1st 
Brazil. 

ENTRIES: 

Logs must contain data and 
time in GMT, station worked, ex- 
change, multipliers, and points 
per band. Please use separate 
logs for each band. Logs and 
summary sheet must be mailed 
not later than March 15, 1981, to: 
CWSP Contest Committee, PO 
Box 15098, 01000 Sao Paulo, SP 
—Brazil. 

1960 RESULTS: 

1st World = PY1ARS/4; 1st 
South America = PY8BI; 1st 

North America = WA40ML; 1st 
USA = W10PJ. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE QSO PARTY 

2000 GMT February 7 to 
0500 GMT February 6 

1400 GMT February 8 to 
0200 GMT February 

Sponsored by the Concord 
Brasspounders, the contest is 
open to all radio amateurs. Each 
station may be contacted once 
per band, per mode. 

EXCHANGE: 

RSfT) and NH county/ARRL 
section or country. 

FREQUENCIES: 

CW~1810 t 3555, 3730, 7055, 
7130. 14055, 21055, 21130, 
28130. 

Phone- 1820, 3935, 3975 T 
7235, 14280, 21380, 28575, 
50,115, 145.015, 

SCORING: 

Score 5 points for each NH 
station contacted and multiply 



by the number of NH counties 
worked. NH stations score 1 
point for each QSO and multiply 
by the total number of ARRL 
sections, countries, and NH 
counties. 

ENTRIES: 

Logs with summary sheet and 
dupe sheet should be mailed not 
later than March 16, 1961, to: O. 
W. H. Johnson, Box 63, Bristol 
NH 03222. 

VERMONT QSO PARTY 

2100 GMT February 7 
0100 GMT February 9 

Sponsored by the Central Ver- 
mont Amateur Radio Club, sta- 
tions may be worked once per 
band and mode. VT mobile sta- 
tions may be worked again con- 
sidering each new county they 
enter as a new station. 

EXCHANGE: 

QSO number, RSfT), and VT 
county or ARRL section. 

FREQUENCIES: 

3685, 3909, 3932 t 7060 t 7265, 
7290, 14060, 14290, 14345, 
21060, 21375, 28100, 28600, 
50,260, 50,360, 144-144.5, 145.8. 

SCORING: 

Score 3 points per contact 
and multiply by the number of 
VT counties worked on each 
band. VT stations score 1 point 
per QSO and multiply by the 
number of ARRL sections and 
countries worked, 

AWARDS: 

Certificates to highest scor- 
ing station in each ARRL sec- 



RES( 

Third DARC Corona 


ILTS 

OK1WEQ 


375 


10-Meter RTTY Contest 


DL4GJ 


364 








G4HYD 


325 




Class A 




EA3BLQ 


322 


N8ES 




2340 


DF8FD 


231 


DL5GAS 




1739 


W5T7B 


064 


WB2UEF 




1546 


DF6ZY 


063 


OZ1CRL 




1209 


LA2IJ 


050 


DF6ZV/A 




1120 


LA7QM 


025 


WA6WGL 




962 


Y32ZF 


018 


ADiV 




945 


Y53UA 


002 


G3HJC 




851 






15CBF 




651 


Class B 




SL5AR 




628 


H.BALLENBERGER 


972 


EA3BQQ 




608 


WERNER LUDWID 


580 


WWBX 




580 


OK 120677 


252 


OK3KH 




400 


Y2-7111/A 


144 



18 73 Magazine * February, 1981 



tion and country, Trophy to 
highest scoring single-operator 
station in VT. Additionally, their 
names will be added to the Doris 
McGrath memorial plaque. Do- 
nated in memory of W1EOB, this 
award will be awarded in this 
manner for a 10-year period. The 
operator winning the QSO party 
the most times or the station 
with the highest score during 
the period will receive the 
plaque. Other certificates for 
2nd, 3rd, and 4th highest scoring 
stations in VT. The W-VT 
(Worked Vermont) Award will be 
issued to stations working 13 
out of Vermont's 14 counties, 
provided the station has not pre- 
viously received this award, A 
special certificate will also be 
awarded VT multi-operator sta- 
tions. 

ENTRIES: 

Send logs or facsimiles 
together with an SASE no later 
than March 31, 1961, to: Gerald 
W. Benedict, W1BD, 23 Foster 
Street, Montpeiier VT 05602. 

LAND O 1 LINCOLN QSO PARTY 

0000 GMT February 9 
2400 GMT February 10 

The contest is sponsored by 
the Land o' Lincoln chapter of 
10-X International in coopera- 
tion with the Central Illinois 
Radio Club. Operating through^ 
out the 10-meter band on CW 
and phone t LOL and CtRC mem- 
bers will call "CQ LOL" in an ef- 
fort to contact as many stations 
as possible, 

EXCHANGE: 

Name, QTH, RS(T), serial 
number t 10-X number if any, and 
LOL certificate number If any, 

SCORING: 

LOL certificate holders world- 
wide and CI RC members score 1 
point per QSO, 2 points per QSO 
with 10~X number exchange, and 
3 points per QSP with LOL num- 
ber exchange. Multiply total 
QSO points (3 max per QSO) by 
number of different states, 
Canadian provinces, and OXCC 
countries worked. 

All others, score 1 point per 
QSO with LOL certificate hold- 
ers, 2 points per QSO with local 
LOL and CIRC members. Multi- 
ply total QSO points (2 max per 
QSO) by number of different 
states, Ganadian provinces, and 
DXCC countries worked. 

Achievement certificates will 
be awarded to the top scorers m 
each state, Canadian province, 



and DXCC country. A special 
Novice certificate will also be 
awarded. Make sure to denote 
Novice on your entry! 

ENTRIES: 

Logs, fully duped and sum- 
marized, to be submitted no 
later than March 15 f 1981, to: 
AG9E. Dave Meiser, 1112 An* 
dover, Btoomington IL 61701, 
Please include an SASE for 
special QSO and/or results. 

QCWA QSO PARTY- CW 

0001 GMT February 14 
2400 GMT February 15 

This is the 24th annual QCWA 
QSO party with separate week- 
ends for CW and phone. Con- 
tacts with the same station on 
more than one band can be 
scored only once. Contacts 
made with "captive" stations, 
such as when operating in local 
nets, are not valid. 

EXCHANGE: 

QSO number, operator's 
name, and QCWA chapter iden- 
tification (official number or 
name). Members not affiliated 
with a chapter should use M AL" 
If a member belongs to several 
chapters, then one must be 
chosen and used for the QSO 
Party. If desired, you may use 
one chapter for the CW Party 
and another one that you belong 
to for the Phone Party. 

FREQUENCIES: 

Any authorized amateur fre- 
quency is permissible. The fol- 
lowing suggested frequencies 
have been selected to minimize 
interference to others: 

Phone -3900-3930, 7230-7260, 
14280-14310, 21350*21380, 
28600*28630. 

CW - 3530-3560. 7030-7060, 
14030-14060, 21040-21070, 
28040-29070. 

SCORING: 

Each contact made with an- 
other QCWA member will count 
as a single point. Add up the 
contacts with QCWA members 
and then multiply this number 
by the number of Chapters 
represented, 

AWARDS: 

Plaques for the top phone and 
top CW scorers. Certificates will 
be given for the 2nd through 5th 
runners up in both the phone 
and CW Parties. Standings and 
scores wilt be published in the 
QCWA NEWS summer, 1981, 
issue. 



ENTRfES: 

Logs should include the fol- 
lowing information: Time (GMT), 
call, QSO numbers, name t Chap- 
ter number or name, state or 
country. It is the responsibility 
of each contestant to provide a 
legible log (no carbon copies) 
and to list ail claimed contacts. 
The total contacts for each page 
will be recorded at the bottom of 
each page. The total contacts 
for the Party should be recorded 
at the top-right of the first page 
of the log. Log sheets will not be 
returned. Make sure you have 
correct postage when you mall 



your logs. Send logs no later 
than March 31, 1981, to: Pelican 
Chapter QCWA, Arthur M< Men- 
sees W4BK t 1407 48th Avenue 
NE, St. Petersburg FL 33703. 
Separate logs and scores must 
be submitted for both the CW 
and phone Parties. The decision 
of the Pelican Chapter of QCWA 
will be final with respect to 
scores and rules. In the event of 
errors or a disagreement, keep 
all details off the air and write 
either the Pelican Chapter or 
QCWA Headquarters. 

Continued on page 108 



Rl 

RESULTS OF 


5SI 


UTS 

Ohio 




1980 WASHINGTON STATE 


WSEX 


2,502 


QSO PARTY 




Oklahoma 








N5CII 


351 


Alaska 




Pennsylvania 




NL7D 


330 


WA3JXW 


351 


Arizona 




South Carolina 


i 


W7ZMD 


7,280 


K4BZD 


870 


California 




South Dakota 




N6PE 


7,317 


WA0BZD 


8 


Colorado 




Tennessee 




KA9CLS 


1 f 411 


WA4CMS 


1,162 


Connecticut 




Texas 




W1TEE 


2,112 


W5VGX 


3,759 


Florida 




Utah 




MM 


1,116 


W7LN 


1 t 078 


Georgia 




Virginia 




N4NX 


5,796 


W4KMS 


1,001 


Idaho 




West Virginia 




K87N 


33 


WA6CNN 


561 


Illinois 




Wisconsin 




W9QWM 


3,466 


K9GDF 


1,386 


Indiana 




Canada 




WD8QBB/9 


2,688 


VE3KK 


1,200 


Iowa 




England 




WB0UIT 


374 


G3MZV 


432 


Kansas 




Japan 




KfTJB 


506 


JA7KE 


614 


Kentucky 




Peru 




N4AOC 


1,862 


OA8AX 


24 


Louisiana 








W5WG 


4,500 


Washington 




Maine 




Clark 




WB1GLH 


32 


W7FQE 


1,488 


Maryland 




Grant 




W3PY2 


9B6 


W7WMO 


59,856 


Massachusetts 




Jefferson 




W1AQE 


1,395 


W7IEU/7 


3,888 


Michigan 




King 




YV8WVU 


1,092 


N7AYF 


37,476 


Missouri 




Kitsap 




KtfRWL 


2,520 


W7DAZ 


40,150 


New Jersey 




Kittitas 




K9CW72 


1,040 


KA7FWW 


10,815 


New York 




Mason 




W2RPZ 


1,485 


WB7DZN 


63,424 


North Carolina 




Pacific 




K4YFH 


1,190 


VE7ZZ/W7 


174,141 



73 Magazine * February, 1981 19 



__ 



■■ 



Destined to become 

an old friend 



This is one piece of equipment you'll keep 
for a long time. We've designed out the ob- 
solescence with our new plug-in application 
modules. These fully shielded modules, about 
the size of a business card, will keep your ATR- 
6800 as new as tomorrow with updates, and 
future program expansion. You'll be proud of 
its top "on-the-air" RTTY/CW performance, and 
of its versatility as your HAM COMPUTER/STA- 



TION CONTROL Make a permanent place in 
your station for the system that won't gather 
dust! ATR-6800 system with 10 practical pro- 
grams in module number one, and nine inch 
video monitor . . . $2495, Companion printer, 
add $450. Module #1 separately, $189. Get to 
know the active hams at MICROLOG Corp M 
4 Professional Drive, Gaithersburg, MD. 20760. 
Tel: (301)948-5307. 




COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM 




MICROLOG 

INNOVATORS IN DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS 



20 73 Magazine • February. 1981 



ATR-6800 Standard Features 



COMPATIBILITY with any radio transceiver. Simple speaker 
audio input, no extra equipment, terminal units, etc., required. 
Everything is built in, Narrow band single tone phase correlation 
detector for CW t dual tone computer enhanced demodulator for 

Rm\ 

EXTENSIVE SHIELDING and a hefiarc welded heavy aluminum 
enclosure for a degree of RFI immunity that plastic or loose 
sheet metal cased units cannot touch. Solid quality you can feek 

SPLIT SCREEN OPERATION allows you to type and edit your 
transmit text {up to 1800 characters) even while receiving. Loca- 
tion of split line (amount of viewable receive and transmit text) is 
keyboard programmable anywhere on the screen. 

UP TO 10 INDEPENDENT MESSAGES of up to 80 characters 
each can be stored for instant recall. 

WRU AND SEL CAL MEMORIES for 'auto-response' capabilities. 

BATTERY BACKUP MEMORY for all stored messages. ID and 
operating parameters means that when you lose power (or turn it 
off) the memory is retained. A full charge will hold memory for 
about two weeks. (Charging circuit built in.) 

HARD COPY PRINTER INTERFACE actually converts any code 
input to your printer's code and speed. For example, MORSE 
code inputs to the ATR can be printed on any Baudot machine 
(Model 28, etc.). Baudot to ASCII or ASCII 1o Baudot conversion 
is easy and the line length is programmable, 

AUTO-START inhibits display of non-RTTY signals, 

AUTO CW ID IN RTTY shifts from RTTY to MORSE, sends your 
call and automatically shifts back to RTTY. 

MICROLOG EXCLUSIVE NON STANDARD TTY SPEEDS plus all 

standard Baudot and ASCII speeds. (Ap. Mod. No. 1.) 



MICROLOG EXCLUSIVE "SYNC-LOCK" ASCII @ 110 and 300 

Baud is compatible with all other equipment. Sends standard 
ASCII codes with extended stop bit which prevents 
loss of sync on Interference hits. This lowers the 
"info" rate while maintaining ASCII character rate. 

ULTRA-CLEAN SYNTHESIZED SINE WAVE AUDIO 

outputs for AFSK, and SSTV are keyboard program- 
mable for any tone pairs between 500 and 3000 Hz. 



SOLID STATE SWITCHES as well as high speed mer- 
cury relay (n.o. and n.c) keying outputs. 

ZOOM DISPLAY MODE doubles the character size for 
even easier viewing. Video can be black letters on 
white background or reversed white on black. 



TAPE RECORDER INTERFACE for prerecording your 

message on standard cassette tape for later retransmission, or 

for direct recording of received signals or computer programs. 

CONVENIENT SCOPE OUTPUT for RTTY tuning and a unique re- 
generated audio tuning aid for CW, as well as an LEO for both 
modes. 

KEYBOARD CONTROLLED TRANSMIT/RECEIVE RELAY for 
automatic transceive switching. 

QUICK BROWN FOX, RYRY in Baudot. U"U* in ASCII and VVV in 
Morse stored in ROM. 

RANDOM CODE GROUPS of 5 characters, MORSE or RTTY. for 
test transmissions, 

INTERNAL 24 HOUR CLOCK displayed on screen may be in- 
serted into transmit text at any time, or used in your computer 
program. 



FULL 63 KEY COMPUTER GRADE KEYBOARD. 

KEYBOARD CONTROLLED UNSHIFT on space in Baudot for 
auto reset to LTRS after reception of space. 

VISUAL DISPLAY of all operating parameters shows system 
status and control commands, 

REMOTE COMPUTER TERMINAL via butlt In RS-232 connector 
at rates of up to 9600 baud. 

APPLICATION MODULE plugs directly into the rear panel con- 
nector. 

MODULE NUMBER ONE INCLUDES: 

AUTO SEND/RESPONSE — sends repetitive message, listens 
for reply, returns the call and alerts the operator. 

SSTV — outputs standard SSTV tones for sending farge 
screen characters and graphics, 

MAIL BOX — unattended message store and retrieval, 

RTTY SPEED SEEKER — determines the speed and code of an 
incoming signal. 

LOG KEEPER — prints QSO t no., time, and log data, 

NON STANDARD SPEEDS — ASCII operation at 10 to 100 baud. 

SELECTIVE PRINT — keywords enable/disable printer. 

SPECIAL AUTO-START - inhibits display of "non text" data. 

DUMP TAPE — allows user to "dump" selected segments of 
memory to standard cassette tape. 

SYSTEM DIAGNOSTICS — 3 self test modes. 



REAR PANEL CONNECTIONS 






■Ml 



o o o 

ifrrNC trm afj« 



e 




Willi 



# (£ 







SOLID STATE SWITCHES 

TRANSMIT/RECEIVE RELAY 

PROGRAMMABLE TONE OUTPUT 

STANDARD RS 232 CONNECTOR 

RECORDER INTERFACE 

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73 Magazine • February, 1981 21 



AWARDS 



Bill Gosney WB7BFK 
Micro-SQ, inc. 
2665 North Busby Road 
Oak Harbor WA 98277 

ALGOA BRANCH 
MERIT AWARD 

This past month some very 
encouraging letters of support 
have been received from all 
parts of the world. Of particular 
note was the letter I received 
from Fred Strutt ZS2JS, repre- 
senting the Algoa Branch of the 
South African Radio League, In 
his letter, Fred tells of their new 
award recognizing operator effi- 
ciency in CW communications. 

The Algoa Branch Merit 
Award will be issued to an/ 
radio amateur who has had a 
minimum of 250 CW QSOs with 
any other amateurs of the world. 

To qualify, all contacts must 
have been made after January 1 , 
1979. While QSLs are not re- 
quired, the appJicanl must have 
his list of contacts verified by at 
least two fellow amateurs or by 
a radio club secretary. Endorse- 
ments will be issued in incre* 
ments of 250 CW QSOs. 

To apply, forward your veri- 
fied list of CW contacts and an 
award fee of five (5) IRCs to; 
Algoa Branch Merit Award, PO 
Box 10050, Linton Grange, Port 
Elizabeth 6015, South Africa. 

It has been some time since 
we have listed an Asian conti- 
nent award. Without further ado, 
allow me to share with you a let- 
ter I received from our dear 
friend, Mr Green VS6EZ. In his 



letter, Anthony tells us of two 
awards being made available by 
amateur associates in his coun- 
try, the Hong Kong Amateur 
Radio Transmitting Sociely 
(HARTS). 

THE HONG KONG 
FIRECRACKER AWARD 

Sponsored by HARTS, the 
Firecracker Award is issued to 
licensed amateurs and short- 
wave listeners worldwide. Con* 
tacts on or after January 1 , 1964, 
are valid. 

To qualify for their very spec- 
tacular diploma, applicants 
within zones 18, 19 3 24, 25 T 26, 27, 
and 28 require confirmation with 
at least 10 individual VS6 sta- 
tions. All other zones of the 
world require only six (6) VS6 
contacts to qualify for the 
award. Awards are issued for all 
CW, all phone, and mixed mode. 
Single-band accomplishments 
will be recognized if requested 
at the time of application. 

Do not send QSL cards! Pre- 
pare a list of claimed contacts 
and have them verified by at 
least two amateurs or a radio 
club secretary. Forward this list 
and an award fee of 10 IRCs to: 
HARTS, Post Box 541, Hong 
Kong. 

NINE DRAGONS AWARD 

Probably one of the most 
elaborate of my Far Eastern 
awards is the achievement 
diploma Known as the Nine 
Dragons Award, Sponsored by 








HARTS, this brilliant award with 
its red, black, and shiny gold ac- 
cents an amateur's wall with the 
dignity that makes all award 
seekers proud. 

To qualify, the applicant must 
make contact with a country in 
each of the following zones: 18, 
19, 24, 25, 26, 27. 28 T 29, and 30. 

The contact made in zone 24 
must be with a VS6 station. Sta- 
tions located within any of these 
nine zones will require two (2J 
contacts in each zone as above. 

To be valid, all contacts must 
be made after January 1 t 1979. 
There are no band or mode re- 
strictions for this award; how- 
ever, special recognition will be 
granted If requested at the time 
application is made. 

To apply* prepare your list of 
claimed contacts and have it 
verified by at least two amateurs 
or a radio club secretary. Send 
this list and an award fee of 
$2.00 or 10 IRCs to: HARTS, Post 
Box 541, Hong Kong, 

While in Asia, it would be 
proper to review one of the 
largest awards programs in that 
part of the world t the one spon- 
sored by JARL, more commonly 
referred to as the Japan Ama- 
teur Radio League, 

ADXA AWARD 

Sponsored by JARL, the 
ADXA (Asian DX Award) is avail- 
able to licensed amateurs and 
shortwave listening stations 
worldwide. To qualify, all 
claimed contacts must have 
been made on and after July 30, 
1952, 

The requirements for ADXA 
are fairly straightforward. Ap- 
plicants must establish two-way 
contact with at least thirty (30) 
countries in the Asian conti- 
nent. A list of eligible countries 
appears below. 

Do not send QSL cards! Pre- 
pare a list of claimed contacts 
and have it verifed by at least 
two fellow amateurs or a local 
radio club official 

Forward your application and 
an award fee of 8 IRCs directly 
to: Awards Manager, JARL, Post 
Box 377, Tokyi Central, Tokyo, 
Japan. 

ADXA Countries: A4, A51, A6, 
A7, A9, AP, BV, BF-BU, CR9, EP, 
EP, HIWHL JA-JE-JJ, JR, JD1 
(KG6I), JD1 t JT, JY, OD5, S21, 
TA t UA9-UAQ UD6, UF6, UG6, 
UHB, UI8, UJ8, UL7, UM8, VS6, 
VU, VU2 VU7 VU9 f VU5-VU7, XU, 
XV5 (3W8K XW8, X22, YA, Yt, YK, 
1S, 4S7, 4W f 4X4-4Z4, 5B4, 70, 
BQ6, SZ4, 9K2, 9M2, 9N1, 9V1, 



WORKED/HEARD ALL 
JAPAN PREFECTURES 

Also sponsored by the Japan 
Amateur Radio League, the 
WAJA Award is available to li- 
censed amateurs and SWL sta- 
tions on a heard-only basis. All 
contacts, to be valid, must have 
been made on or after July 30, 
1952. The only exception to that 
rule is for contacts with Okina- 
wa (JR6) t for which contacts on 
or after May 15, 1972, are con- 
sidered valid for this award, In 
addition, all contacts must be 
made only with fixed base sta- 
tions. 

To qualify, the applicant must 
make contact with a Japanese 
amateur operator in each of the 
47 Japanese prefectures as they 
appear below. 

Do not send QSL cards! Have 
your list of claimed prefectures 
verified by at least two amateurs 
or a local radio club secretary. 
Send this list and an award fee 
of 6 IRCs to: JARL Awards Man* 
ager, Post Box 377, Tokyo Cen- 
tral, Tokyo, Japan, 

Japanese prefectures: JA1 — 
Tokyo, Kanagawa, Chiba, 
Saitama, Ibaraki, Tochigi, Gum- 
ma, Yamanashi; JA2— Shi- 
zuoka, Gifu, Aichi. Mie: 
JA3 — Kyoto, Shiga, Nara, 
Osaka, Wakayama, Hyogo; 
J A4 — Qkayama, Shi mane, 
Yamaguchi, Tottori, Hiroshima; 
JA5— Kagawa, Tokushima, 
Ehime, Kochi; JA6— Fukuoka, 
Saga, Nagasaki, Kumamoto, 
Oita, Miyazaki, Kagoshlma, 
Okinawa (JR6); JA7— Aomori, 
Iwate, Akita, Yamagata, Miyagi, 
Fukushima; JA8— Hokkaido; 
JA9— Toyama, Fukui, Ishikawa, 
and JA0— Niigata, Nagano* 

ALL JAPAN 
DISTRICTS AWARD 

The Worked All Japan Dis- 
tricts Award is sponsored by the 
JARL and is available to li- 
censed amateurs and SWL sta- 
tions on a heard-only basis. This 
very basic award requires the 
applicant to make contact with 
one Japan station in each of the 
ten Japanese call districts. 

This award is issued for sin- 
gle- and mixed-band accom- 
plishments and also recognizes 
single- and mixed-mode 
achievements as well. To be 
valid, all contacts must have 
been made on or after July 30, 
195Z 

To apply, have your list of con- 
tacts verified by at least two 
amateurs or a local radio club 
Official. Keep in mind that KA 



22 73 Magaztne * February, 1981 





stations (US military) will not be 
accepted for award credit. 

Send your application with an 
award fee of eight {8) IRCs to the 
Awards Manager, JARL, Post 
Box 377, Tokyo Central, Tokyo, 
Japan. 

JAPAN CENTURY 
CITIES AWARD 

Similar to our own 73 
Magazine Century Cities Award, 
the Japanese version is spon- 
sored by the JARL requiring the 
applicant to make contact with 
a minimum of 100 individual 
cities within Japan. There are no 
further requirements and no 
stipulation as to band or mode. 
Endorsements are issued for 
each Increment of 100 addition- 
al cities worked. 

Applicants are asked not to 
send QSL cards! Prepare your 
list of cities in order of the city 
number. Though this may be 
confusing to some, it is best to 
write the JARL for a copy of this 
cities listing. This will enable 
you to make quick reference to 
the actual number assigned 
each city and will speed prepa- 
ration of your application. 

Once arranged in order, have 
your list of contacts verified by 
at least two fellow amateurs or a 
local radio club official* Send 
the application and an award 
fee of eight (8) IRCs to: JARL 
Awards Manager. Post Box 377, 
Tokyo Central, Tokyo, Japan* 

As a final note, for those ap- 
plicants who are fortunate 
enough to work at) cities listed 
in Japan, a special Worked AH 
Cities Award has been designed 
especially to recognize your 
feat! 

Representing the Naniwa 
Club in Japan, Akio Sonoda 
JR3DDQ recently wrote me and 



asked that I share his club's new 
award with our many readers. 
With pleasure t present— 

THE JAPAN OSAKA CENTURY 
CERTIFICATE 

The JOCC Award is issued by 
the Naniwa Amateur Radio Club 
of Japan, It is made available to 
licensed amateurs throughout 
the world* To qualify for the 
award, applicants must submit 
proof of contact with stations 
within the Osaka prefecture* 
Three award categories are of- 
fered: 

• Junior Class — applicant 
must work 10 JA stations which 
enable you to spell "NANIWA 
CLUB" with the last letter of 
each callsign contacted. 

m Standard Class— applicant 
must work 10 different stations 
In the Osaka prefecture. Gold 
seal endorsements will be is- 
sued for each increment of 50- 

• Special Class — applicants 
must work 100 different stations 
in the Osaka Prefecture, includ- 
ing 62 stations located in all 31 
cities, 5 guns, and 26 wards of 
the prefecture. Note: A list of cit- 
ies, guns, and wards is available 
from the Awards Manager for 
three (3) IRCs, 

There are no band or mode re- 
quirements, but special recogni- 
tion will be made if a request is 
made at the time of application. 

Do not send QSL cards* HavB 
your list of contacts verified by 
at least two amateurs or a radio 
club official. Send your applica- 
tion and eight (8) IRCs to the 
Awards Manger, Akio Sonoda 
JR30DQ, 3-6*8 Daikoku-cho, 
Naniwa-chu. Osaka* Japan 556* 
For Gold Seal endorsements, 

Continued on page 1 14 



OPERATION BALLARAT 

There are at feast two Belie rats. One is a thriving city in southern Austral fee, 
about 240 kilometers north of Melbourne, it boasts a population ot approximately 
75 r 000 and is the principal city in Australia's gold country, it is a modern city with 
an air of progress and prosperity. 

In extreme contrast is the oiher Ballarat. It is an almost forgotten ghost town In 
the rugged desolate mountain range which rings California's. Death Valley, The 
California BaHarat is tied to Australia 's through a young prospector named George 
Riggins, who. In 1897, came from the famous Australian mining center of Ballarat 

The prospectors who gathered In the Panamtni mountain range wanted a town 
named where they struck it rich Erg gins suggested the new town be gjven the 
name identified with goto the world over and it was named Ban a rat. However, in the 
early decade of the new century, the mines were exhausted and the town of 
Ballarat, California, became deserted. 

Now; almost 100 years later, amateur radio will brieUy revive ihe town For a 
short period during the winter weekend of January 30-31 and February 1, 1981. the 
old ghost town will become alive again. This tirrra it will not be humming mining 
machinery or tall head trames towering above the hills hauling gold Ore from the 
mine shafts. It wlil be humming from the sound ot gasoline-driven emergency gen 

orators 

Towering beam antennas and di poles will replace the head frames and ore 
Crushers. The miners trademark, the pick and Ihe shovel, will be replaced with 
radio operators' microphones and headsets. The prize will not be IhegoEd nuggets 
but a certificate, showing today's scene trorn both Ballarats. linked together, 
although 10,000 kilometers apart. 

To participate in this firsl-of-a-fcfnd event, yog must contact both Sallarats on 
either 10, 1S, 20, or 40 meters on SSB, Some of you may also be interested to know 
thai the California Ballarat is located in sparsely populated Inyo County and is 
probably high on many county hunters' most wanted lists. 

By this time, you may be curious enough to wonder how ail this is going to hap- 
pen. Early. Friday, January 30. an advance group will leave the Los Angeles area, 
drive a bout 400 kilometers through the Mojave Desert into the Panamints and what 
is left of Balierai A suitable site will be selected and a VHF station will be estab- 
lished to guide tnose that follow later that day 

When the four HF transceivers, three 500- Watt linear amplifiers, beam antennas, 
the 1-kW gasoline-electric generators, and the balance of the support equipment 
t\svG arrived, we will start to set up. By then, Ihe group of twenty will be in work 
teams with each receiving lis task. The criterion to demonstrate the establishment 
of an emergency communications center in a desolate area within a two-hour 
period is fust a side objective of this weekend activity. 

At G200Z on Saturday, January 31 , we will be ready to go to work. We will operate 
mi0f>2B.6O0. 21,135-21.370. and 14.27544.350 MHz until 140GZ, February 2, when 
Ihe last contact from the ghost town will be acknowledged. 

We will first took for our namesake in Australia, as it would be nice lo have the 
first contact with them, But here is what Is important for you if want to participate 
and obtain a cerllf rcate You must communicate with two out of twenty stations In 
Ballarat. Australia, and the one at the ghost town. Grve your callsign and signal 
report- You will get an identifier, a sequential number, and the last two characters 
of the Ballarat station's callsign. It will always be GC from the ghost town station 
and two letters from Australia. Contact the other Ballarat and give your callsign 
and the identifier you received It does not matter which Ballarat you contact first 
That way we can verity that you qualify For the certificate. 

Send your name, callsign, identifier, address, and on* IRC (International Reply 
Coupon} to WA6NKL, 48 1 7 Paseo de Las Tort ugas r Torrance CA 90505. or VK3VEZ, 
2 Cambridge Street. We ndouree. Victoria 3355. Austral la. Your certificate will be on 
its way shortly. Good luck. 

Paul M. Turkheimer WA6NKL 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 23 



OSCAR ORBITS 



Cwt&f of AMSAT 

The OSCAR satellites are subject to atmospheric drag, of course, 
and the present period of intense solar activity has accentuated the 
problem. During this period, our sun has been expelling huge 
numbers of charged particles, some of which find their way into the 
Earth's upper atmosphere, increasing the density (and thus the 
drag) there, It is through this region that the OSCARs must pass. 
OSCAR 8, in a lower orbit than OSCAR 7, is the more seriously af- 
fected of the two. 

If the drag factor is not considered when OSCAR calculations are 
performed, long-range orbital projections will be in error, For exam- 
pie. by the end of 1979, OSCAR 8 was more than 20 minutes ahead 
of some published schedules. The nature of orbital mechanics is 
such that extra drag on a satellite causes it to move into a lower or- 
bit, resulting in a shorter orbital period. Thus, the satellite arrives 
above a given Earthbound location earlier than predicted. 

Using data supplied to us by Dr. Thomas A. Clark W3IWI of AM* 
SAT, the equatorial crossing tables shown here were generated 
with the aid of a TRS-SOTM microcomputer. The tables take into ac- 
count the effects of atmospheric drag and should be in error by a 
few seconds at most. 

The listed data tells you the time and place that OSCAR 7 and 
OSCAR 8 cross the equator in an ascending orbit for the first time 
each day. To calculate successive OSCAR 7 orbits, make a list of 
the first orbit number and the next twelve orbits for that day. List the 
time of the first orbit. Each successive orbit is 115 minutes later 
(two hours less five minutes). The chart gives the longitude of the 
day's first ascending (northbound) equatorial crossing, Add 29° for 
each succeeding orbit. When OSCAR is ascending on the other side 
of the world from you T it will descend over you. To find the 



equatorial descending longitude, subtract 166° from the ascending 
longitude. To find the time OSCAR 7 passes the North Pole, add 29 
minutes to the time it passes the equator. You should be able to 
hear OSCAR 7 when it is within 45 degrees of you. The easiest way 
to determine if OSCAR is above the horizon (and thus within range) 
at your location is to take a globe and draw a circle with a radius of 
2450 miles (4000 kilometers) from your QTH. If OSCAR passes 
above that circle, you should be able to hear it, If it passes right 
overhead, you should hear it for about 24 minutes total. OSCAR 7 
will pass an imaginary line drawn from San Francisco to Norfolk 
about 12 minutes after passing the equator. Add about a minute for 
each 200 miles that you live north of this line. If OSCAR passes 15° 
east or west of you t add another minute; at 30° T three minutes; at 
45°, ten minutes. Mode A; U5.85*,95 MHz uplink, 29.4-29.5 MHz 
downlink, beacon at 29.502 MHz. Mode B: 432.125^.175 MHz uplink, 
145.975-.925 MHz downlink, beacon at 145.972 MHz. 

At press time, OSCAR 7 was scheduled to be in Mode A on odd 
numbered days of the year and in Mode B on even numbered days. 
Monday is QRP day on OSCAR 7 T while Wednesdays are set aside 
for experiments and are not available for use, 

OSCAR 8 calculations are similar to those for OSCAR 7, with 
some important exceptions. Instead of making 13 orbits each day. 
OSCAR 8 makes 14 orbits during each 24-hour period. The orbital 
period of OSCAR 8 is therefore somewhat shorter: 103 minutes. 

To calculate successive OSCAR 8 orbits, make a list of the first 
orbit number (from the OSCAR B chart) and the next thirteen orbits 
for that day. List the time of the first orbit. Each successive orbit is 
then 103 minutes later. The chart gives the longitude of the day's 
first ascending equatorial crossing- Add 26° for each succeeding 
orbit. To find the time OSCAR 8 passes the North Pole, add 26 
minutes to the time it crosses the equator. OSCAR 8 will cross the 
imaginary San Francisco-to-Norfolk line about 11 minutes after 
crossing the equator. Mode A: 145.8S-.95 MHz uplink, 29,4-29,50 
MHz downlink, beacon at 29-40 MHz. Mode J: 1 45 J0-1 46.00 MHz 
uplink, 435.20-435.10 MHz downlink, beacon on 435090 MHz, 

OSCAR 8 is in Mode A on Mondays and Thursdays. Mode J on 
Saturdays and Sundays, and both modes simultaneously on Tues- 
days and Fridays. As with OSCAR 7, Wednesdays are reserved lor 
experiments. 



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** Reader Service— see page 146 



73 Magazine * February, 1981 25 



M 



FUN! 




John Edwards WB21BE 
7&56 86th Street 
Giendate NY 11385 



DXingi Some ca\\ it a passion, others call it an addiction; many 
call it nothing at all and blithely work W8s and KA6s. Whatever your 
personal opinion, it's evident that DXing is a primary motivating 
force behind all of amateur radio. After all. even if you don't work DX, 
chances are it still directly affects your day-to-day hamming. (Ever 
try to work a friend in another state on 14.210?) 

When did DXing start? Probably the first time a ham attempted to 
work a station over a distance greater than to his neighbor. Legend 
has it that the first pile-up occurred the following day; Want to learn 
more? Read on. 

ELEMENT 1 -CROSSWORD PUZZLE 
(Illustration 1) 



Across 

1 Famous DXpedition island 

8 Lebanese prefix 

9 Prefix of 1 across 

10 Japanese rig: rice 

12 Father Moran's country 

14 Over 

15 Greenland— MARS prefix 

16 Region 1 continent (abbr,) 

19 International radio regula- 
tors (abbr,) 

20 Ten, at night, on cycle's 
bottom 



21 Greek prefix 

23 DXer's reaction to hearing a 

new country 
26 Home QTH for many 
28 OSCAR group (abbr.) 

30 Morse question mark 

31 Egyptian prefix 

33 Italian prefix 

34 Time when you want QSLs 
37 Foreign QSL clearinghouse 

(2 words) 
41 WARCsite 
43 Four-land state (abbr.) 



1 


2 






3 




r 1 

4 


5 




6 




7 II 


8 








__ 




[10 


11 




12 




13 








14 




ia 


15 








19 




16 




17 


















30 








21 


22 


^H 


24 




25 






26 




27 






32 


28 










30 






31 




33 






34 


35 


36 




37 


38 


39 


A0 






41 










42 




43 












44 






46 




47 

























44 Good night (abbr) 
47 DX operating technique 
(2 words) 

Down 

1 Competitive pastime 

2 Mystery signal (abbr,) 

3 DX operating trap 

4 Rig's output (abbr) 

5 5V-land 

6 Noise blanker (abbr.) 

7 New country journey 
11 Greenland prefix 

13 Canadian Island (abbr.) 
17 the list 



18 Rare DX makes this 
22 Test item (abbr.) 

24 Operating establishment 
(abbr.) 

25 Turkish prefix 

27 Top scorer in DX contest 
29 Gel on the 

35 Austrian prefix 

36 Eight-land state (abbr.) 

38 RevWa Gigedo's prefix 

39 Radar image 

40 Soviet prefix 

42 CW *'once more" 

45 No good (abbr.) 

46 Irish prefix 



Illustration 1. 



ELEMENT 2— MULTIPLE CHOICE 

1} On what frequency will you find the Afrikaner Net? 

1)14.230 MHz 
2) 14.250 MHz 
3)21.355MHz 
4) 28.510 MHz 

2) WWV transmits solar activity bulletins: 

1) 12 minutes before the hour 

2) 18 minutes before the hour 

3) 18 minutes after the hour 

4) WWV does not transmit solar activity bulletins 

3} We are currently experiencing solar cycle: 

1)21 
2)41 
3)610 
4)20 

4) 160-meter DXers have to compete against LORAN generated QRM 
to find weak signals. Although this nuisance Is now on the way out, 
it still pays to know your enemy. Therefore, what is LORAN an 
acronym for? 

1) Liquid Oxygen Radio— And Nitrogen 

2) Long Range Navigation 

3) Low Ocean Radiation Aided Navigation 

4) Long Radio Antenna 

5) Which country listed below does not have a third-party agreement 
with the US government? 

1) Cuba 

2) Bolivia 

3) Israel 
4) Belize 

6) Who was the first amateur to snag DXCC on 6-meters? 

1) WB2LWJ 
2)W2lDZ 

3) W6AM 

4) No amateur has ever worked 100 countries on 6 

7) What phone frequencies are allocated to European (except Soviet) 
amateurs? 

1)3.6*3.8 MHz 

2) 3,5-4.0 MHz 

3) 3.5-3.8 MHz 

4) 3.7-3.8 MHz 

8} The term "master of ceremonies'* (MC), when applied to DXing, 
refers to: 

1) A DX operator 

2) A QSL manager 

3) A person in charge of organizing a DX list 

4) A [fd who disrupts a net 

Continued on page 115 



26 73 Magazine ■ February, 1981 



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Scanning control from microphone 

Highly effective noise blanker 

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LETTERS 



BASH VS. FAA 



The letters in reply to the Sep- 
tember article on Dick Bash indi- 
cate there are many different 
views on the propriety of his 
publishing the questions and 
answers to the various amateur 
radio tests. 

It is interesting to note that at 
least two readers had compari- 
sons with the FAA written tests. 
and 1 agree in principle with Mr. 
Remont and his opinion, "You 
must literally learn the test" in 
order to pass them, 

Mr. Mauser, however, has not 
done his homework regarding 
manuals on the FAA written 
tests, I've Identified at least 16 
written test guides published by 
the FAA itself. These test guides 
cover the pilot written tests from 
private pilot to airplane trans- 
port ratings, the instrument and 
instructor ratings, pfus flight 
engineer and navigator ratings* 

Most of the later FAA written 
test guides are formatted very 
similar to the actual written 
tests, with the subject areas cor* 
responding to those on the test, 
including questions that may 
even be word for word with the 
actual test questions, even to 
the four multiple-choice an- 
swers. 

On the last FAA written test 
that I took, the commercial pilot 
exam, I believe that 32 of the 60 
questions on the test were iden- 
tical to the ones in the study 
guide. But bear in mind that the 
FAA has a slightly different ap- 
proach to their written tests. The 
actual test booklet has, in the 
case of commercial pilot, 600 
questions, but the test itself has 
only 60 questions, and the test 
sheet given to the applicant indi- 
cates which of the questions the 
applicant must answer. 

The FAA written test guides 
do not have the answers indi- 
cated, but at least two aviation 
ground school operations have 
published answers and explana- 
tions in booklets available to the 
public. In addition, any pilot 
wishing to take weekend 
"cram" courses for an exam can 
find them within easy driving 
distance almost any weekend. 



Yes, I suppose a person could 
pass an FAA written exam by 
memorization. But if a person 
memorized the 600 questions, 
surely he would have some un- 
derstanding of what the FAA re- 
quires an airman to know. 

But there is one more thing to 
consider. An applicant for an 
FAA written test has to produce 
evidence, a certificate or state- 
ment from a flight or ground 
school instructor that the appli- 
cant has undergone a course of 
Instruction preparing him for the 
exam to be taken. This pre- 
cludes an airman from simply 
memorizing the test guide, and 
then taking the FAA written test, 

I hold a commercial pilot's li- 
cense with multi-engine, land, 
and instrument ratings, 

Sheldon Daitch WA4MZZ 
Greenville NC 



HORDES OF LIDS 



] 



I would like to comment on 
certain readers' reactions to 
Dick Bash's interview in 73: How 
soon we forget i Anyone who re- 
members the old (small-format, 
black-cover) ARRL License 
Manual will recognize Bash's 
book as approximately the 
same thing only with more accu* 
rate questionsianswers. I don't 
remember anyone taking the 
League to task for publishing 
the old-format Manual (not to be 
confused with the new one 
which might teach theory but 
does nothing to help you pass 
the test). And, what of those 
"schools" that drill you on ques- 
tions and answers so you can 
pick up a First Phone? I've met 
graduates of these "schools" 
that barely know the difference 
between ac and del 

l t like most who took the Ex- 
tra, noticed that technical com- 
petence alone would not get you 
a passing grade— you needed to 
know how to interpret the con- 
fusing semantics of the test 
questions. 

As for the fears that the Bash 
approach of licensing will pro- 
duce hordes of lids, I would like 
to have those of you who feel 
this way tune in to the average 
DX pile-up on the low end of 20m 
phone. And a lot of these guys 



are old-timers! You'll notice thai 
the FCC exam says nothing 
about tact, diplomacy, etc., in 
operating! 

Amateur radio is something 
that is learned by doing, not 
memorizing. If you have to mem- 
orize to pass the test, so what! 
Your real learning begins the 
moment you first press a trans^ 
mil switch. 

Fred Heisler K5FH 
New Orleans LA 



[ 



PASS THE WORD 



We departed California on 1 
October, 1960, and ftew directly 
to Athens, Greece. The next 10 
days were spent clearing cus- 
toms and obtaining our li- 
censes. 

It was only through the efforts 
of SVUG and SVfoAA that we 
got our licenses that fast. Any- 
one going to Greece should ap- 
ply at least 2 months before arri- 
val 

We got on the air from Crete 
Island as W6KG/SV9 on 12 Octo- 
ber and by 26 October we had 
9500 QSOs, half phone and half 
CW. We worked stations in 142 
countries and were on ail bands 
permitted in Greece. 

160 meters is not permitted 
yet for use by Greek amateurs. 
Operation on 40 meters is lim- 
ited to 7000 kHz through 7100 
kHz, and on 80 meters to 3,500 
kHz through 3,600 kHz. We were 
on 48 hours in the CQ World- 
Wide phone contest and made 
the highest score for Crete, 

The tourist business is a ma- 
jor industry in Greece, and, as a 
result, all of the islands have 
great numbers of hotels and ev- 
eryone in the hotels and shops 
speaks English, 

We try to use Lloyd's call in 
one country and Iris's call in the 
next. From here, we go to 
Rhodes Island in the Dodeca- 
nese and will use Iris's call there 
as W6GU5V5. 

We expect to be on the air al- 
most continuously for 6 months 
— please pass the word to every- 
one. 

Lloyd Colvin W6KG 
IrisCoMnWBOL 
Castro Valley CA 



FINALLY PASSED 



] 



I'm sure that by this time ev- 
eryone is tired of reading letters 
about FCC exams and Dick 
Bash, but If you will permit me, I 



should like to offer some of my 
observations and experiences. 

After failing the General class 
exam three times, 1 was soroly 
tempted to buy a copy of The 
Final Exam. Ail that prevented 
me was the fact that the publica- 
tion was unavailable. All stores 
and mail-order companies were 
sold out and had no idea when 
new copies would be available, 
since a revision was in the works 
due to new FCC exams. 

Why was I so tempted? Here's 
why; The second time I f ai led the 
test, I went home and wrote 
down the gist of every question 1 
could remember from the test. I 
came up with 47 out of 50. 1 still 
failed! My contention, and my 
biggest complaint, is I failed 
simply because I had no way of 
knowing which answers were 
wrong! Since the FCC examiner 
will not allow applicants to see 
their corrected tests, 1 think I 
kept missing the same 14 ques- 
tions! 

When I finally passed this 
week, I missed 9, but I sure 
couldn't tell you which 5 ques- 
tions I finally answered correct- 
ly! I guess l was lucky to pass at 
all, but since I was given the ex- 
act same exam every time, may- 
be I |ust finally eliminated all the 
wrong answers on the "guess" 
questions. (Four possible an- 
swers, four attempts; the law of 
averages caught up with me.) 

I'm sure that some will say 
that since I had managed to re* 
member most of the questions, I 
should have been able to re* 
search the correct answers, but 
the FCC "trick; 1 or what I con- 
sidered to be vaguely worded 
questions, defied research. I 
asked my husband (a long-time 
electronics and radio hobbyist). 
Advanced class hams, and even 
my brother-in-law, who just 
spent tour years working com- 
munications in the Navy, and 
could come up with no answers. 
1 am not an electronic-minded 
whiz kid, and I guess I'm just 
lucky the General exam is most- 
ly rules, regulations, and prop- 
agation. Otherwise I would be a 
Novice for life. 

I know that there are ama- 
teurs who have no use for the 
"social 11 operators, but I am 
proud to be a radio amateur, and 
though 1 have great respect for 
anyone holding an amateur li- 
cense (especially Advanced and 
Extras), I feel that I am t In my 
own "social" way, contributing 
to the "advancement of skills In 

Continued on page 122 



28 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



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73 Magazine • February, 1981 2y 



A/EIV PRODUCTS 



NEW AUTOMATIC 
ANTENNA TUNER 

A new automatic antenna 
tuner for use with amateur, com- 
mercial, and government com- 
munications systems has been 
introduced by the J. W. Miller 
Division of Bell Industries. 

Auto-Track Model AT2500 an* 
tenna tuners can handle power 
in excess of 2500 Watts PEP 
over a frequency range con- 
tinuous from 3 to 30 MHz. 
Average automatic tune-up time 
is 15 seconds. 

Front panel switch positions 
permit the use of three coaxial 
antenna outputs, one long-wire 
antenna, and one coaxial tuner 
bypass. Impedance is 10-300 
Ohms. A direct-reading swr 
meter on the front panel is cali- 
brated from 1:1 to infinity. 

The panel meter displays rms 
power with continuous earner 
and automatically displays 
peak when in the S3B mode in 
ranges of 0-250 Watts and 
0-2500 Watts. 

Additional information may 
be obtained from Curt Henius, J. 
W. Miller Division of Belt In- 
dustries, 19070 Reyes Avenue, 
Campion CA 90224. Reader Ser- 
vice number 483. 

FT-480R TWOMETER 
SSB/CW/FM TRANSCEIVER 

Yaesu's FT-480R is a compact 
SSB/CW/FM transceiver for the 
two-meter operator. Rated at 
30- Watts PEP input on SSB, 
30-Watts dc input on CW and 
FM r the FT-480R covers 143,5- 
148.5 MHz t with two vfos provid- 



ing coverage of repeaters not 
using the standard +600-kHz 
split which is built Into the set. 
The microcomputer circuitry 
built into the FT^480R allows 
ease of operation. For example, 
when tuning on SSB/CW, the fre- 
quency synthesizer automati- 
cally tunes at 10 H2, 100 Hz, or 1 
kHz per step (three rates avail- 
able), or 1 kHz, 20 kHz, and 100 
kHz per step on FM. At the flick 
of a switch, you can zero the 
display to an even-channel step 
(when switching from SSB to 
FM), thus avoiding the nuisance 
of being a few hundred Hertz 
away from a "standard" chan- 
nel when changing modes. 

The rig has four memories 
wtth priority channel operation, 
scanning from the microphone, 
a noise blanker, high/low power 
selection on CW/FM, and provi- 
sion for changing frequency dur- 
ing transmission, A matching 
external power supply, the 
FP-80, is available for ac opera- 
tion. 

For further information, write 
Yaesu Electronics Corporation, 
15954 Downey Ave., PO Box 498, 
Paramount CA 90723. Reader 
Service number 482. 

THE 173D PRESENTATION 
MODEL CLOCK 

Benjamin Michael Industries, 
inc .. has announced the addi- 
tion of the 1730 Presentation 
Model clock to its line of quartz 
digital timepieces. The 173D will 
be of particular interest to those 
involved in the aviation or com- 
munications industries where 




The FT-480R two-meter SSB/CW/FM transceiver 



both local and Greenwich Mean 
Time (Zulu) is needed. 

The 1730 is a wall or desk 
piece which contains two inde- 
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movements. Greenwich Mean 
Time is displayed in the proper 
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mat with am/pm indicators. 
Both large displays are of the 
LCD type for easy viewing and 
low power consumption. The 
173D features quartz-crystat ac- 
curacy along with one year of 
operation on a single, standard 
penlight battery. The clock 
comes in a solid walnut case; 
the face plate is gold anodized. 
brushed aluminum. 

For more information, con- 
tact Benjamin Michael In- 
dustries, Inc., 65 East Palatine 
Road, Prospect Heights IL 
60070, Reader Service number 
480. 

NEW TEN-TEC DUMMY LOAD 
IS AIR COOLED 

A new rf dummy load from 
TenTec is air cooled for clean* 



easy use around the shack in 
testing and alignment. It is rated 
at 300 Watts for 30 seconds. A 
derating curve is included for us- 
ing the dummy toad over periods 
of time up to a 5-minute max- 
imum. 

Vswr is 1.1:1 maximum from 
0-30 MHz and 1.5:1 maximum 
from 30-150 MHz. 

The Model 209 weighs Vz 
pound and is housed in a 1 3 £"H 
x2 , /4 M Wx6WD aluminum en- 
closure that is perforated with 
wide slots for free air flow and 
dark-painted for more effective 
heat dissipation. An SO-239 coax 
connector is built in for conve- 
nient installation. 

For more information, con- 
tact Ten-Tec, tnc. t Highway 411 
East, Sevterviite TN 37862. 

NEW HAMTRONICS KITS 

Hamtronics r has announced 
a new single-channel UHF FM 
exciter called the model T451, 
Patterned after the T450 exciter, 
the new unit is rated at 2-Watts 
continuous output and is con* 
tained on a 3 x 5V* inch PC 

Continued on page 120 





A Bell Industries antenna tuner. 



The Benjamin Michael 1730 Presentation Model clock. 



30 73 Magazine • February, 19B1 






YAESU 
ICOM 

TEN-TEC 
TEMPO 



* 



* 



DRAKE 
DENTRON 

COLLINS 

INFO-TECH 

SWAN 








CALL TOLL-FREE 




v Reader Service — seepage 146 



73 Magazine ■ February. 1981 31 



REVIEW 



CROWN MICROPRODUCTS 
ROM-116 RTTY INTERFACE 
AND OPERATING SYSTEM 

There are many changes and 
technical Improvements taking 
place in amateur radio these 
days, and some of the most pro- 
found changes are in the field of 
radioteletype (RTTY). One could 
say that the electronic revolu- 
tion Is taking place a little late in 
RTTY, but there can be no ques- 
tion about it; it is taking place. 
The noise and aggravation of 
mechanical RTTY gear has kept 
many hams from trying out this 
fascinating mode, but it is time 
to reexamine the situation. Elec* 
tronic technology is arriving in 
force, and there are several 
manufacturers producing total- 
ly silent RTTY equipment that 
either incorporates a microcom- 
puter on board or interfaces 
with one of the popular micro- 
computers such as the Apple, 
TRS-80, Pet, etc. There are many 
advantages other than silent op- 
eration, however, and the Crown 
Microproducts ROM-116 RTTY 
interface and operating system 
is a perfect example of what can 
be done with a microcomputer. 
With no further delay, let's ex- 
amine this system and find out 
how easy and, indeed, how 
much fun RTTY operation can 
be. 

The ROM-116 is an interface 
board and computer program 
that allows a TRS-8G microcom- 
puter to operate as a computer- 
ized solid-state teletype ma- 
chine. You connect a trans- 
ceiver and demodulator to the 



ROM-116 and the ROM-116 to 
your TRS-80, and you will be very 
close to RTTY heaven. The 
capabilities of the system are al- 
most unbelievable; it appears to 
incorporate every feature the 
avid RTTY operator could de- 
sire, yet it is not a complicated 
system to operate. 

Like many RTTY systems with 
video displays, the ROM-116 
operates with a split-screen sys- 
tem, Received text is displayed 
on the top half of the monitor, 
and a message can be pre-typed 
in the advanced typing mode on 
the bottom portion. On the right 
side of the screen is a contin- 
uous display of program status, 
letting you know whether you 
are In the receive or transmit 
mode, in the ASCII or Baudot 
mode, baud rate t line printer 
on/off, and a host of other infor- 
mational items. A quick glance 
at the status display will reas- 
sure you that everything is doing 
what it's supposed to be doing 
(or it will warn you that it's not!). 
Also displayed on-screen is the 
date and time. This information 
is simply entered via the key- 
board whenever you power-up 
the system. The date and the 
correct time will then appear on 
the screen, and each time the 
system automatically indent!- 
ties, the date and the correct 
time will be transmitted. A nice 
touch! 

If you look at the picture for 
more than a second, you'll real- 
ize that the ROM-116 has only 
one switch: the power on/off 
switch. That's right, friends, the 




The Crown Microproducts ROM-tie RTTY Interface and Operating 
System. 



ROM-116 accomplishes every* 
thing under software control, 
Each of the many functions that 
this unit performs is selected by 
typing a code into the keyboard. 
All commands use a shift and a 
character, so it is unlikely you'll 
tell it to do something by acci- 
dent. If you enter a shift T, for ex- 
ample, the computer will turn on 
the transmitter, send a CW ID, 
and then send anything you 
have typed into the text buffer. 
Shift K will accomplish the 
same thing, only a CW ID will not 
be sent unless it has been ten 
minutes since the last ID* This 
thing even keeps you legal! 

All the other functions of the 
ROM-116 are accessed in the 

same manner. Like many other 
products in our digital age, 
you 1 !! have to commit the com- 
mand codes to memory or else 
use a cheat sheet that tells you 
what to enter for a particular 
function. At first, you might wish 
that separate switches had 
been used for each function, but 
as you grow accustomed to the 
system, youll be thankful the 
ROM*116 uses the direct 
keyboard entry system for all 
commands. 

With this system, you'll have 
plenty of commands I The pro* 
gram allows for three memory 
buffers. If you have a 16K 
TRS-80, the main text buffer will 
hold about 7,000 characters. A 
general-purpose buffer for brag 
tapes, CQs, and anything else 
you send frequently hotds ap- 
proximately 2500 characters. 
Finally, there is a callsign buffer 
that will hold up to 140 charac- 
ters. All these memories are 
held In the computer, not on 
tape, so you don't have to go 
through a complicated loading 
procedure every time you want 
to send the contents of a par- 
ticular buffer. If you program all 
the pertinent details about your 
station into the brag-tape buffer, 
you can send thai information at 
any point in the text by typing 
"shift C". Naturally, while that 
buffer is being sent, you can 
continue typing into the main 
text buffer As soon as all the in- 
formation in the brag-tape buf- 
fer is sent, the system will send 
whatever else you've typed in. 
The callsign buffer works the 
same way. Anyone who has 
used a cassette-tape lash-up to 
store messages will quickly ap- 
preciate this ease of operation! 

You can, however, use the 
TRS-80 cassette tape recorder 
for simple and dependable stor- 



age of incoming data, and this 
brings us to one of the most fas- 
cinating features of the 

ROM-116. 

When you initialize the 
system for the first time during 
an operating session, you are 
asked to enter a selcal code. 
This can be a word, a number, or 
any combination thereof. Now 
suppose you leave the shack 
someday t with your equipment 
turned on and tuned to 14J0O 
MHz, It anyone transmits GST, 
your call, or your selcal code on 
this frequency, the received text 
will be written to cassette, 
following the receipt of four Ns. 
The system will ignore any other 
activity that takes place on that 
frequency. But wart, it gets bet- 
ter! If someone sends your 
selcal code and the letters ZM t 
your system will switch over to 
transmit, CW ID if necessary, 
and send whatever you have 
typed into the general-purpose 
buffer "ZG" will send 10 lines of 
"quick brown fox." "ZW" will 
send "WRIT, and "ZY* will send 
10 lines of "RYRY". Pretty inv 
pressive! When you come home, 
play back the tape and see what 
your friends (or enemies) have 
sent you, It doesn't take too ac- 
tive an imagination to think of 
all the fun you can have with 
this, 

At this point you probably are 
worried about hooking up all 
this glorious luxury. Surprising- 
ly, it doesn't take long at all. I do 
encourage anyone hooking up 
this system for the first time to 
read the manual very carefully. 
The manual is very complete 
and well written; nothing is left 
to chance. Although my experi- 
ence with microcomputers and 
RTTY gear was somewhat lim- 
ited at the time, I had no diffi- 
culties hooking up the various 
control cables. Everything went 
smoothly and worked the first 
time. Once you have had the 
system for a while, you might 
want to examine the back sec- 
tion of the manual and try out 
some of the goodies that can be 
done with the ROM-116- Modem 
operation, TRS-80 as a host 
computer, and operation on 
time-sharing systems are just 
some of the things that are pos- 
sible. 

While the forte of the ROM- 
116 is RTTY, it comes with a 
pretty sophisticated CW pro- 
gram as well. Received copy 
was acceptable, but to quote 

Continued on page $5 



32 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



A superb frequency counter 

is frequently not counted- just because 
it doesn't have a high price-tag. 




The truth is, our 8000B 
1 Gigahertz is an excellent counter. In 
fact, it's preferred by many engineers, 
technicians, and electronic enthus- 
iasts* Not a single competitor on the 
market today can surpass our price/ 
performance ratio. 

And we've deliberately kept our 
prices down. First, we've refused to 
join everybody else in their high mark 
ups. Instead of "charge what the mar- 
ket will bear, " for us it's "charge a fair 
price, " Second, we sell what we man- 
ufacture, directly to you . So extra 
costs of extra steps are automatically 
eliminated. Third, we have to build a 
lot of frequency counters to meet the 
demand* Because we do seH so many, 
we don't have to charge a high price to 
make a profit. 

And about quality . , . 
Sabtronics frequency counters always 
have the most innovative features 
available. For example, our 8000B 
1 Gigahertz Frequency Counter has a 10 
Megahertz precision crystal timebase. 
But most important, the 8000B, using 
the most advanced LSI circuitry, has a 
guaranteed sensitivity of 30 millivolts 
up to 1 Gigahertz, with 20 millivolts 
typical. The three -stage differential 
amplifier IC makes this possible. Al- 
together, the 8000B uses only 6 IC's, 
making the chance of failure virtually 
nonexistent 





Three selectable gate times pro- 
vide the measurement speed you need 
— and greater resolution- The resolu- 
tion is further enhanced by our count- 
er's 9-digit display. 

Like the 8000B, Sabtronics* 
8610B is a high-quality precision fre- 
quency counter. It features only 4 IC's, 
and offers a frequency range up to 600 
Megahertz. 

The cases of both counters are 
high strength impact-resistant ABS 
plastic. Elegant but very rugged. 
Sabtronics doesn't believe in skimping 
on the high quality construction that 
brings excellent performance. But 
we're not about to charge a high price 
just because we could get it! 

Send in the coupon and order 
your new frequency counter now. 
Credit card holders may call. 



BRIEF SPECIFICATIONS: 

Frequency Range: 10 Hz to 1 GHz 

(Model SO00B), 10 Hz to 600 MHz 
(Model 8610B); Timebase: 
Frequency: 10 MHz, Stability: ± 1 
ppm (20 to 40C°. I Aging Rate: < 1 
ppm/year; Sensitivity (adjustable): 
Input A< 15 m V to 100 MHz, Input B 
< 30 mV, 100 MHz to 1 GHz (Model 
8000B), < 30 mV, 100 MHz to 600 
MHz (Model 8610B); Gate Times: J 
sec, lsec. t 10 sec; Resolution: 0.1 
Hz to 10MHz, 1 Hz to 100 MHz. 10 Hz 
to 1 GHz; Display; 9-digit LED 0.4"; 
Power Requirements: 4,5 to 6.5 
VDC (4 C-cells) or optional AC 
adapter; Dimensions: 8* wide X6.5" 
deep X 3" high (203 X 165 X 76 mm), 
L3 pounds (590 g) excluding battery. 

Making Performance Affordable 





INTERNATIONAL (NC 



Sabtronics International, tnc .. 5709 N. 50th Street, Tampa. FL 33610, (813) 623-2631, 

Please send me the following. 

, Model BQ0OB 1 GHz Frequency Counter(B), Assembled® S199 00 each 5 



.Model B610B 600 MHz Frequency Counter (s). Assembled @ Si 29 00 each 



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73 Magazine ■ February, 1981 33 



SCR WOO VHF—SCR4000UHF 




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System - && *Witk the Tine&t 




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SCR100 VHF Receiver Board 

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SCR100 Receiver Assembly 

• SCR 100 mount td in shielded housing 

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FL-6 



FL*6 Rcvr. Front-End Preselector 

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ID1000 Automatic Base 
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Winter Olympics Torch Run 



a one-year perspective 



Editor's Note: In the May, 1980, Q$T t one participant's view was presented of amateur radio's part in the Winter Olympics Torch Relay 
Run* Due, in part to more detailed explanations of the project's complexity and the many amateurs' responsibilities, we believe the story 
presented here lends a different perspective to and perhaps better captures the spirit of involvement of all those who had a hand in this 
historic event. 



Amateur radio made 
important contribu- 
tions last year to the Olym- 
pic effort at Lake Placid, 



A great deal of traffic 
handling and commemora- 
tive operating took place 
with the Winter Olympic 



Radio Amateur Network 
(WORAN) and its station, 

W0RAIM Amateurs also 
performed admirably dur- 




Photo A, The beginning amateur operating contingent in Yorktown poses for the obliga- 
tory group shot Standing from left: W1RM, WA3PZO, KB3HF, KA2DBW, WB1ADL(on 
right); kneeling from left: WB3HWZ, K2AMU, KA2CNN, WB3EOU, WB3LCC, WA2DHF, 

WB2VUK, K2AV. 



ing the Winter Olympic 
Torch Relay Run. 

We were among the ama- 
teur operators who were 
chosen to accompany the 
Olympic Torch from Lang- 
ley AFB to Lake Placid be- 
tween January 31 and Feb- 
ruary 8. There were over 
1,000 miles and nine days of 
extraordinary operating, 
mostly on VHF. It de- 
manded afl the skill and 
combined experience we 
had in contesting, traffic 
handling, and high-speed 
tactical communications. It 
was something none of us 
will ever forget, and some- 
thing the entire amateur 
community can be proud 
of 

Early in 1979, the Lake 
Placid Olympic Organizing 
Committee (LPOOC) ap- 
proached the ARRL. They 
needed experienced com- 
municators to provide reli- 
able communication for 
the vehicles involved in the 
Torch Relay Run. The Run 
had been organized, tn an 
attempt to publicize the 
coming of the Olympics to 
the US and to Lake Placid, 



36 73 Magazine * February, 1981 



s a combined public rela- 
ons and educational ef* 
Drt. It would be the first 
me the genuine Olympic 
ame, kindled in the tern- 
le of Hera from the rays of 
le sun in Olympia, Greece, 
ad been on American soil 
he earlier Olympic flames 
lisplayed in this country 
^ere ceremonial dupli- 
ates). Ham radio was re- 
arded as the most appro- 
priate source for trained 
iperators for a number of 
easons. not the least of 
vhich was the fact that 
lams, like the athletes, are 
skilled amateurs who sacri- 
iced a great deal of time 
ind money for the thrill of 
)ublic service contribu- 
ions and competition. 

It was a tall order to fill 
Dver 75 people in 11 ve- 
licles, some of which 
A^ould be as far as 100 
miles apart, were needed 
to keep in touch constantly 
to coordinate their many 
and varied activities. Each 
little town on the Relay's 
route had planned its own 
ceremony to honor the 
passing of the torch, and 
these ceremonies needed 
to be coordinated with the 
scheduling, the program, 
and the safety require- 
ments of the moving cara- 
van within which the torch- 
bearers were to run. This 
coordination would have 
been impossible through 
any medium other than 
ham radio. Lunches had to 
be found and picked up, 
and then the vehicle with 
the lunches had to find the 
moving caravan again. 
Ham radio had to deal with 
scouting for fuel, with 
command and policy com- 
munications, vehicular 
repairs, rest-room stop 
arrangements, and liaison 
with state and local law en- 
forcement agencies Liter- 
ally hundreds of events 
each day had to be con- 
trolled in a coordinated 
fashion. 

Safety communication 
was our highest priority. 
With eleven vehicles on 



two-lane roads in curving, 
hilly terrain, allowing 
vehicles to pass around the 
caravan became a prob- 
lem. If the torchbearers 
stumbled, the entire 
caravan would have to 
come to an immediate halt 
to avoid running over 
them. Crisp, sharp — and 
secure — communications 
clearly were required. Bad 
weather had to be antici- 
pated—but we were lucky 
in this potential problem 
area. 

The operators who were 

chosen to accompany the 
torchbearers and staff 
were selected on the basis 
of their experience in con- 
test operating (which bore 
many similarities to the 
type of operating we would 
be undertaking), traffic 
handling, and walkathon- 
and marathon-type operat- 
ing. It included many with 
experience handling com- 
munications for the New 
York City Marathon, in- 
cluding the communica- 
tions coordinator for that 
event, Steve Mendelsohn 




Photo B. The early-morning arrival of the Olympic flame, 
during a snowstorm, in a State Department aircraft similar 
to Air Force One, on January 31, 1980, at Langley Air Force 
Base, 



WA2DHF. The hundreds of 
amateurs who provided in- 
valuable support commu- 
nications along the route 
while the caravan was in 
their area are regrettably 
too numerous to be men- 
tioned. The traveling oper- 
ators were drawn mostly 
from the upstate New York, 
northern New Jersey; New 



York City, Baltimore, Phila- 
delphia, Wilmington, and 
southern Connecticut 
areas. 

The runners numbered 
52 — one trom each state 
plus one each from the Dis- 
trict of Columbia and Lake 
Placid. Evenly divided be- 
tween men and women, 
they were chosen from 



Literally scores of amateurs and their families along our route helped in various support capacities, 
performing tasks ranging from repair of broken rigs to transportation of emissary runners from pface 
to place, to donations of equipment for our temporary use, to relay from VHF to HF to maintain our 
contact with WORAN and Link Nixon in Lake Placid. Although it would be impossible to acknowledge 
all of those who played important roles in this effort, here are the calls of many without whom the 
traveling team would have been isolated and crippled. 

Maryland, Delaware, District of Columbia 



K3AHB 


W3BCN 


KA3BKW 


WA3BPC 


W3ENL 


W3FA 


K3HBP 


WB3FOE 


WB3GXD 


WA3HQX 


W3JAC 


W3KDD 


VV3NF3 


WB3ENF 


K3RA 


K3RKU 


AE7T/3 


W3TCI 


W3XE 


K3UAV 


WR3ABA 


WR3AFM/YV3RUN 




WR3ADH 






Virginia 














WA4CCK 


N4NK 


K8LGA 


WR4AAD 


W3BBN/4 


N4CCF 


WD4FTK 


KA4FVB 


KA4GAV 


WB4MAE 


K4MU 


W4NTG 


WA4RBC 


WB4SHK 


WB4UHC 


K4BKX 


WR4AFT 


WR4BBZ 


WB4DNT7R 


W4NTG/R 


K4VYN/R 


W4ZA/R 














Pennsylvania 


i 












WA3AOP 


N3AYK 


WB3ELA 


W3NWA 


WA3PZO 


AG3R 




and literally 1 


lundreds of other hams . 










New Jersey 














K2ASF 


K2ASG 


N2BBL 


AA2C 


KA2CHM 


KA2DOH 


WB2ZRU 


KB2ET 


N2GJ 


N2GX 


AA2H 


KB2HM 


WB2HON 


K2ASF/R 


WB2HZR 


VVB2JHN 


K2JJM 


AF2L 


WB2LCC 


WA2MVQ 


AF2UR 


WB2SZI 


WB2TZS 


K2UL 










New York 














N2DU 


N2FU 


K2GDX 


W2GH 


W2GN 


W2CS 


WA2AAU 


W2HQW 


WB2JDD 


WA2JHU 


WA2KDE 


WB2NEA 


W20DC 


Wl BQO 


WB2PID 


KA2Q 


WB2GCJ 


K2RJN 


WA2RXQ 


W2SZ 


WB3BPU 


KB2T 


K2TR 


W2TJ 


WA1UGE/2 


WB2VJC 


W1VSA 


WB2CFP 


WA2WNI 


N2YL 


WA1ZYV/2 


WR2ABB 


WR2ACD 


WR2ADZ 


WB2CJS 


K2AE/R 


WR2AFS 


WR2ALY 


W2CXX/R 


WA2CZT/R 


WB2ERS/R 


W2LWX/R 


WB2FNV/R 


W1KOO/R 













73 Magazine • February, 1981 37 




Photo C One of the Chevy Trans-Sport custom vans used 
for Ceremonial Command, and other positions. Having a 
fiberglass body, it required our own ground-piane metal lie 
base with 19-inch radiats attached to the body with duct 
tape. 



among 6000 applicants on 
the basis of personal inter 
views, essays, and their 
running ability. They 
ranged in age from 1 5 to 54 
*ears old. They were organ- 
feed into four teams of 13 
runners each, with two 
teams assigned running du- 
ty each day and the two 
off-duty teams given emis- 
sary functions. The emis- 
saries traveled ahead of 
the caravan making public 
appearances at churches, 
schools, and service and 
social clubs, speaking 
about the Olympic spirit 
and the Relay Run itself. 
Officially, each runner ran 
between three and five 
miles each day, but many 
frequently ran alongside 
the torchbearer or ran after 
we stopped for the night. 

Like the hams, the run- 
ners made the effort re- 
quired for the run at their 
own expense, receiving 
only a uniform, meals, and 
lodging for the duration of 
the run and of the Olym- 
pics. Additionally, and per- 
haps most prized, were the 
Olympic participation 
medals we all received, 
along with certificates of 
appreciation. Runners and 
hams alike either took ex- 
tended vacation or leaves 
of absence from their work 



to take part in this rare op- 
portunity. Any distinction 
between the two groups 
soon faded in view of the 
shared excitement and sat - 
rif ice and was further erod- 
ed as the runners watched 
the amateurs in operation 
and the hams watched the 
runners in all weather, on 
all terrain, bearing the 
torch to Lake Placid. A 
great, solid bond of mutual 
respect developed after 
only a few hours- 
Following personnel se- 
lection, there was a period 
of discussion and practice. 
The runners got together in 
Lake Placid in the summer 
of 1979 to practice the 
technique they would be 
using and to get to know 
one another better. The 
hams weren't so lucky 
where lead time was con- 
cerned. After an initial or- 
ganizational meeting on 
the hard, cold floor at 
Rockefeller Center in Man- 
hattan—to which many 
drove long distances— we 
practiced with a small 
group of the runners This 
practice was a test of the 
last day of the Relay Run 
from Fort Ticonderoga to 
Lake Placid on the Albany 
East route, with a day-long 
recap and critique over the 
weekend of December 8-9, 



This full-scale test was in- 
valuable for the technical 
and organizational lessons 
we learned there Without 
it, we would have been ill- 
prepared for the coming 
trial. 

We learned that because 
of the volume of traffic on 
the circuits, we would have 
to plan for two nets in si- 
multaneous operation. We 
chose 2 meters due to the 
availability of equipment, 
although later we were to 
use 220-MHz simplex for 
part of the operation. One 
net would provide a low- 
power circuit for internal 
caravan safety and coor- 
dination on simplex. The 
other would provide a cir- 
cuit for the external group 
of vehicles [described 
below}, using higher- 
powered rigs and, where 
possible, using repeaters. 
Because of the proximity 
of the two nets in the same 
band, there were, inevita- 
bly, problems with desense 
and FM sideband noise 

Luckily, Dick Frey 

WA2AAU joined the prac- 
tice group at the last 
minute, A competent 
home-brewer and techni- 
cian, Dick constructed 
solutions to the desense 
and sideband problems in 
the short period between 
the practice and the real 
thing. He planned and built 
a narrow passband filter — 
a very sharp one — with a 
bandpass from 144.250 to 
144.450 for use with the 
low-power internal fre- 
quency transceiver. Addi- 
tionally, he procured and 
critically tuned a resonant 
cavity setup for use with 
the external net high-power 
transceiver, to notch out 
the 144.2-144.5 band. In 
use for almo. t three weeks 
under very harsh and de- 
manding operating condi- 
tions, they performed flaw- 
lessly and were the ideal 
answer to our problems. 
Without Dick's effort, his 
advice, oodles of his own 
equipment (220- and 2-me- 
ter rigs and antennas), and 



his investment in time, 
gasoline, and money in this 
effort, it would not have 
worked out, 

Dick's equipment was 
used with two UV3s loaned 
from Drake for the event, 
both of which performed 
perfectly in the demanding 
environment, Side by side, 
both on 2 meters, just 18 
inches and 1 l A MHz away 
from one another, with on- 
ly 3 to 4 feet separating an- 
tennas on the roof of the 
vehicle, intermod and de- 
sense between the two rigs 
was so insignificant as to 
be almost unmeasurable. 
We were very pleased with 
both Dick's filter setup and 
with the performance of 
the Drakes That company 
was also generous in the 
loaning of a TR7 with 
matching vfo and trans- 
match for use in our HF 
setup, described below. 

Other companies also 
loaned various items of 
equipment for our use. Ken- 
wood generously loaned 
four of their new TR- 
2400 synthesized hand- 
les with chargers. Tempo 
came through with four of 
their dependable S-1 band- 
ies with chargers, and Lar- 
sen loaned at least a dozen 
quarter-wave mag-mount 
antennas for 2 meters, 
Needless to say, synthe- 
sized equipment was the 
order of the day; and we all 
brought along what we 
owned if it could be put to 
work in the effort. Longer- 
range vehicles needed 
5/8-wave antennas, and 
they were supplied by 
members of the team who 
owned them. Mobile rigs 
ranged from Heathkit 
2036s to I com, Yaesu, KDK, 
and Tempo equipment. 
One Yaesu FT-207R also 
made the trip in the hands 
of KA2DBW; and in the po- 
lice liaison position it per- 
formed flawlessly on 75% 
charge, 200 mW, 15% duty 
cycle for 8-10 hours. 

The eleven caravan ve- 
hicles—and their corre- 
sponding communications 



38 73 Magazine • February. 1981 




Photo D, The arrangement of the caravan during a prac- 
tice, showing the order of the vehicles, with the torchbear- 
ers visible in front of the second (Command) vehicle. 



positions — all had specific 
duties to perform. They 
were organized into an in- 
ternal and external group 
In order of their travel, the 
police vehicle came first. 
(We called it PD" on the 
air; although we identified 
every ten minutes, the cir- 
cuit was so busy that we re- 
ferred to vehicle designa- 
tions rather than callsigns ) 
Usualfy PD was a state po- 
lice car in which one of our 
team members was placed 
to provide liaison between 
the caravan and the state 
police and, through their 
communications system, 
usually with local jurisdic- 
tions, also. This vehicle 
changed periodically, of 
course, not only at state or 
barracks boundaries, but 
also as different patrolmen 
were relieved, since our 
hours far outlasted their 
shifts. This fact, and their 
prohibition against the in- 
stallation of any electronic 
gear not under their con- 
trol, required the use of an 
op with an HT. In some 
states, getting the state po- 
lice to agree to our place- 
ment of an op in their ve- 
hicles was like pulling 
teeth, But for both the 
liaison function — indis- 
pensable in itself — and for 
safety reasons, it was a re- 
quirement of the Director 
of the Run and, ultimately, 
every jurisdiction agreed 



Usually, the vehicle be- 
hind PD was the Pace ve- 
hicle Its personnel were re- 
sponsible for keeping the 
pace for the very tight 
schedule under which we 
were operating and for 
navigating the course from 
a detailed computer print- 
out. Although the runner 
set the pace, the personnel 
in this vehicle could sug- 
gest, through their PA sys- 
tem, that the runner pick 
up the pace or slow it 
down. They communicat- 
ed the position by check 
point number to the Direc- 
tor at every checkpoint 
and gave speed instruc- 
tions to the other vehicles. 
They also were responsible 
for the calculations of 
ETAs at upcoming events. 
All of this, of course, made 
for a rather high volume of 
traffic on the circuit both 
to and from this vehicle. 

The torchbearer with 
his/her accompanying en- 
tourage, often including lo- 
cal guest runners and, 
sometimes, flagbearers 
(and even the occasional 
ham!), followed the Pace 
vehicle. Here a very deli- 
cate compromise had to be 
struck. Barred from Inter- 
States because of our 
8-minute-mile pace, we 
were traveling on two-lane 
roads, Oncoming traffic, 
only a few feet to the run- 
ners' left, sometimes 




Photo £ From left WA2DHF and KB3HF after about 30 
hours as net controls. 



passed slowly, rubberneck- 
ing, but more often appar- 
ently was oblivious to our 
slow-moving caravan de- 
spite the rotating police 
beacons. We were moving 
closely together, and off as 
far to the right as the shoul- 
der would allow, but a 
great deal of traffic was 
backed up behind us most 
of the time. We frequently 
were pulled off the road by 
the police (when there was 
room to accommodate the 
entire caravan) to allow 
this traffic to pass, but we 
had the frequent problem 
of the maverick crazy driv- 
er who decided his need to 
get around us was greater 
than his own life's value. 

Usually, it seemed, these 
maniacs pulled out on 
curves Soon discovering 
that our long, tight caravan 
and oncoming traffic pro- 
hibited their passing, they 
would abort the pass half- 
way into it and try to 
squeeze into our group. 
We could usually accom- 
modate these turkeys with 
minimum angst; more dan- 
gerous were the times 
when the driver would use 
what to him appeared to be 
the only available clear 
spot in the caravan — 
which, of course, was occu- 



pied by our torchbearer. 

For this reason, we kept 
the Pace and Command ve- 
hicles, with the runner(s) in 
between, as close as possi- 
ble. This brought up anoth- 
er safety problem: If one of 
the runners stumbled, the 
Command vehicle could 
(and on at least one occa- 
sion almost did] run over 
the people involved. A deli- 
cate balance existed. Our 
best drivers followed the 
runner, and transmissions 
on the internal net were 
kept as short as possible to 
allow immediate notice or 
either unauthorized pass- 
ings or of stumbling run- 
ners. 

The Command vehicle 
served many functions. 
With a customized fiber- 
glass Trans-Sport body on a 
Chevy van chassis, primari- 
ly it was transportation for 
the Technical Director of 
the Relay (or, on the Al- 
bany West route, the Assis- 
tant TD) for whom we pro- 
vided eyes, ears, and 
mouthpiece The two nets 
were controlled from this 
vehicle, which contained 
the two UV3s, cavities, fil- 
ters, amplifiers (to 100 W 
for the external transceiv- 
er), and HF gear, on a table 
in the center of the rear 



73 Magazine * February, 1981 39 




Photo F. The first torch hand-off with full ceremony in a 

hangar at Langley AFB. 



area of the van. The NCS 
operators sat in what we 
called the "Hot Seat" for 
the obvious reason that 
this was the most demand- 
ing of positions. They coor- 
dinated the movement of 
all caravan vehicles, relay- 
ing pertinent information 
to and from the TD, ex- 
changing information and 
providing relays between 
the internal and external 
nets, and frequently (but 
inadvertently) by necessity 
acting as the TD in his ab- 
sence, making snap deci- 
sions. 

They were assisted by a 
rather complex home- 
brewed audio setup 
through which either op 
could switch in either or 
both of the nets using 
stereo cans. They also used 
a magnetic chalkboard with 
"shrimpboats" to keep 
track of vehicle placement 
The hot seat was claimed 
by five operators for the en- 
tire run, who rotated into 
and out of the different 
nets They were WA2DHF, 
W1RM, K2AV, KB3HF, and 
WA2SPK. By necessity, 
they frequently had to stay 
glued to their positions for 
twelve to sixteen hours 
without a break — some- 
times longer— and had to 
be dragged out in burlap 
sacks and resuscitated with 
smelling salts. 

Big Macs, Whoppers, and 



other assorted junk foods 
also served as first aid on 
the relay. Hams are, for the 
most part, notorious for 
their eating habits, and 
many diehards on the team 
refused to partake of the 
available fare. This con- 
sisted of oh-so-healthy 
vegetables, fruits, soups, 
lots of prunes, and, above 
all, "fiber/' All of this was, 
of course, concocted with 
the needs of the runners in 
mind and included nary a 
shred of red meat for days 
on end. The chant which 
most frequently broke 
down net discipline on our 
circuits was "Junk food! 
Junk food!", along with the 
sound of growling abdo- 
mens in the background. 
Luckily, the frequency of 
the internal simplex net was 
a closely guarded secret 
ostensibly for reasons of 
avoiding QRM, and this was 
not heard by the general 
public. We hope! 

Command was, to say the 
least crowded. With all the 
equipment wiring, papers, 
and human beings (up to 
seven at a time), it became 
the hell-on-wheels of the 
caravan. There were heater 
problems in the vehicle, to 
add salt to the wounds, and 
the net controllers and staff 
in the vehicle remained 
bundled up throughout 
their shifts Upon entry to 
this vehicle, one was imme- 



diately reminded of an ig- 
loo, smell and all. 

Two Pace Arrow RVs 
served as transportation for 
the 26 athletes running 
each day. Although their 
designations changed dur- 
ing the Relay, they were 
known basically as the on- 
duty "Runner" and off-duty 
"Walker " Each carried 13 
runners and took four shifts 
of on-duty and off-duty 
time each day, Walker was 
for the resting runner crew 
and occasionally would 
travel in the caravan (be- 
hind Command), but usual- 
ly would go ahead to a des- 
ignated checkpoint and 
wait for the caravan to 
catch up, at which time its 
designation might change 
and its crew would go on 
duty- The communicator in 
this position had an easier 
time than most, and it was 
frequently used as a resting 
slot for the radio ops, He or 
she was responsible for the 
relay of the next team ex- 
change checkpoint, among 
other minor duties, 

Runner was kept busy ex- 
changing running teams 
with Pace and jumping 
ahead several miles to the 
next exchange point, The 
op in Runner was kept 
rather busy coordinating 
personnel exchanges, get- 
ting a fresh team ready and 
out, taking head counts of 
those coming aboard, keep- 
ing the athletes informed 
about ceremonies and 
schedules, and communi- 
cating with Command dur- 
ing the leapfrogging, for 
safety coordination. 

Walker usually was fol- 
lowed by a tail PD, sans 
operator, and was some- 
times followed by com- 
ponents of the external 
vehicle contingent tem- 
porarily traveling as part of 
the internal caravan. If 
there were local hams 
traveling with the caravan 
to help provide local liaison 
and relay on HF, their 
vehicles would follow the 
last of the official vehicles 
and precede the tail PD 



escort. This happened fre- 
quently, and the help from 
local hams was invaluable 
to the effort. 

In the external con- 
tingent, the Convoy vehicle, 
another Chevy Trans*Sport 
van, provided trans- 
portation for the Convoy 
Director and the Food and 
Accommodations Coor- 
dinator They were respon- 
sible for the procurement 
and conveyance of our 
meals and the advance 
work concerned with our 
accommodations. We were 
fed well (the above com- 
ments notwithstanding) 
with four square meals or 
more each day — about one 
meal every three to four 
hours — and usually there 
were lots of leftovers. The 
fare was difficult for some 
of us — especially those 
from NYC used to munch- 
ing on famous Nathan's hot 
dogs — but it was thought* 
fully prepared and it even, 
ah, well, it was good] Liking 
carrots can be learned. And 
rosy cheeks are cheery. 
Many of us now have 
healthier eating habits (and 
a few of us have even taken 
up running seriously). 
Often, the food was pre- 
pared by generous residents 
of the towns through which 
we passed, organized by 
church groups. Rotary, Elks, 
or Lions clubs, or, on some 
occasions, the military. 
Sometimes it was pur- 
chased by the Convoy 
Director out of her budget; 
on only one or two occa- 
sions did we have to pay for 
it ourselves. 

Most of the meals were 
arranged for weeks or 
months in advance of our 
arrival. Sometimes we were 
on such a tight schedule 
that the lunches were 
passed in through windows 
by volunteers running 
alongside the caravan. The 
Convoy vehicle became, 
after a few days, a sea of 
sloshing soup and vege- 
tables on the inside Smelly 
and fun, but it threatened 
to short out the ham gear in- 



40 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



stalled there! Hip boots and 
rubber gloves were in order, 
especially during the first 
two days which were non- 
stop for over 40 hours with 
no opportunity to clean up 
until after more than a 
dozen different meals. The 
convoy crew, during that 
first leg from Yorktown VA 
to Baltimore, affectionate- 
ly called themselves the 
"Go-Fer Squad" and almost 
seriously considered never 
eating again 

A large European-style 

touring bus transported 
half of the running team — 
the 26 not running on any 
particular day — to the next 
day's overnight stop, ahead 
usually by 85-100 miles. Al- 
though for the first day an 
operator was placed in this 
position as a communica- 
tor, it was found not to be 
necessary. This vehicle also 
was responsible for trans- 
porting some of the emis- 
sary runners to their speak- 
ing engagements or cere- 
monies further up the route 
of the Run 

The event engendered a 
great deal of interest by the 
media, and we anticipated 
a certain amount of need to 
accommodate its represen- 
tatives. What we were un- 
prepared for was the 
amount of coverage we 
were to receive. It seemed 
to be due to the connection 
the public felt with the sym- 
bol of the international 
Olympic flame and patri- 
otic sentiment, even nation- 
alistic fervor, generated by 
the USSR's invasion and oc- 
cupation of Afghanistan 
and the holding of Amer- 
ican hostages in Iran, The 
media, apparently as taken 
by surprise as we were, 
quickly realized the sensa- 
tional side of this story and 
it became the content of — 
and set the tone for — most 
of the articles written and 
programs aired. Of course, 
this was commonplace dur- 
ing the Olympics them- 
selves, especially where it 
concerned the incredible 
victory of our hockey team 



over the top-rated USSR 
team, but our passage 
marked the first expression 
of this popular ground swell 
of opinion. 

We tried to prepare for 
this onslaught with another 
Pace Arrow set aside espe- 
cially for the purpose of 
public relations. From this 
vehicle, which was usually 
ahead of the caravan by as 
much as three or four hours, 
press kits were dispensed, 
questions were answered, 
and interviews were ar- 
ranged between the runners 
and the media representa- 
tives. The communicator 
here acted as a relay for 
specific questions directed 
back to the caravan and the 
TD on the external net and 
for relay of ETAs and names 
of the runners involved at 
any particular time from 
the TD to the PR staff. Be- 
cause of demands from the 
press passed along to the 
operator, this position fre- 
quently became rather 
high-pressure and busy, es- 
pecially in the larger metro- 
politan areas. 

Although many attempts 
were made to include word 
of the involvement of ama- 
teurs and amateur radio in 
the event, the PR staff was 
not sympathetic to our re- 
quests for publicity regard- 
ing our support. This at- 
titude did not reflect the 
general sentiment of the 
runners or the rest of the 
Relay staff, fortunately, but 
it did mean that many op- 
portunities for positive PR 
regarding our role were lost 
to personalities. There was 
little notice of our effort by 
the national or local media. 
WA2DHF appeared on the 
front page of the New York 
Times on February 5, but 
neither the caption nor the 
Story included his function, 
his role, or his name, or 
identified that hand-held, 
funny-looking box with the 
rubber gizmo. Our uni- 
forms, however, did include 
the ARRL logo and a large 
patch produced for the 
event with "Olympic Torch 




Photo G> KA2DBW on the job in her hometown, New York 
City, on February 4. 



Relay Run" on the top and 
"Amateur Radio" on the 
bottom in large block let* 
ters. All of the vehicles bore 
"Amateur Radio" placards 
in every possible window. 

Many of the questions 
the media asked involved 
the technical aspect of the 
torch itself. It was a special- 
ly-designed instrument con- 
structed specifically for 
relay runners by an Amer- 
ican of Creek ancestry, Jim 
Kalarnaridis. Some 132 of 
the devices were custom- 
manufactured for the 
event. Charged with pro- 
pane, they had a life expec- 
tancy of about 40 minutes 
per charge, and, theoreti- 
cally, could withstand a 
wind of 80 mph. In practice, 
however, we had frequent 
flameouts, and the original 
flame was maintained in a 
series of miner's lamps, 
some with a hole drilled in 
one of the glass panels to 
accommodate a sparkler to 
transfer this original flame 
from lamp to torch Each 
lamp had a life of about 
four to six hours per pro- 
pane charge, and Jim and 
an assistant were kept busy 
almost full-time simply 
charging and maintaining 
the torches we used. The 
flame we saw in Lake 
Placid, which was trotted 
up to the huge gas flame 
bowl at the ceremonial 
stadium by Chuck Kerr, one 



of the torchbearers, was the 
very same flame lit in 
Olympia weeks before and 
carried by our combined 
team up the coast of the 
US. If the flame went out, it 
was relit from one of the 
backup miner's lamps; we 
didn't just flick our Bics. 

Wondering how to get an 
Olympic torch across the 
Atlantic? The Air Force lent 
one of the aircraft used for 
Air Force One — a KC-135 
(military designation for a 
Boeing 707) — for use in 
conveying this most hon- 
ored of guests to our na- 
tion. Inside the plane, sit- 
ting in Jim Kalarnaridis' lap 
and on the floor around 
him, were the six miner's 
lamps, all burning with the 
flame lit at the temple of 
Hera, The plane landed at 
Langley AFB on the morn- 
ing of J anuary 31 and taxied 
to a full multi-service Hon- 
or Guard in a huge hangar, 
in the midst of a snow- 
storm. 

The Torch Arming Vehi- 
cle (aka "Torch" on our cir- 
cuits) was used to transport 
the torch technicians and 
their gear for the long and 
grueling trip. After dark, 
this vehicle could be recog- 
nized by the light of the fre- 
quent spontaneous pro- 
pane flares issuing from the 
open doors of this Santana 
van — reminiscent of the au- 
rora borealis, The commu- 



73 Magazine ■ February, 1961 41 



■ 




Photo H. In gratitude, the amateurs were permitted to 
carry the torch on the frosty fast day, a few hours outside 
of Lake Placid. Here KA2CNN is carrying the flame. 



nicator in this vehicle, be- 
sides being preoccupied 
with seeking air free of the 
stench of propane, was re- 
sponsible for notifying the 
torch technician in case of 
a flameout or torch failure. 
It seemed as though ev- 
ery town, no matter how big 
or small, had some sort of 
welcoming ceremony pre- 
pared for us. This usually in- 
volved a high school band 
attempting to play the rath- 
er difficult Olympic an- 
them and always botching 
it We heard that piece in 
every possible key, in every 
possible arrangement — 
even with a disco flourish. 
This was followed by 
speeches — sometimes in- 
terminable—from local 
dignitaries or politicians, 
and then words from our 
ceremonial coordinators 
describing the caravan, the 
function of each of the 
passing vehicles (especially 
helpful for the often-con- 
fusing passage of the ad- 
vance vehicles), and an at- 
tempt to educate the crowd 
about our safety require- 
ments, because the crowds 
were frequently large and 
under-controlled and we 
were coming in in large ve- 
hicles. 

This usually was fol- 
lowed by a short speech 
from the incoming or out- 



going runner, and then the 
torchbearer would arrive, 
make a handoff, the cara- 
van would continue, and, 
perhaps, the incoming run- 
ner would stay to speak a 
little more as the caravan 
moved out to the next stop 
We had been informed of, 
and could plan for, about 
half of these events. The 
rest had either been orga- 
nized by groups or commu- 
nities at the last minute or 
were spontaneous gather 
ings of people. Frequently 
involving many hundreds of 
people, they were com- 
pletely without any authori- 
tative control and overran 
the roadway. The caravan 
drivers, the TD, the staff, 
and most of all, the runners, 
needed to know what they 
were getting into on these 
occasions Somehow, these 
unplanned crowds had to 
be quieted, informed, orga- 
nized, moved back, and 
opened up for the arrival of 
our caravan. 

The runners had a special 
need to know what they 
were getting into because 
of a phenomenon we did 
not anticipate. They suf- 
fered from a certain 
amount of "tunnel vision" 
due to the exertion, the 
weather, the excitement, 
and the adrenaline They 
frequently needed to be led 




Photo /. WB2VUK with Brooke Newell one of the cere- 
monial coordinators, at a ceremony site in upstate NY, us- 
ing one of the Kenwood TR-240OS to mike her as she de- 
scribes the layout of the ceremony to the TD in the cara- 
van a few miles away, Note the collapsible whip antenna 
which was used instead of the rubber ducky for added 
range. 



in by another runner at the 
ceremonial site, or they 
would trip on a curb or 
bump into a member of the 
public in the crowds Their 
torch also was a fire hazard, 
and holding it up high gave 
a runner an effective height 
in excess of 9 feet. The job 
of the ceremonial coordina- 
tor was to pre-brief the car- 
avan from an advanced po- 
sition relative to obstacles, 
pathway, crowd quantity 
and mood, clearance, fire 
hazard, etc. This informa- 
tion was passed along to 
each driver in the caravan 
and also given to the runner 
by PA from the Pace vehi- 
cle. Because of the involve- 
ment of the ceremonial co~ 
ordinators with the local 
groups sponsoring the cere- 
monies, the job of sizing up 
the ceremony situation fre- 
quently fell to the commu- 
nicators themselves. The 
communicator also was 
responsible for the relay of 
ETAs to the local groups so 
they could plan the timing 
on their stages. 

After the caravan and 
torchbearer had passed 
through the location of the 

ceremony, after it was all 



over, the ceremonial vehi- 
cle driver waited to collect 
all of the personnel Then it 
was off down the road to 
catch up to the caravan, 
and — often with a very 
high-speed police escort — 
to leapfrog the caravan and 
make the way ready for it at 
the next ceremony site. On 
our busiest day, there were 
21 such ceremonies to coor- 
dinate Although not the 
most difficult position, it 
was a high-pressure com- 
municating position and 
perhaps the most exciting, 
since the op was able to 
view the ceremonies them- 
selves and some of them 
were quite well put to- 
gether; 

One problem the person- 
nel in the ceremonial vehi- 
cle did not have was that of 
the visual and psychic ef- 
fects of day after day of 
travel at 7 or 8 mpk We all 
functioned under condi- 
tions of great pressure and 
constant demands. Breaks 
were few and far between, 
and we were almost con- 
stantly in a state of swollen 
derrieres and bladders, 
Hallucinations were one re- 
sult of the slow movement 



42 73 Magazine * February, 1981 



of the passing panorama 
(which also made for pro- 
longed nulls on VHF}; some 
of us imagined having seen 
trees grow. Radio traffic 
was constant and exhaust- 
ing, of a nature only contest 
operators may be familiar 
with, or those with military 
backgrounds. Calls for the 
particular vehicle for which 
one was communicating al- 
ways seemed to come dur- 
ing that once-in-an-hour pe- 
riod of dropped guard, The 
circuits were so busy that 
even a few seconds of dead 
air were cherished as the 
most precious of gifts. 

Because of the un- 
planned ceremonies, con- 
stant changes in plan, varia- 
tions from the published 
Technical Manual (TM), 
and inaccuracies in the TM 
itself, on the first day out 
W1RM nicknamed the en- 
tire operation "Rollerbalf." 
Those who've seen the mo- 
tion picture will know what 
we're talking about: It de- 
scribes a game in which the 
rules change every quarter, 
getting tougher and more 
violent. The entire script of 
the operation literally was 
changed from minute to 
minute. So pervasive was 
the use of this nickname 
that WR3AFM, the home re- 
peater of one of our NCSs, 
KB3HF, changed its ID for 
us. When we arrived in their 
area, its CW ID was spelling 
'Welcome Olympic Torch 
de WR3AFM." When we 
were awakened the next 
morning and tuned in the 
repeater again, it was sign- 
ing "de WR3AFM Roller- 
ball" The NCSs referred to 
themselves after that first 
40-hour stretch from York- 
town to Baltimore as "Rol- 
lerball Control." 

In the December prac- 
tice, the HF setup received 
a limited workout with 
K2GDX, the coordinator for 
W0RAN, in the Lake Placid 
area, and it was thought 
that we would be using HF 
links directly from the Com- 
mand vehicle to WORAN in 



Lake Placid during the re- 
lay; As it turned out, this 
equipment was hardly ever 
used because of the huge 
volume of tactical and 
safety-related traffic in the 
Comm van, the long operat- 
ing hours, because of Rol* 
lerball, and because of the 
relatively low priority of 
traffic for HF. Instead, op- 
erators from the local area 
traveling with the caravan 
or in contact with the cara- 
van on the external VHF net 
served as VHF-to-HF relays. 
Dozens of highly compe- 
tent ops were involved in 
this particular effort. With- 
out them, the caravan 
would have been virtually 
cut off from the LPOOC ex- 
cept for the overworked 
and extraordinarily unre- 
liable mobile telephones in- 
stalled in the Command 
and PR vehicles. 

Working the HF link with 
W0RAN required the pa- 
tience of old Job. We 
were bothered constantly 
by all the many and varied 
incarnations of the persis- 
tent QRMer, from hams 
who offered to help and 
ended up hindering (some 
have to learn to listen more 
and transmit less unless 
they're certain they can 
help), to ops seeking com- 
memorative contacts dur- 
ing traffic operations, to 
real "sickies" with swishing 
vfos and persistent strong 
carriers The patience, per* 
sistence, and experience of 
HFops involved did prevail, 
however, and the traffic 
was passed. 

Warren Gibson WA4CCK 
provided just one example 
— perhaps the most dedi- 
cated example — of the ded- 
ication and sacrifice so 
many of the local hams of- 
fered. Experienced as a traf- 
fic handler on many nets, 
he joined us in Yorktown as 
the amateur coordinator 
for Virginia, driving a sta- 
tion wagon full of a rather 
extensive HF and VHF set- 
up. He accompanied the 
main caravan for its most 




Photo /. Two of the tofchbearers on the road, somewhere 
in upstate NY. 



trying days, the first ones, 
from Langley AFB to Balti- 
more, nonstop for over for- 
ty hours of driving and op- 
erating relay, and also the 
third day, from Baltimore 
into a grand ceremony on 
the steps of the Capitol. He 
left us in DC amid cheers of 
gratitude from all members 
of the traveling communi- 
cations team, having served 
as an invaluable shoehorn 
on countless occasions. 

We even got some "mari- 
time mobile" operating into 
this thing. Steve WA2DHF is 
a radio operator for the 
Naval Reserve and was 
chosen to accompany the 
torchbearer on a seagoing 
journey aboard a Navy 
landing craft from Langfey 
AFB to the Yorktown pier— 
about 2Vi hours in the wa- 
ter—using a Tempo S-1 all 
the way. For the startup of 
the Relay overland, he 
joined Pete Chamalian 
W1 RM in the Command ve- 
hicle. Also present for the 



startup were ourselves; 
Bob Fern K2AMU; Jeff 
Young KB3HF; Jim Arnold 
WB3EOU; our coordina- 
tor, Bobbie Chamalian 
WB1ADL; Steve Shearer 
WB3LCC; Guy dinger 
K2AV; Paul Vydareny 
WB2VUK; Bob Josuweit 
WA3PZO; Bob Strickland 
WB3HWZ; and, previously 
mentioned, Warren Gibson 
WA4CCK, in his own vehi- 
cle. 

Joining in Princeton was 
Gary Kantor WA2BAU. In 
Albany, the route was split; 
Communities to the west of 
the officially planned route 
had raised funds on their 
own sufficient to allow the 
personnel and vehicles to 
split after the Albany cere- 
mony, permitting 26 run- 
ners to go northwest 
through the Adirondacks 
while the "Albany East" 
team took the other half of 
runners on the original 
route, A tremendous cere- 
mony involving thousands 



73 Magazine ■ February, 1981 43 



of spectators, with disabled 
veterans holding the torch 
with the torchbearer for the 
last couple of hundred feet, 
greeted us all in Albanv 
Governor Carey, following 
a moving speech of wel- 
come, oversaw the lighting 
of two torches from the 
original incoming torch, 
and two runners left the 
plaza, one bound north- 
east, the other northwest, 
both destined to meet a few 
days later in Lake Placid. 

In Albany, additional 
vehicles and staff personnel 
were added to take up the 
slack and to provide cov- 
erage for the scores of cere- 
monies awaiting us on both 
east and west routes The 
closer the runners got to 
Lake Placid, the more iden- 
tification local communi- 
ties felt with the Olympics 
and the larger and more fre- 
quent the individual cere- 
monies became. Five travel- 
ing operators drawn from 
the Albany/Troy/Schenec* 



tady areas were added to 
the communications team: 
)oe Krone WA2SPL. Dennis 
Connors WB2SPK; Armand 
Canestraro WA2EQW; Dan 
Marcella KA2DVK, and 
Guy Kitchen WA2SPE\ Sta- 
tionary support and east- 
with-west relay was provid- 
ed by Dick Frey WA2AAU. 

On the last day. during 
our approach to Lake Plac- 
id and facing the prospect 
of breaking up the group 
which by this time had built 
up an incredible bond of 
solidarity; the amateurs and 
support staff were afforded 
a rare privilege: We all were 
given the opportunity to 
carry the torch for a few 
minutes. On a clear stretch 
of Route 32 south of Sara- 
nac Lake, we left our vehi- 
cles, one position at a time, 
and in moments none of us 
would ever forget, we bore 
the flame north to the 
Olympics, The feeling each 
of us had, holding this sa- 



cred flame and running it 
north, was indescribable. 
Wonderful. As we ran, the 
runners cheered us on and 
our fellow ops took pic- 
tures by the dozens. 

On the night of Friday, 
February 9 r after roller- 
balling for nine days and 
nearly a thousand miles, we 
reached our goal. The east 
and west route torches had 
to meet in downtown Lake 
Placid at exactly the same 
instant. Timing was crucial 
and the circuits began to fill 
with almost nonstop check- 
point and ETA advisories 
between the two caravans. 
One caravan with torch- 
bearer could not be kept 
waiting at the end for the ar- 
rival of the other. The 
crowd was huge, and the 
media were out in full force 
as we played our last hot 
and heavy round of roller- 
balL This was the biggest 
and last task for the com- 
munications team, and we 
knew we had to get it right; 



this was the event the par- 
ticipants would remember 
more than any other; it was 
our crucial test 

We did it The timing was 
flawless, and not a dry eye 
remained in the entire 
team, runner, ham, or staff 
member We had reached 
our destination. Looking 
back, despite some mis- 
takes, some personality 
conflicts, and numerous 
technical difficulties, we 
had performed our job 
through the most incredible 
experience of teamwork 
any of us had ever had 
When the two torchbearers 
met in Lake Placid that 
night, the elation and feel- 
ing of accomplishment that 
swept through the team 
made the stress, depriva- 
tion, and hardship of nine 
days on the road well worth 
the effort. We're looking 
forward to working togeth- 
er again in 1984 in Los An- 
geles Perhaps well see you 
there! ■ 



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• 52 



44 73 Magazine * February. 1981 



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is 373 



is Reader Service— see page 146 



73 Magazine * February, 1981 45 



lohn M. Frank? WA4WDL 
1006 Westmoreland Ave. 
Apt 225 
Norfolk VA 2J508 



New Life for Old Klystrons 

tips for microwave experimenters 



What? Use a vacuum 
tube in this modern 
era of solid-state electron- 
ics? Reading about Cunn di- 
odes, Impatts, and other 
such exotic devices is fine, 
but with the exception of 
the Microwave Associates 
Gunnplexer, there are no 
complete solid-state oscil- 
lators available to the ama- 
teur 1 This became very ap- 
parent while I was trying to 



put together a receiver for 
direct reception of televi 
sion signals from geosyn- 
chronous satellites at 3.7 to 
4.2 GHz. 

A multi-stage oscillator- 
multiplier chain was ruled 
out because of insufficient 
time. If everything works, 
the final receiver might 
have a solid-state local os* 
cillator, but then again, 
maybe not— why discard a 




working circuit? Reflex kly- 
stron oscillators of the 723 
and 2K25 class (see Fig 1) 
have been available on the 
surplus market for over thir- 
ty years. Output frequen- 
cies from below 3 GHz up 
through 9,6 GHz are cur- 
rently available with output 
powers in the neighborhood 
of 10 to 150 milliwatts 2 
These klystrons have found 
applications in the past in 
polar-plexers and as pump 
oscillators for amateur and 



commercial parametric am- 
plifiers- 3 - 4 - 5 ' 6 The tubes 
listed in Table 1 ate similar 
in construction and can be 
mounted in octal sockets 
that have had pin 4 re- 
moved and bored out with 
a number 24 drill, The out- 
put is via the small diame- 
ter, rigid coax line which 
terminates in a short probe. 
The probe was used to 
directly excite a waveguide 
or was capacitively cou- 
pled to a coax cable, 





Output 




Tube 


frequency(GHz) 


Output power{mW) 


726C 


2.7-2.96 


100 


726B 


2,88-3.18 


150 


726A 


3.18-3.41 


100 


2K22 


4.3-4.9 


115 


6115 


5.1 -5.9 


100 


2K26 


6.25-7,06 


100 


2K25* 


8.5-9.66 


30 


723A/B 


8.5*966 


25 



Photo A. 726A klystron with coax output and terminal strip. 



'Improved version of 723/VB, both of which can reach 10 GHz by 
stretching the cavity. 1 

Table 7. Reflex klystrons from 2.7 to 9.66 GHz. 



46 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



In normal operation, the 
tube shell is operated at 250 
to 300 volts above ground. 
This puts the output cable, 
which is connected directly 
to the shell, at a hazardous 
potential However, by op- 
erating the cathode at a 
negative voltage, the shell 
and output cable can be 
maintained safely at 
ground potential 

The photograph shows a 
726A klystron mounted on 
an aluminum plate for use 
as a local oscillator for the 
satellite receiver The tube 
is clamped by a simple split 
block to allow conduction 
cooling and provide a me- 
chanically stable support. 
This degree of mechanical 
rigidity is not required but 
was convenient in this case. 
Also, free-standing opera- 
tion with convective cool- 
ing is alright. The oscillator 
covers a measured frequen- 
cy range of from below 3.2 
GHz to above 33 GHz. 

The output frequency of 
this particular tube as a 
function of the rotation of 
the tuning screw is shown in 
Fig. 2 + By changing the re- 
flector voltage, the output 
frequency could be shifted 
electrically plus or minus 
fifteen megahertz from the 
mechanically set frequen- 
cy. This FM characteristic 
can be used for fine tuning 
or for a form of afc with 
simple circuitry. 7 

The output probe is ter- 
minated with an SMA con- 
nector. A cross section of 
the connector assembly is 
shown in Fig, 3. A BNC con- 
nector could be used with 
equal success. The output 
probe center conductor is 
clipped close to the insulat- 
ed sleeve, the ferrule is slid 
back onto the probe Then 
the center conductor is 
soldered to the coax con- 
nector. Following this, the 
ferrule is slid forward, 
screwed to the connector 
with two 2-56 screws, and 
then sweat-soldered to the 



I — RfFLECfOR 
TERMINAL 




TOMrttG 

SORE Mr ^ J | j- 



TUNING 
STRUT 



-^ 



- 



V 



" ',' *l 



FLEXIBLE 
DIAPHRAGM 



■METal 
SHELL. 
•RfSOKATORi 



COAXIAL UME 
OUTPUT (PlU 4) 



Fig. 1, 723<lass reflex kly- 
stron. 

probe. 

Power leads run from a 
barrier strip to the tube. 
Connections to the tube are 
made with a modified octal 
tube socket — see Fig. 4. 
While normal operation re- 
quires — 300 to ^700 volts 
at zero current for the re- 
flector, operation at re- 
duced potentials and out- 
put powers is not only pos- 
sible but desirable in that 
power dissipation and heat 
are reduced substantially. 
This adds to the tube life-ex- 
pectancy. 

Operation has been at 
cathode voltages as low as 
— 1 50 volts at 10 m A and re- 
flector voltages of —150 
to - 300 volts. With a - 300- 
vol t cathode supply, output 
powers in excess of 60 milli- 
watts were readily ob- 
tained. With a -150-volt 
cathode supply, the output 
dropped to about 4 mW, 
which is still sufficient for 
use as a local oscillator- 
Even at the high powers 
with only free convection 
cooling, life expectancy is 
high, Tubes pulled out of 
service after hundreds of 
hours of service and stored 
thirty years or more are still 
operating, 

A word of caution: The 
reflector must never be- 
come positive with respect 
to the cathode. If it does, it 
will draw current heat up, 
and outgas, ruining the 
tube. To prevent this from 
occurring, merely connect 
a rectifier diode between 
the cathode and reflector 
as shown in Fig. 4, 




TUJM5 FROM FULL*' CLOSED 



2-36 SCREWS—i 



Fig. 2. Output frequency of 726 A as a function of tuning- 
screw rotation. 



The theory and operation 
of reflex klystrons is 
available elsewhere and 
therefore is not covered 
here. 8 - 9 What I hope I have 
accomplished here is to re- 
mind other amateurs of the 
availability of reflex kly- 
strons as packaged sources 
of microwave power that 
are rugged, cover a wide 
spectrum, and are eco- 
nomical. ■ 



SWEAT 
SOLDERED 




0RAS5 

FERRULE 



SMA CONNECTOR 



■—DRILL WITH 
# 24 DRILL 



References 

1. "Communicate on 10.25 
GHz/' John W. Molnar WA3ETD, 
73 Magazine, October, 1977. 

2. "Tabulation of Data on Micro- 
wave Tubes,' 1 J. K. Moffitt, Na~ 
tionai Bureau of Standards 
Handbook 104, Superintendent 
of Documents, US Government 
Printing Office, Washington DC 
20402, $1 ,25. 

3. Parametric Amplifiers, Jim 
Fisk W1DTY, 73, Inc., 1967, 
Peterborough NH 03453. 

4- VHF for the Radio Amateur, 
Frank (X Jones t Cowan Publish* 
ing Corp., 300 West 43rd St., 
New York NY, 1961. 

5. See references In ARRL VHF 
manual. 

6. "A Complete X-Band Trans- 
mitter/' S. M- Olberg W1SNN, 73 
Magazine, August, 1978. 

7. "Pogo Stick for Reflex Kly- 
strons/ Francis E. Adams 
W6BPK, Ham Radio, July, 1973. 

8. Klystrons and Microwave 
Triodes, Hamilton, Knipp, and 
Kuper, Radiation Laboratory 
Series, Vol. 7 t McGraw-Hill, 
1948. 

9. Technique of Microwave 
Measurement, Radiation Labor- 
atory Series, Volume 11, 
McGraw-Hill. 1948. 




Fig. 3, Coax connector detail 
and assembly. 




CUT OFF UNUSED 
PORTION Of SOCKET 



STANDARD 

OCTAL 
SOCKET 



METAL 
SHELLn 




Fig. 4, Socket modifications 
and wiring diagram. 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 47 



Marvtn C Bom W84LMt 
9330 Sunshine Avenue 
Corpus C/irrstJ TK 7S4Q3 



Add RTTY to Your Repeater 

voice operation is preserved 



The consensus was that 
we needed a RTTY re- 
peater in Corpus Christi. It 
also was decided, on that 
Saturday morning, that I 
would build it lhadnovote 
and no objections were al- 
lowed. I would build it 

The first idea was to 
transmit AFSK tones 
through the local 147.06/.66 
repeater. It used subaudi- 
ble tone control, and few 
people used it This method 
was tried, and it worked 
with some success, but dif- 



ferent tone frequencies and 
levels caused problems in 
copying, What was needed 
were standard tones from 
the repeater 

Looking through the 
Flesher catalog, the answer 
stood out like a BY prefix on 
twenty. I could demodulate 
the incoming RTTY audio 
using the Flesher DM-170 
and use the loop-keyer out- 
put transistor to key the 
F5-1 Audio Frequency Shift 
Keyer to feed audio to the 
mike input of the repeater 




Photo A. Modified DM-170 showing use of 6 trirnpots in 
place of 12 fixed resistors. 



transmitter. As an added 
bonus, I could use the 
autostart circuitry (on the 
DM-170) to operate the 
transmitter PTT control, 
clean and simple. Flesher 
even has a nice little power 
supply to operate both 
boards -Model TTP-12. All 
these goodies cost less than 
$100.00. The boards arrived 
in 4 days! 

The FS-1 and power sup- 
ply were constructed by 
KSOC r and I assembled the 
DM-170. Total construction 
time was about four hours 
and the boards worked the 
first time. The only problem 
was that hand-picking resis- 
tors to tune the DM-1 70 was 
slow and somewhat inac- 
curate. The DM-170 copied 
20-meter RTTY perfectly, 
but I was bothered by the 
resistors, I assumed Flesher 
had used the resistors as a 
cost-cutting technique. 
However, my RTTY con- 
verter had to be perfect 1 
cut the 12 fixed resistors 
from the board (R14, 15, 18, 
19,22,23,26,27,30,31,34, 
35) and superglued six 
Weston 850W 2k trirnpots 
in place of them (see Photo 
A and Fig. 2). 

Flesher s design used two 



resistors in parallel con- 
nected to the " — " termi- 
nals, pin 6 or 2 of the op 
amps serving as filters. The 
tune-up is similar to their 
method. When the pots are 
glued to the board, only 
one lead is connected to 
the ground for each pot and 
the wiper arm of the pot is 
soldered to the correct 
terminal as you tune that 
stage. [Read their instruc- 
tions and use their method 
of tuning, and tuning the 
pots will be very straight- 
forward.) I tuned the board 
with the pots in 15 minutes. 
It takes an hour with the 
hand-selected resistors. 

I used an H-P audio oscil- 
lator driving a frequency 
counter as my frequency 
standard. It is important to 
keep the audio level to the 
DM-170 as low as possible 
to get accurate tuning. I 
faced the problem of hav- 
ing too much audio to the 
DM-170 when I had correct 
audio to the counter. I 
solved this by using a BNC 
T-connector on the oscil- 
lator, feeding directly to the 
counter and using a 10-to-1 
scope probe as an attenu- 
ator to feed the DM-170 I 
now could lower the audio 



48 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



oscillator to the correct 
level without losing the 
counter 

The DM-170 has an "im- 
proved mark hold" option 
which is the installation of 
an additional diode I sug- 
gest this be installed to 
force the board to mark any 
time the audio is lost This 
feature is very nice when 
the DM-170 is keying the 
FS-1. As soon as the repeat- 
er comes on the air, it trans- 
mits a steady mark This 
mark is our local reference 
and is a convenient 2125 
mark for tuning filters. 

While building the board. 
install a wire from Q5 base 
to pin 2 of the edge con- 
nector to key RY1 . 

The Motorola repeater I 
was using has a 5-volt dc to 
ground to key the PTT. The 
autostart transistor (Q5) 
collector was used to take 
this voltage to ground. 
Without making any timing 
changes or adding the 
threshold control as sug- 
gested by Flesher, the re- 
peater would key up after 
receiving six seconds of 
steady mark, The repeater 
would drop out 15 seconds 
after the input audio to 
the DM-170 was removed. 
These times proved popular 
with the local RTTY users so 
they were left unchanged. 
The threshold control was 
never added. The six-sec- 
ond delay prevents ker- 
chunking the repeater, and 
the sharpness of the filter 
and time required prevents 
someone from whistling the 
machine up, The15-second 
off delay gives a reasonable 
time to look at filter tuning 
or to zero your AFSK unit to 
the repeater mark I found 
it possible to rough-tune a 



TMtV fliOfi 
SEE T£*T 

«EFl_*C£5 U i4 
6 R!4 




m 



Fig. 2. Pot connection to 
DM-170. 



filter and AFSK unit enough 
to get on the air by zero 
beating the mark and space 
audio from another QSO. 

The nice thing about us- 
ing a demod and AFSK at 
the repeater is that every- 
one hears the same mark 
and space. Gone are the 
problems of who has the 
correct frequency. The only 
operating problem using 
this arrangement is the 
need to use a 170-cycle 
shift for the CW ID require- 
ment. The mark/hold circuit 
will not repeat the narrower 
shifts used for some CW 
IDs. When the170Hz shift 
is used, the repeater will 
transmit the ID in CW as it 
is received. I don't consider 
the small bit of garbage 
from the CW on my screen 
a problem- 
After operating the ma- 
chine a few weeks, several 
operators wanted the audio 
for voice communication 
back on the machine so 
they could talk about RTTY 
problems without changing 
frequencies. A small 12-volt 
relay was installed to 
switch the input audio be- 
tween the receiver audio 
and the FS-1 unit A 2N2222 
transistor controlled by the 
base voltage of Q5 through 
a 330-Ohm resistor was 
used to ground the coil of 
the relay. The relay closes 
in the RTTY mode. 

When the repeater was in 
the standby mode, the sub- 
audible tone would key it in 
the voice mode. Or, when 6 
seconds of mark were re- 
ceived, the relay would 
close and the repeater 
would come up in the RTTY 
mode and transmit a steady 
mark until it received a 
RTTY signal, or it would 
stay up for 15 seconds and 
drop. 

The repeater IDer is con- 
nected to ID when the 
transmitter is activated, re- 
gardless of mode, In the 
voice mode, operation is 
normal as required by FCC 
rules and can be heard in 
the background of voice 
communication. In the 
RTTY mode, the operation 



Dfitro 



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AUDIO 

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TRANSMITTER 
(c^ AUDIO INPUT 



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C105 
001 DISK 
50V0C 



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SMALL 12V 
RELAY SPOT 



Q| 

OR £ QUiV 



PTT RELAY 

COIL IM REPEATER 




Fig. 1. Interface connections for RTTY repeater modifica- 
tions, 



of the IDer is the same as 
voice, except the RTTY 
filters at the receiving RTTY 
station do not acknowledge 
the 700-Hz repeater ID fre- 
quency. So far, no one has 
complained of garbled 
copy due to the repeater ID 
unit The repeater can prop- 
erly ID itself and it will re- 
peat the CW FSK IDs from 
the user RTTY station Us- 
ing this relay arrangement 
gives RTTY priority over 
voice and keeps voice com* 
munication in the input fre- 
quency from garbling RTTY 
copy. 

All three boards were 
mounted in a 3~inch chassis 
which was mounted inside 
the repeater cabinet. With a 
cover in place and proper 
line filtering and audio fil- 
tering, there were no rf 
problems. It is important to 
use proper filtering as rf will 
keep the autostart in the on 
mode and keep the trans- 
mitter up. Connection of 
the FS-1 board is straightfor- 
ward. Connect the proper 
output to match your re* 
peater input level, adjust- 
ing R107 as needed to 
match the level of the RTTY 
tones to the level of the re- 
ceiver voice audio, using a 
deviation meter monitoring 
the transmitter output 

Using the direct key- 
board connection drawing 



shown in the FS-1 instruc- 
tions, connect the junction 
of pin 6 and the 4.7k resistor 
to the collector of Q6 on 
the DM-170 (pin 4, loop 
keyer), The FS-1 will now 
track the DM-170 mark for 
mark and space for space, 
including CW IDs. 

The TTP-12 power supply 
provides ±12 volts at 0.2 
Amps and maintains regula- 
tion through a wide range 
of input voltages. The spec- 
ifications for the DM-170 
call for ±15 volts r but the 
board will operate fine with 
the 12 volts supplied from 
the TTP-12 — just use the 
supply when you tune the 
filters. Install a power switch 
in the ac line, because the 
DM-170 will key the trans- 
mitter for 15 seconds at 
power on. When you bring 
your repeater up from a 
cold start, wait the required 
warm-up time if you are us- 
ing a tube final and then 
turn on the RTTY boards 

It's not bad for a hundred 
bucks and a few hours of 
work. I 



*C 



f 



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jSZt I 

01 



CIQl 
COOVDC 

COOVDC 



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TTP-JJ 



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Fig. 3. Ac filter. 



J 



1 

13V 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 49 



H^BH 



Cart C Drumefter W5)l 
5824 NW 58 Street 
Warr Acres OK 73U2 



A Patch for the TS-120S 

add phone patch compatibility 



When I bought a Ken- 
wood TS-12GS and 
sold my Drake TR-4C, it 
cost my station phone- 
patch capability. There's 
just no graceful way of mat- 
ing the existing patch with 
the Kenwood's input and 
output accesses. That 
brought on the challenge of 
second-guessing the Japa- 
nese engineers. Sometimes 
that's easy; often it's not. 
There seems to be an un- 
written law (or is it written?) 
that all equipment must be 
designed to make customer 
modifications difficult. 

A bit of study of the sche- 
matic wiring diagram for 
the TS-120S revealed an un- 
used terminal (#7) on the re- 



mote connector, More 
study revealed that audio 
signal and send-receive 
functions were available at 
the remote connector. Ah, 
now if one had microphone 
input also available. . . 
Could it be just a matter of 
piping a wee bit of audio to 
the mic input jack from that 
unused (#7) terminal? It 
looked feasible on paper, 
but it pays never to leap too 
precipitately to conclu- 
sions. So the next step in- 
volved a bit of exploration 
of the innards. 

If you've never un- 
covered your TS-1205. a 
word or two of advice 
might be of worth. Take the 
top cover off first, taking 



GftOUHD OWL* mEHE 




shielded 
single-wire 

CABLE 




GROUND 



BACK View 0^ HEMOTE CONNEC- 
TOR CHASSIS CONNECTOR, WITH 
TS-t?OS TufrfiCD uPSl&E DOWN 



BACK VIEW OF UICROPHQN6 
CHASES CONNECTOR, WrTH 
TS-1J05 TURNEO UPSIDE DOWN 



Fig. 1. 



care not to disturb the four 
screws that hold the inter- 
nal speaker in place. It's not 
necessary to remove the 
top totally; just loosen it 
and slightly move it from 
place. Now you can flip the 
set over on its top side 
without endangering the 
three top controls and with* 
out having to worry about 
the lead to the speaker; 

With the top loose, the 
bottom comes off readily, 
Once it's off, take a look at 
the back side of the mic 
connector. One of the four 
terminals has a single white 
wire going to it. That's the 
one you're interested in! 
And it's the one most easily 
reached! No doubt the Jap- 
anese engineer responsible 
for this grievous faux pas 
has been compelled to 
commit hara-kiri. 

But how about the other 
end? Not to worry! There's 
a plate mounting a number 
of jacks, the remote con- 
nector among them. This 
plate comes out with the 
removal of five screws. 
Once out, terminal #7 is 
most easily reached. Ah, 
breathe a prayer for the 
soul of the poor engineer! 

Now, all that remains is 



to find a single-wire shield- 
ed conductor small enough 
to snake along the edge of 
the chassis. There are holes 
through the compartment 
shielding to accommodate 
a small and flexible cable. I 
suggest you ground the 
shield of this wire only at 
one end (I used the terminal 
#7 end) to avoid ground 
loops. 

The remote connector 
now provides the following 
services: ground and #1 — 
audio output, 8 Ohms; 
ground and #3 — send- 
receive control, ground and 
#7 — audio input, high im- 
pedance. 

You might take a hint 
from the wiring diagram 
and put a 100-Ohm resistor 
in series with that audio 
output This will both re- 
duce the signal level (most 
likely too high for phone 
lines) and also protect the 
output transistors from any 
non-kosher load a phone 
patch may offer. 

The introduction of the 
capacitance of the short 
cable across the mic circuit 
has made no detectable dif- 
ference in the quality of the 
voice signal from my TS- 



50 73 Magazine * February, 1981 




WAWASEE ELECTRONICS 



v* Reader Service— see page 146 



73 Magazine ■ February, 1981 51 



JB 1004 FC 

Shows exact transmitter 
frequency every lime you hit the 
mike button. Great for mobile 
professionals and hobbyists. 
Goes anywhere on 12 VDC, on 
the road or at home. AC/ DC 
converter included for base 
operation. .5" red LED digits with 
lead digits blanking; range 1 to 50 
MHt (typical); accuracy to 100 
cycles; sensitivity 50 mV. 
Compact (1V*a 4Va M x 4") 
textured black plastic case 
sits anywhere with velcro- 
type "spots". 



JB 6000 SW 

Wattmeter is peak-reading and 
RMS switch selectable. Covering 
all frequencies 10 thru BO meters 
with low insertion loss. Can be 
left in the antenna line for full 
time monitoring of transmitter 
power. 

Five ranges switch selectable — 
0-20, 0-200, 0-2000 watts. Multip- 
lier range 2 x 2000 and 3 x 2000. 
The SWR bridge shows voltage 
standing wave ratios of 1 .5. 2. and 
3 for power inputs up to 200 
watts. A must instrument for the 
professional or hobbyist operator. 




JB1002 FC/M 

COUNTER/WATT- 
METER/SWR BRIDGE 

3-in-1 instrument for 
professionals and hobbyists. 
FREQUENCY COUNTER has six 
digit. 1 to 50 MHz range (typical), 
accuracy to 100 cycles, .5 " LED 
readouts with seven-digit 
capability Peak-reading WATT- 
METER has three switch-selected 
ranges — 0-20, 0-200, 0-2000 
watts and covers all operating 
frequencies in the 10-80 meter 
bands. The SWR BRIDGE shows 
standing wave ratios of 1.5, 2, and 
3. Designed to be left in 
transmission line of any base 
station; operates on 117 VAC, 4 
11/16H x9 3 V'Wx7"L Every 
accessory an operator needs in 
one handsome cabinet. 




$355.50 




The most deluxe Black Cat" - 
accessory. MONITOR SCOPE 
permits measuring RF output 
to antenna and viewing 
modulation patterns. In 
addition to standard wave 
envelope patterns, a ne 1 
trapezoid pattern feature 
allows better visual inspection 
of the transmitted signal. It 
hows linearity of the RF 
amplifier, insufficient antenn 
loading, distortion of the 
modulating signal, {__ 
regeneration, parasitics o 
modulation peaks, power 
supply hum, over and under 







^ 




52 73 Magazine • February, 1981 




JB 4001 



JB1001 SFC/M 

SCOPE/COUNTER/ 
WATTMETER/SWR BRIDGE 



Monitor scope measures RF 

output to the antenna and shows 

modulation patterns. (See 

description of trapezoid pattern 

feature under JB 1001 ) 

Monitor with low impedance 

earphones your modulation 

characteristics for proper mike 

gain and talk power Built in 

audio generator to help adjust 

transmitter for peak performance 

Covers all frequencies 10-160 

meters, no loss in line; therefore 

can be installed as a constant 

monitor of your transmitter. 

Size is 10VW x SV/'H x 11 VL. 

Perfect for professional and 
hobbyist operators. 






r 

V 



modulation. Non-linear 
signals can be traced from 
transceiver to antenna. 
FREQUENCY COUNTER has 
six big LED digits, with seven- 
digit capability. 1 to 50 MHz 
range (typical), 100 cycle 
readability, 50mV sensitivity. 
Peak-reading WATTMETER 
has three scales — 0-20, 
0-200, 0-2000 watts and covers 
all operating frequencies in 
the 10-80 meter bands. SWR 
BRIDGE reads standing wave 
ratios of 1.5, 2, and 3. 5V 2 H x 
12Va"W x 12 *'L. Perfect for 
professional and hobbyist 
radio base stations, 




JB 2000 SW 

WATTMETER 
SWR BRIDGE 

WATTMETER is true pe<*n 

reading type and has thiee 

ranges — 0-20. 0-200. 0-2000 

watts and covers all operating 

frequencies in the 10-80 metei 

bands. The SWR BRIDGE shows 

voltage standing wave ratios of 

1.5. 2. and 3, A must instrument 

for a professional or hobbyisi 

operator 




JB 1000 S/M 

SCOPE/WATTMETER 

SWR BRIDGE 

The daddy of them all the JB 

1000 S/M MONITOR SCOPE 

measures RF output to Iht 

antenna and shows modulation 

patterns, (See description of new 

trapezoid pattern feature under 

JB 1001.) Peak-reading 

WATTMETER has three ranges — 

Q-20 T 0-200. 0-2000 watts and 

covers all operating frequencies 

in the 10*80 meter bands The 

SWR BRIDGE shows standing 

wave ratios of 1.5. 2, and 3 

5VH x 12V W x 12 L For 

professionals and hobbyist* 



*** Reader Service— see page 146 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 53 



JB 1007 SW 



Nom 



For the professional or hobbyist radio 
operator who is lucky enough Lo have 
more than one base station 
antenna, here s a handy way to 
select them of combine 
them . . the Black Cat' 
4-Position Coax Switch 
from Wawasee Electronics 
of Syracuse. Indiana, 

The heavy duly coa* 

switch is rated at 2000 

watts PEP and is housed 

in a compact cabinet 

measuring just 3 7/1S"H x 

4 3 32 W k 4 L. The front 

panel carries nomenclature 

lor the four switch positions: 

VERT,, HORZ.* AUX.. and the 

combined position, VERT-HORZ, The 

switch is controlled by a large, easy-to-grip 

knob. The rear panel contains the coax 

connectors for Vertical. Horizontal, and 

Auxiliary antennas, plus the input 

connector. 



AHTEMU 

s&ector 







went 

HQR2 



$23.50 



CO-PHASE HARNESS 

Designed to match 50 ohm transmitter to a 

pair of 50 ohm antennas. Can also be used as a 

stacking harness for two beam antennas with SO 

ohm impedances. 



JB 4000 SW 

The unit measures RF 
watts to 4 KW in frequency 
range of 10-80 meters. 
Both RMS and peak mea- 
sures SWR and modula- 
tion percentage, alt with- 
out changing cables. Net 
weight is approximately 3 
lbs. Earphone jack tor sig- 
nal monitor. 4 position 
antenna coax switch 
included. 






*HECt«l 

?D0B 

^ I r*** 



= fJT; 



«■ "*-■ » :. 



** * •* * I 



™ J. 



ii * 






WtWUM 






E^cironJcs 



$169.50 



JB1000 

KILOWATT 
DUMMY LOAD 

Portable and capable of 
handling up to a kilowatt 
of power. The oil cooled 
temperature stable resistor 
provides a low VSWR up 
to 400 megahertz. 50 ohms 
impedance. Less oil. 



**- 



$269.50 JB 4 K 

AIR COOLED DUMMY LOAD 

Load is 50 ohms resistive - 200 watts RMS 

(without blower operation). Frequency range Is 

1.6 KHz to 240 MHz, for a SWR of 1.2. With 

blower operating continuous rating Is 4000 

watts PEP, 2000 watts RMS. 



•=- j? 



$29,95 



UWAASEE ELBCTROMCS 

"home of BLACK CA T® products" made in usa 

P.O. BOX 36. SYRACUSE, INDIANA 46567 



54 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



Wfe Guarantee 
Quality and 

ftrfomiance 

With Eveiy Crystal 

In the manufacture of quartz crystals, certain limits 

must be adhered to when finishing the unit. Such 

limits are often held to better than .001 % for 

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Tolerances of this magnitude mean nothing unless the 
oscillator is the exact reproduction of the oscillator 

in which the crystal was calibrated. This also applies 

to wider tolerances. 

We store crystal processing specifications for more 
than 7,000 types of old and new communication 

equipment in our computer files. This enables us to 
provide the customer with custom crystals at a 

minimum of down-time. 

*We guarantee our crystals against defective 

materials and workmanship for an unlimited time 

when used in the equipment for which they 

were specifically made. 

Orders may be placed by Phone: 405/236-3741 • 

TELEX: 747-147 * CABLE: Incrystal • TWX: 

910-831-3177 * Mail: International Crystal Mfg. Co,, 

lnc„ 10 North Lee, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102, 



□BDuU 



I KTgfl NATIONAL CflVSTAl UFO- CO. INC. 
10 ftta** tri Ot tfi o w G*r O-ia 73)0? 




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TEMPO S-1, only $239 
with touchtone .... $269 

ICOM IC-255A (old 
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only $299 

KENWOOD TR-7600A 
closeout $269.95 

YAESU FT-207R for the 
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APPLE Disk 
System: Apple 
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troller, RF Modulator; 
NEW DOS 3.3 $1799 

APPLE 16k Special $995! 

Apple prices include prepaid shipping 

within continental United States 

Erickson is accepting (ate model 

amateur radio equipment for service; 

full time technician on duty 

CALL TOLL FREE 

(outside Illinois only) 

(800) 621-5802 



Based 
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9:30-9:00 Thursday 
I 9:00-3:00 Saturday 



Wed & FrL 



YfU 




ERICKSON 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Chicago. IL 60630 

5456 North Milwaukee Ave. 

(31 2| 63) -51 81 Iwithin Illinois] 



v* Reader Service — see page 146 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 55 



Alan D. Kline WBIfOD 
95 Banks ffd 
Swampscotr MA 01907 



Successful Ham Classes 

a guide for club organizers 






In 3 years, I organized 
11 ham code and theory 
classes, with the following 

results; 

• 70 Novices 

• 40 Generals 

• 5 Advanced 

• 2 Extras 

— with two more classes 



starting the first of the year 
in two different locations 
If I can do it, so can you; 
here's how I did it, with 
help from my ctub mem- 
bers. 

It all started when I 
joined the local repeater 
club and became friends 
with the club's secretary. 



Every morning for months 
we would meet at the local 
post office and he would fill 
me in on the club's history 
and current events. The 
ARRL had been pushing all 
clubs to sponsor classes to 
beef up the number of U.S. 
hams before the WARC 
conference. As the club had 




You get your "Ham" License! 



<s> 



UlMfUR RAPID CI *BI! «0» MMUMftG 






It 0,00 FEB F&S50V 
FVLL COOBSt. 



W 61 fqO 






This is the standard poster I use. It is from the League, hut I like to add information to ft 



not fulfilled this request, he 
felt they should start some 

kind of educational pro- 
gram I volunteered for the 
job. 

Before I was going to or- 
ganize any program, I had 
to know if there was a need. 
As there were classes in a 
town only 10 miles away, I 
wanted to be sure we would 
be successful in our at- 
tempts It was discussed at 
length at my work QTH and 
decided that a marketing 
survey could be conducted 
to establish the communi- 
ty's ham radio educational 
needs A test market of a 
20-mile radius within our 
repeater's coverage would 
be a good parameter I set 
out to do a direct-mail 
market survey. 

As the survey needed to 
go to unlicensed but poten- 
tial hams, t remembered 
having once been an asso- 
ciate member of the ARRL 
Associate members are the 
unlicensed league mem- 
bers who get QST every 
month. For various reasons, 
this group joins the League, 
and the results from this 
mailing would show that 
this group had need for a 
class to help many of them 
get their tickets 

In requesting a list of the 



56 73 Magazine * February, 1901 



-eague's associate mem- 
sers, the League told me 
any ARRL affiliated club 
could request a computer 
printout of the League's 
mailing list by zip code. The 
list is convenient !y printed 
on pressure-sensitive labels. 
Upon receiving the list, I 
immediately had it duplh 
cated. Certain brands of 
commercial copying ma- 
chines have this capability. 
I was glad I made three cop- 
ies, because later I would 
find out that the League 
will only supply the list 
once a year. A quick scan of 
the labels produced the 
mailing list of associates I 
was to use. The rest of the 
list was used to solicit 
membership and to an- 
nounce the General and Ad- 
vanced classes. 

Response 

I printed an announce- 
ment of the possibility of 
having Novice and General 
classes and mailed one out 
to each of the fifty poten- 
tial hams on the League's 
associate member list. 

Then* was instant response. 
All of the 25 calls I got were 
logged in a notebook with 
addresses and the callers' 
stories. By their stories, I 
mean that they all had var- 
ious reasons for joining the 
League and for not being li- 
censed. 

The first caller claimed 
to be able to copy code at 
20 wpm. He was in his early 
sixties and nearing retire- 
ment age, having learned 
his CW in the army in 
WWII, and he had never 
forgotten it. A Drake TR4 
was used to copy code for 
many years, but he never 
had the help he seemed to 
need to get a ticket. The 
second caller was a Viet- 
nam veteran who also had 
learned the code in the ser- 
vice. Both of these calls 
were typical of the many I 
would receive 

Three of the responses 
came from adults with vari- 
ous handicaps They had 
long-time interests in com- 



munications, but needed 
help to get on the air To 
help them with their indi- 
vidual problems, I joined 
the Handi-Ham System at 
the Courage Center in 
Minnesota. Their program 
is a United Fund-sponsored 
agency that helps the hand- 
icapped not only get their 
tickets, but loans them 
equipment. Involvement in 
the Handi-Ham System has 
led me and my instructors 
into some very rewarding 
personal experiences. 

A Committee Is Formed 

Based on the calls I got r I 
knew there was need for a 
class of some kind. I an* 
nounced that I was going to 
organize a class and asked 
the repeater club member- 
ship for help. We formed 
the club's first educational 
committee. 

Those involved included 
a high-school guidance 
counselor with much teach- 
ing experience, a profes- 
sional musician and teach- 
er, a state safety inspector, 
and an electronics tech- 
nician. (I am a ladder and 
scaffolding salesman) 
After talking with them, I 
decided they all had the 
ability to explain ham radio 
and communications in lay- 
man's terms. In selecting 
teachers, you must let only 
the active hams do most of 
the teaching. It didn't take 
long to realize that my lack 
of CW experience and pri- 
mary interest in VHF/UHF 
was of little help to aspiring 
Novices, I decided to stick 
to the organizational end of 
the program. 

At this point r 1 contacted 
the Club and Training De- 
partment at the League 
and, for $1.50, they sent me 
their instructor's package. 
It included many items of 
interest. The first is a 
10-12-week lesson plan for 
teaching a Novice class. It 
is written to go along with 
the ARRL's Tune in the 
World textbook and code 
tape In later classes, we on- 
ly used this as a guide for 




Don Robson, 12 Boulder Way, Swampscott MA 09107. Don 
is blind and confined to a wheelchair. One of our first 
students, he worked hard for 18 months before getting his 
ticket The repeater club gave him a standing ovation the 
night he came to announce his call 



the teachers and let the stu- 
dents choose their own 
books. 

The second booklet was 

a workbook with problems 
and duplications of the 
League's 35mm Novice 
slide program We invested 
in two sets of these slides so 
our instructors could rein- 
force hard-to-explain con- 
cepts The third and most 
useful booklet is entitled 
How to Start a Course in 
Amateur Radio. After care* 
fully reading all this materi- 
al I knew we were heading 
in the right direction. 

For our first class, we de- 
cided to use the Tune in the 
World series plus the 73 
Magazine code tapes 

Rooms 

In scouting out potential 
classroom sites, I had to re- 
member the need for 
wheelchair access ramps. 
The room also would need 



to have a movie screen, 
blackboards, and ac out- 
lets, and, most importantly, 
be in a good location for 
the students to drive to In 
most communities there is 
usually a building that 
meets these requirements. 
Our first site was the local 
high school in my home- 
town. The school was open 
four nights a week for the 
town's adult education pro- 
gram and still had many 
large vacant rooms. 

Since the students do not 
all pass the code at the 
same time, it is necessary to 
separate some students 
from the others. As the 
code exam is given, the stu- 
dents who pass it earlier 
than the rest will get their 
written exams back from 
Gettysburg before the slow- 
er students. If you have a 
second room, you can split 
the class into two groups 
each night, One group will 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 57 



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This is a follow-up mailer for a class we didn't have any 
money for At least half the class responded by sending 
money. 



always be in the second 

room taking one of the two 
exams Because the FCC 
doesn't let instructors have 
bulk exams anymore, the 
Novice instructor is always 
burdened with the extra 
work of sending exams 
back to the FCC at stag- 
gered times. 

I contacted the director 
of continuing education at 
the school I selected and ar- 
ranged for three rooms. 
One was a large sewing 
room with big desks that 
served as Novice classroom 
number one. It was big 
enough to seat 25 students, 
three wheelchairs, and also 



large enough for our dem- 
onstrations. The second 
classroom was across the 
hall and was used as the ex- 
tra exam room 

The third room was the 
high school's electronics 
lab. We chose to teach a 
small General class in there. 
Besides having VTVMs and 
scopes, there was a general 
coverage receiver. Lots of 
other electronic equipment 
there made it easier to 
teach prospective Gener- 
als. Most regional vocation- 
al technical high schools 
and junior colleges have 
similar labs and might be 
willing to let you use them. 



Media 


Calls 


Percent of Total Calls 


Newspaper ads 


90 


45 


Heathkit posters 


50 


30 


ARRL lists 


20 


10 


Ham stores 


20 


10 


Word of mouth 


10 


5 


Totals 


200 


100 



Table 7. 



Taxpayers like to see and 
hear about the school being 
used as much as possible. 

At this point, I made my 
first mistake: I offered to 
pay for the rooms We had 
to charge $25 per student to 
cover our initial costs, For 
that, they received the Tune 
in the World package and a 
guarantee of a Novice li- 
cense! When the time came 
to make the next year's ar- 
rangements for rooms, I 
had learned that most 
school departments are 
more than willing to let any 
civic group use their facil- 
ities. 

For our second year's 
program, the town of Dan- 
vers, Massachusetts, civil 
defense radio unit was the 
repeaters cosponsor The 
superintendent of schools 
and the school committee 
were glad to give us the 
needed four rooms at no 
charge. We met as part of 
the adult education pro- 
gram on Thursday nights 
Both the school and the CD 
unit helped the club adver- 
tise the classes. 

During the second half of 
the school year, we had 
planned only to teach the 

follow-up General class and 
a small Advanced class at 
the Danvers site But there 
were so many calls for a 
Novice class, we quickly or- 
ganized two new Novice 
classes in both Danvers and 
Swampscott 

Other Sites 

Other room ideas I 
checked out and will prob- 
ably use at later dates were 
the local hospital where our 
repeater is housed, the Boys 
Clubs and Girls Clubs, the 
Red Cross headquarters, a 
private nursing home, and 
both state colleges, Where- 
ever you find a suitable 
room, try to contract for it 
for no fee. There will be 
plenty of ways to show the 
landlord your club's appre- 
ciation. Also, don't be sur- 
prised if the landlord, Le., 
the school department, 
asks your club to sign a con- 



tract tor the rooms. They 
must establish responsibili- 
ty for not only the cleanup 
of the premises but also the 
liability in case of an acci- 
dent. 

Our current class is part 
of the very successful adult 

education program of the 
town of Marblehead. Mas- 
sachusetts. It is a coordi- 
nated effort between the 
repeater club, the town, 
and the high school's in- 
dustrial arts department 
One class meets after 
school and the others on 
Thursday nights, Funds col- 
lected from the evening 
program will be used to 
donate station equipment 
to the school's new station. 

Our other class is at the 
Lenox Hill Nursing Home in 
Lynn, Massachusetts It is a 
private institution with 
many handicapped young 
people The director was a 
radio operator during the 
Korean War who immedi- 
ately saw the value of add- 
ing ham radio as a weekly 
activity. We will set up a 
station there (donated by 
Handi-Hams) and have a 
regular schedule of opera- 
tors drop in during the week 
to use it As interest in ham 
radio grows, we will show 
the recently produced 
Dave Bell film on ham radio 
to the patients, I'm sure we 
will have a small group of 
people interested enough 
to start teaching code and 
theory. 

Our final teaching effort 
for this year will be a similar 
wintertime project at the 
Greater Lynn Boys Club. As 
an urban club, its member- 
ship swells in the winter 
months, and not all young 
people enjoy sports. These 
5th, bth, and 7th graders 
could turn out to be the fu- 
ture electronic technicians 
this country needs, 

Finding Students 

Armed with the results of 
the original test mailing, it 
was time to find more po- 
tential students. In advertis- 
ing for our first class, an- 



58 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



nouncernents were sent out 
by rnail to all the high 
schools, junior high schools, 
vocational schools, col- 
leges, community centers, 
scout groups, and other ham 
clubs. A news release was 
also sent to all the news- 
papers, radio stations, and 
local magazines And final- 
ly, posters were put up in 
the electronics stores, 
Heathkit* store, both ham 
stores, and local surplus 
emporiums. When having a 
class for the first time, you 
can never advertise too 
much. After logging the 
answers to the question of 
how the students heard 
about your class, you can 
decide which advertising 
media worked best 

Table 1 shows the results 
over a six-month period of 
sending out the announce- 
ments of the course and 
logging all the return calls. 
Using these statistics, much 
less advertising effort was 
required for our second and 
third classes. A small poster 
at the Heathkit store and 
Tufts Radio in Medford, 
Massachusetts, generated 
about 50% of the calls. The 
rest came from a small 
news item that reappeared 
weekly for four weeks in 
the local newspaper. 

Careful selection of 

which newspaper to use 
was also a factor. In the 
towns we teach in, the resi- 
dents all seem to read the 
smaller weekly papers that 
have a weekly events col- 
umn The one I chose was a 
weekly tabloid with more 
real estate ads and com- 
munity news items than dai- 
ly news. 

Most students, when 
queried, said they saw or 
heard about the classes 
from more than one source. 
Many not only read about it 
in the newspapers, but 
heard about it from a re- 
peater member or on the 
CB band On a few occa- 
sions, I would answer ques- 
tions about the class or ham 
radio in general on the CB 
band. 



Once you've gone this far 
and generated all this inter- 
est, be prepared for the 
phone to start ringing. Find 
a retired or handicapped 
ham who is home a lot to 
take and log all the calls. 
He must be prepared to ex- 
plain all facets of ham radio 
and mail out the ARRL's 
supplied material Many 
people will call and not at- 
tend the next class, so it is 
important that they stay on 
your mailing list. 

When writing announce- 
ments for the media, keep 
them as formal as possible. 
They should be typed on 
the club's letterheads and 
be neat. You want to con- 
vey that the organization 
running the classes is a pro- 
fessional one, When writing 
anything for the students, I 
wanted to project that ham 
radio is a relaxing, informal 
hobby, To help create this 
informal atmosphere, I al- 
ways hand-wrote the an* 
nouncements for the stu- 
dents. We always stress that 
anyone who puts in the ef- 
fort and learns the required 
code will get the help they 
need to get their ticket — no 
matter how long it takes. 

Many students who don't 
pass the course the first 
time will be hesitant to 
come again unless you have 
this relaxed atmosphere. In- 
formality helps break down 
many barriers between the 
teachers and the students. 

Teamwork 

When it is possible, have 
three instructors for each 
Novice class. Two will al- 
ternate teaching the theory 
and the other will teach 
code and give exams, (f any 
one of the three is absent, 
and that will happen, there 
will always be a back-up in- 
structor who knows the stu- 
dents and the lesson plan. 
You can delegate one of 
them to handle all the 
paperwork. In our program, 
I do all the paperwork and 
advertising and leave the in- 
structors to do what they do 
best. 




NOVICE CLASS 

WR1AAC 



NORTH SHORE REPEATER ASSOC, INC. 

pge+f+xi SALEM, MASS, 

****** £ M4T 






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This is a typical announcement that was mailed to potential 
students. It was changed to offer a Novice class on short 

notice. 



General and Advanced 
classes only require one 
teacher who is an active 
ham, By active, I mean one 
who has worked all modes 
and all bands. It is less im- 
portant that you have a 
backup instructor for these 
classes, as the General stu- 
dents can always sit in on 
the Novice classes. The un- 
licensed Novices will have 
fun that night because they 
can spend the night asking 
the Generals questions 
about the hobby. 

[f you have only one 
Novice instructor, keep the 
class size as small as possi- 
ble. One teacher can only 
handle about ten struggling 
Novices. We had no inten- 
tions of offering a Novice 
class during one session, 
but when 22 students 
showed up, a volunteer was 
called on the repeater and 
he gave it a good try His 
passing rate was much 
lower than our other 



classes, 

Opening Night 

The most important 
meeting is always the first. 
For the first course we ran. 
on the first night, the four 
instructors all talked about 
some aspect of ham radio 
that they were into, public 
service, DX, RTTY, ATV, 
and CW, but this didn't 
work. Murphy's Law of 
boasting took over and 
each ham tried to out-talk 
the other. Too much materi- 
al was covered. We didn't 
remember that the students 
were there because they al- 
ready knew something 
about ham radio 

The correct first-night 
procedure should be to 
show one of the League's 
films. They cover all as- 
pects of the hobby in 30 to 
45 minutes. After showing 
the film, you can go right in- 
to the first night's lesson. 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 59 









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One o/ the weelc/y handouts. 



Other first-night chores 
include introducing the 
teachers and having all the 
students introduce them- 
selves. It is also helpful to 
have them tell why they 
came to the class and ex- 
plain their communications 
experience. 

Keeping the Interest 

In most classes, the drop- 
out rate was as high as 
50%, and they all dropped 
out within the first few 
weeks of code lessons. To 
keep student attention dur 
ing this period, we tried to 
provide some sort of a 
handout at each class They 
were either a small elec- 
tronic part r catalog from«n 
electronics company, or a 
printed sheet on antennas 
or circuits. We also brought 
in a different piece of ham 
gear each week to discuss. 
We were trying to string 
along the slow learners so 
they wouldn't get discour- 
aged. Many of these meth 
ods worked. 

Ham radio, like all hob- 
bies, has its magazines, 
stores, and clubs. To help 
out aspiring Novices, each 



class has its own booklet. 
The booklet contains a 
short message from the 
sponsors, dates of meet- 
ings, teachers' names and 
calls, local repeaters to lis- 
ten to on their scanners, 
W1AW code schedules, 
recommended magazines, 
parts stores, study guides, 
code tape sources, club 
meeting sites and times, 
and a ten-point check list 
on buying their first rig. 

Since our repeater is lo- 
cated on the North Shore of 
Massachusetts, the booklet 
is entitled An Introduction 
to Ham Radio on the North 
Shore, With each new class, 
we add additional informa- 
tion we feel is needed, as 
most of us forget a lot of 
these facts ourselves. This 
booklet is also good as a 
ham radio public relations 

tool. 

At each class after that 
you can pass out the other 
sheets and catalogs previ 
ously mentioned. Other 
good handouts we used 
were reprints of Novice arti- 
cles, flea-market flyers, and 
old issues of ham radio 
magazines that came from 



the club members The 
local Heathkit manager was 
not only a great help in sup- 
plying books, but also sup- 
plied catalogs, space for 
our posters, and a small kit 
for no charge. The printed 
circuit board, after hav- 
ing been assembled, was 
brought into a Heathkit 
store for checking. If it were 
properly built, it acted like 
an oscillator It was a good 
gimmick for all involved. 

Final Handout 

The final handout should 
be an SASE or postcard for 
the students to mail back 
with their callsign I usually 
put it this way; We need to 
know if our teaching efforts 
were successful —please let 
us know your callsign, and, 
if you didn't pass the exam, 
let us know if you want to 
try again. All students are 
so proud and so grateful for 
your help, that very few 
don't return the cards, 
Sometimes they are like 
QSL cards; a few will show 
up months later from other 
states because the students 
have moved. 

Fol low-Up 

At this point, you might 
think that you've done your 
part. Not so! Most new 
hams will need some en- 
couragement to get 
through that first CW con- 
tact. The club should start a 
slow-speed CW net that 
meets at least once a week. 
This is a good way to get 
other club members active 
in helping out the educa- 
tional committee. Also, 
anyone who doesn't get a li- 
cense should stay on your 
mailing list for future class- 
es. We heard many person- 
al reasons for dropping out 
of classes, but in a lot of 
cases they would sign up 
for another class at a more 
convenient time. 

Registration Forms 

In making up registration 
forms for both the repeater 
club and our classes, we ask 
for all the pertinent infer 



matton such as name, nick- 
name, address, town, sum- 
mer address, zip codes, 
phone number, mailing ad- 
dress, if different, home and 
work phone numbers, 
bands active on, mobile or 
portable capabilities, and, 
finally, these important 
questions First, how did 
you hear about the class? 
This will give you ideas on 
which advertising works 
best 

Second, what is your |ob 
or profession? This question 
is usually overlooked by 
clubs and here is why it's 
important In the class- 
room, if the teacher knows 
everyone's backgound and 
jobs, he can draw on those 
talents in making analogies. 
This shows your interest in 
the students and if the 
club's board of directors 
has access to a list of what 
each member does for a liv- 
ing, they can draw from this 
group for meeting pro- 
grams. 

Clubs and classes are al- 
ways in need of new speak- 
ers on both technical sub- 
jects and human interest 
stories. One good example 
of this was a husband who 
called to sign his wife up for 
a Novice class. In the con- 
versation I found out that 
he was an Advanced class 
ham who was the new 
Belden cable salesman for 
the area. He was glad to 
talk to both the club and 
classes! 

Deadlines 

When printing up your 
class registration forms, 
always make the deadline 
for enrollment at least one 
week before your first 
night, This allows you to 
know exactly how much 
material you will need It 
was a big surprise, at one 
first meeting, to have 20 
more people show up for a 
Novice class than the 30 
who had sent in checks If 
you have a small class and 
decide to supply textbooks 
for them, it takes at least 
two weeks to procure them. 



60 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



Our first attempt included 
the ARRL's Tune in the 
World which required care- 
ful guess work on the pro- 
jected number of attend- 
ees. In later classes, we 
purchased ample supplies 
of the League's or Ameco's 
question-and-answer-style 
books. 

Money 

Having a total of 11 
classes over three years 
with fees ranging to $25 per 
family member, we gener- 
ated plenty of money to 
purchase all the supplies, 
code tapes, slide programs, 
books, and teachers' guides. 
Since I was the chairman of 
our educational commit- 
tee, I usually decided what 
else the money was spent 
on. 

As a club, we recently 
gave the town and high 
school libraries in three 
communities the ARRL's 
complete set of current 
publications. The League 



will sell any affiliated club 
this package for only $55. 
All six librarians were gra- 
cious enough to accept the 
donations at our annual 
meeting for the installation 
of new officers A picture 
was taken and a small arti- 
cle appeared in the local 
paper about the books and 
our new officers, It was a 
good ham radio PR move. 

Even if your club decides 
to underwrite the costs of 
the class, it's still important 
to charge for the class. I've 
argued this point many 
times over the air, but I am 
convinced the $10 or so you 
charge makes the student 
feel he has made a commit- 
ment No student has ever 
questioned our fees, and 
many have made other do- 
nations. When asked what 
happened to the money, I 
always explained the 
Handi-Ham System, be- 
cause all the extra funds 
were used to put the handi- 
capped on the air. 



Thank You 

By donating books and 
new ham gear to the towns 
and school systems that 
provided rooms for our use, 
we had thanked them in our 
own way. In some other 
nearby communities, the 
ham radio instructors are 
paid as paid regular teach- 
ers in the evening school. 
None of my instructors gets 
any money out of our proj- 
ects, but in my own way I 
showed them my apprecia- 
tion. 

After two years of teach- 
ing one night a week, my 
ten instructors had spent a 
lot of time teaching ham 
radio. I know that they 
would have been happy 
enough with the students' 
individual thank-yous, but 
that was not enough. My 
wife and I had the instruc- 
tors over to our home, with 
their wives, for a dinner par- 
ty. I wanted them and espe^ 
c rally their wives to know 



how special this group was 
to me I got a lot of thank- 
yous from the students and 
club members, but it was 
this group who actually got 
the teaching done- 
After you organize your 
first class, no matter how 
large or small, and the first 
happy Novice calls up to 
say, "I just got my call- 
sign - KA1 FCC/' you'll 
know why we don't want to 
stop organizing them. If 
you think there aren't any 
people interested in ham 
radio classes for you to 
teach, then start by generat- 
ing interest I don't know 
how many classes we will 
help run over the next few 
years, but with the help of 
my fellow club members, 
the Courage Center, an un- 
derstanding boss, and espe- 
cially my wife, I look for- 
ward to many more happy 
Novices and Generals call- 
ing up to say "thank 
you."B 



ASSOCIATED RADIO 

8012 CONSER BOX 4327 
OVERLAND PARK. KANSAS 66904 



BUY 

All Brands New & Reconditioned 



313-381 -5900 



TRADE 






f I 



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££? 



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We Want to DEAL— Call Us— We'll Do It Your Way. 

WE'RE #1 



1 



master charge 



\j 



NOTE: SEND S1.00 FOR OUR CURRENT CATALOG OF NEW AND RECONDITIONED EQUIPMENT. 

* ALSO WE PERIODICALLY PUBLISH A LIST OF UNSERVICED EQUIPMENT AT GREAT SAVINGS. 

A BONANZA FOR THE EXPERIENCED OPERATOR 

TO OBTAIN THE NEXT UNSERVICED BARGAIN LIST SEND A SELF ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE, 



73 Magazine • February, 1961 61 



How FCC Rules Are Made 

a labyrinthine tale 



Carey P. Busbin WD4DAZ 
541 Broadway 
Birmingham Ai 35209 



I! think it appropriate to 
J begin this discussion with 
a brief history of radio 
transmission and subse- 



quent regulation Federal 
regulation of interstate 

electrical communication 
can be traced to the Post 



Roads Act of 1866, which 
authorized the Postmaster 
General to fix rates annual- 
ly for government tele- 



*£TWQ#/t fftQumr 

SPECfAL STAFF 



THE COMMJSSWNEffS 
CHARLES O FEXftfS, CHAWMAH 



IF E LEE 
ABBOTT 0A5tiBi*m 

rrrrpMF sr&wn 



JAMES H OUELLO 
JQSfPN & FOSAffTr 
P JOM^S 




OFFtCE Of Ptt&L fC AFFAtftS 

CONSUME* ASSISTANCE 
Dl -J I Si ON 

INDUSTRY EEO AMD MINORITY 
ENTERPRISE DIVISION 

PUBLIC INFORMATION 0* VISION 



OPFtCE OF CtNEffAl COUNSEL 

ADMINISTRATIVE LAW a LEGISLATION 
DIVISION 

LITIGATION 0IVI5I0N 



BROADCAST BUREAU 

BROADCAST FACILITIES DIVISION 

COMPLAINTS COMPLIANCE DIVISION 

BEARING DIVISION 

LICENSE DIVISION 

OFFICE OF NETWORK STUDY 

POLICY AND RULES OIVI5ION 

RENEWAL B TRANSFER DIVISION 



Office or opmtOHS a 

fftiStFW 



OFFICE OF SCIENCE B TECHNOLOGY 

INTERNATIONAL a OPERATIONS DIVISION 
LABORATORY DIVISION 

RESEARCH a STANDARDS DIVISION 
SPECTRUM ALLOCATIONS OiVtSlQN 
PLAINING AND COORDINATING STAFF 




OFffC€ OF ADWNISTfiATtVE 
LAW JUDGES 



OFFfCE OF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DIVISION 
DATA AUTOMATION ENVlSrON 
EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION 
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT DIVISION 
INTERNAL RE VIEW a SECURITY DIVISION 
MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS DIVISION 
PERSONNEL DIVISION 
PROCUREMENT DIVISION 
RECORDS MANAGEMENT DIVISION 
THE SECRETARY 



F/ElO OPERATIONS BumAU 

ENFORCEMENT DIVISION 

ENGINEERING DIVISION 
REGIONAL DIVISION 
VIOLATIONS OlVlStQN 



FiELO INSTALLATIONS 



CABLE TELEW5/0H BUREAU 

POLICY REVIEW a DEVELOPMENT 
DIVISION 

RECORDS & SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT 
DIVISION 

RESEARCH DIVISION 

SPECIAL RELIEF & MICROWAVE 
DIVISION 



COMMON CA/rWfJt BUREAU 

COMPLIANCE B LITIGATION TASK FORCE 
INTERNATIONAL PR OGHAM 5 STAFF 
PROGRAM EVALUATION STAFF 



ACCOUNTING a AUDITS DIVISION 
ECONOMICS DIVISION 
FACILITIES ft SERVICES DIVISION 
HEARING DIVISION 
MOBILE SERVICES DIVISION 
POLICY a RULES DIVISION 
TARIFF DIVISION 

FIELD OFFICE 



PRIVATE RAOiO BUREAU 

MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATIVE 
STAFF 

COMPLIANCE DIVISION 
LICENSING DIVISION 
POLICY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION 
RULES DIVISION 



Fig. 7, FCC organization. 



62 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



grams. This was followed 
by the Interstate Commerce 
Act of 1887, which granted 
the Interstate Commerce 
Commission (ICC) authority 
to require interconnection 
of telegraph systems to ex- 
pand coverage across the 
country. Then, the Vann- 
Elkins Act of 1910 directed 
the ICC to develop uniform 
accounting practices for 
these telegraph systems. 
This statute, in effect, ex- 
tended provisions of exist^ 
ing law to cover certain 
wireless telegraphy. By 
1910, wireless radio trans- 
missions had proven worth- 
while aboard ships, and the 
Wireless Ship Act of 1910 
required radio installation 
on large seagoing passenger 
vessels, 

Two years later, the 
United States participated 
in the International Radio 
Telegraph Conference. 
Conference findings were 
the basis for the Radio Act 
of 1912. This Act regulated 
emissions, distress calls, set 
aside frequencies for gov- 
ernment use, and mandated 
licensing. Licensing began 
later that year 

World War I ensued, and 
the Federal Government ex- 
ercised control of radio, 
telephone, and telegraph as 
a precautionary measure. 
After the war, a tremendous 
growth in broadcast radio 
occurred. Broadcast radio 
had been unregulated by 
the legislation of 1912, 
which prompted President 
Coolidge to request of Con- 
gress the authority to con- 
trol this growth. Congress 
responded with the Dill- 
White Radio Act of 1927. 
This Act established a five- 
member Federal Radio 
Commission under the Sec- 
retary of Commerce, with 
regulatory powers over 
radio. 

Broadcast radio contin- 
ued to prosper, and in 1934 

Franklin D Roosevelt asked 
Congress to approve the es- 
tablishment of an indepen- 



dent commission to regu- 
late radio transmissions. 
Congress responded by 
passing the Communica- 
tions Act of 1934. This Act 
contained six major sec- 
tions, or titles, and created 
the seven-member Federal 
Communications Commis- 
sion (FCC) as we know it to- 
day. 

There were extensive re- 
visions to this Act, both in 
1952 and during the period 
of 1960 to 1962 More re- 
cently, the Communica- 
tions Satellite Act of 1962 
gave the FCC new responsi- 
bilities in the areas of space 
communications- Thus, 
over a period of time, Con- 
gress delegated authority to 
the FCC to govern radio; 
therefore, the Commission 
may develop regulations as 
they feel necessary to carry 
out these responsibilities. 

Organization of the FCC 

The seven commission- 
ers are appointed for seven 
years by the President with 
the approval of the Senate. 
The Commission's chair- 
man is selected by and 
serves at the pleasure of the 
President- The commis- 
sioners function as a unit, 
supervising all FCC activi- 
ties. This is accomplished 
by delegating responsibili- 
ties to boards and staff 
units, Fig, 1 shows a current 
organizational chart for the 
FCC [amateur radio is with- 
in the Private Radio 
Bureau) 

Rule Making 

In order for the FCC to 
regulate radio transmis- 
sions as directed, the FCC 
must develop rules and reg- 
ulations. Fig. 2 shows the 
pathway which a new Rule 
Making may follow. Using 
Fig. 2, lef s begin at step 1 
and follow a request for 
either a new rule or a rule 
change through the entire 
process. 

Step 1. Initiation of Ac- 
tion. Any individual repre- 
sented by one of the five 



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Fig. 2. FCC Rule Making diagram (from FCC Communicator, 

September, 1975). 



groups may initiate a Rule 
Making. 

Step 2, FCC When a peti- 
tion for Rule Making is re- 
ceived, it is sent to the ap- 
propriate Bureau for evalu- 
ation (the Private Radio 
Bureau for amateur regula- 
tions). If the Bureau decides 
a petition is meritorious, it 
will request that the 
Dockets Section assign a 
Rule Making {RM) number. 
The Bureau may then re- 
quest one of four actions by 
the Commission as shown. 
A free weekly summary of 
Commission actions, FCC 
Actions Alert, is available 
from the FCC; the address 
for obtaining this publica- 
tion will be found at the end 
of the 'Publications" sec- 
tion. 

Step 3- Commission Ac- 
tions. If the Rule Making 
would require major 
changes in the rules, the 
Commission will issue 
either a Notice of Inquiry 
(NOI) or an Notice of Pro- 
posed Rule Making 
(NPRM) When either an 
NOI or an NPRM is request- 
ed, such a request will ap- 
pear both in the Federal 
Register and the FCC Ac- 



tions Alert. The NOI is basi- 
cally to see if there is 
enough public interest to 
merit further consideration. 
The NPRM is an official an- 
nouncement that a new 
rule is being considered If 
the Commission feels that 
the proposal did not merit 
further consideration, they 
would issue a Memoran- 
dum Opinion and Order 
(MO), which would stop the 
action. The NOI usually 
leads to either an NPRM or 
an MO. An NPRM usually 
leads to a Report and Order 
(RO) or an MO. The RO 
either issues a new rule or 
amends and confirms an ex- 
isting rule. 

Step 4. Comments and 

Replies Evaluated. When an 
NOI or an NPRM is issued, 
the FCC solicits public com- 
ment. Replies to public 
comments are also solic- 
ited Any comment or reply 
should reference the Dock- 
et Number. 

Step 5. Report and Order. 
An RO is issued to institute 
a new rule, amend an exist- 
ing rule, or confirm the cur- 
rent rule- 
Step 6, Reconsideration. 
Petitions for reconsidera- 



73 Magazine * February, 1981 63 






MEMORY KEYER 
BREAKTHROUGH ! 




The remarkable AEA Morsematie memory keyer 
has 35 fantastic features including two AEA 
designed microcomputers, up to 2,000 character 
memory, automatic serial number, beacon mode, 
and automatic morse trainer mode. 

T«L 81 3-461 -HAMS 

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Clearwater, FL 33515 





Brings you the 
Breakthrough! 



tion must be filed within 30 
days. 

Step 7, Modifications, A 
review of a petition for re- 
consideration may merit a 
change in the initial deci- 
sion. The Commission may 
issue an MO to amend the 
initial decision. 

Commenting 

If you intend to file com- 
ments, the following sub- 
jects should be addressed, 
First, state your experience, 
expertise, and any insights 
which make your judg- 
ments accurate and worth- 
while. Second, any facts, 
comments, or opinions 
should be clearly stated in 
easily understood fashion. 
Third, your comments 
should reach the Commis- 
sion on or before the com- 
ment deadline. Moreover, if 
you intend to submit com- 
ments as a formal filing, 
you must submit an original 
and five copies. Comments 
should be submitted to: 



Secretary, Federal Commu- 
nications Commission, 1 91 9 

M Street NW, Washington 
DC 20554, Be sure to note 
the Docket Number on the 
comments. 

To help in filing com- 
ments, the next section will 
outline various materials 
available on the subject 
and where they may be ob- 
tained. These publications 
will add clarity to FCC poli- 
cies and procedures. 

Publications 

A) Federal Register, a dai- 
ly publication from the U.S. 
Government which covers 
both proposed and official 
changes in regulations pre- 
pared by government agen- 
cies. The FCC is just one of 
hundreds of agencies and 
commissions which publish 
regulations in the Federal 
Register. A subscription 
may be obtained for $50 
yearly from the Superin- 
tendent of Documents. The 



Federal Register is usually 
available at libraries in 
most areas. 

B) FCC Actions Alert, a 
weekly bulletin published 
by the FCC containing Com- 
mission actions The FCC 
Actions Alert is available 
without charge from the 
FCC. 

C) FCC Reports contain 
complete texts of FCC re- 
ports and actions and is 
available for a fee from the 
Superintendent of Docu- 
ments. 

D) FCC Rules and Regula- 
tions is a looseleaf subscrip- 
tion service which continu- 
ally updates the FCC regu- 
lations covered by that par- 
ticular subscription. In 
order to cover all FCC Rules 
and Regulations, several 
separate subscriptions 
would be required. Infor- 
mation concerning which 
parts each subscription 
covers and how they may 
be ordered will be found in 
the U.S. Government Print- 
ing Office pamphlet 
SB-281, as described below 

E) Federal Communica- 
tions Commission Publica- 
tion SB-281 is a subject bib- 
liography available without 
charge from the Superin- 
tendent of Documents and 
lists all publications avail- 
able from the U.S. Printing 
Office concerning the FCC. 

F) FCC Information Bulle- 
tins are available without 
charge upon request from 
the FCC. Each bulletin 
covers a specific area of the 
FCCs responsibilities or a 
topic of interest to radio en- 
thusiasts. 

Federal Register, FCC Re- 
ports, FCC Rules and Regu- 
lations, and subject bibli- 
ography SB-281 are avail- 
able from: Superintendent 
of Documents, U-S, Govern- 
ment Printing Office, Wash- 
ington DC 20402. 

FCC Actions Alert and 
FCC Information Bulletins 
are available from: Federal 
Communications Commis- 
sion, 1919 M Street NW, 
Washington DC 20554. 



Summary 

Amateur radio clubs 
should be apprised of pro- 
posed changes in FCC regu- 
lations which affect 

amateur radio- Too often 
over the last few years, we 
learned that we were the 
subject of substantial 
changes without sufficient 
prior notice. Because of 
printing and mailing lead 
times necessary with pub- 
lishing magazines, it is very 
possible that the FCC com- 
ment period is long over by 
the time you receive the 
current issue containing the 
notice- This can be avoided 
by having the club or a re- 
sponsible mdividual placed 
on the FCC Actions Alert 
mailing list (see "Publica- 
tions"). If a Rule Making 
concerning amateur radio 
is received, then the mem- 
bership can be notified. In 
addition, the FCC maintains 
two phone numbers, one 
for general information 
from the Public Informa- 
tion Officer. (202>632-7260, 
and the second, a recorded 
message concerning week- 
ly actions, at (202 >6 32-0002 
(neither is toll-free). 

As you know, the trend 
regarding frequencies has 
been "use them or lose 
them"; the same is true of 
Rule Makings. Failure by 
the FCC to receive a num- 
ber of comments on pro- 
posals means to the regula- 
tor that there is little or no 
interest in the subject; 
therefore, they should pro- 
ceed with their proposals. 
Many times this just isn't 
true. Therefore, I suggest 
that you as an individual or 
club member monitor FCC 
Rule Makings, perhaps 
even suggesting changes in 
amateur regulations which 
you feel merit considera- 
tion. Your very participa- 
tion will help ensure the 
place of amateur radio in 
the future. ■ 

Acknowledgement 

A portion of the information 
contained in this article was ob* 
tained from the Federal Com- 
munications Commission. 



64 73 Magazine ■ February, 1961 



REVIEW 



from page 32 

the manual, "The quality of copy 
is directly proportional to the 
quality of the signal being 
received as well as the quality of 
the CW being received. If you 
are trying to copy a guy with a 
sloppy fist, then you'd better ex- 
pect sloppy copy. If, on the other 
hand, the CW is being sent by a 
heyer or a keyboard, the copy 
will probably be perfect." Amen. 
If you intend to use the ROM-1 16 
for serious CW reception, get a 
good CW fitter and talk only to 
people who can send well! 
Whatever conclusions you draw 
about machine-read CW, the 
transmit portion of the ROM-116 
is faultless. It is easy to use, 
sends perfectly, and even allows 
you to start typing a reply while 
receiving a message. 

By necessity, this is only a 
brief overview of the capabilities 
of the ROM-116; it has many in- 
triguing features that are not 
mentioned in this review. How 
did it perform in the real world? 
Superbly, It is at the top of its 
class. With equipment like this 
on the market, the old stalwarts 
are going to have to brace them- 
selves for an Influx of en- 
thusiastic operators using com- 
puter-based RTTY gear. Few 
people who listen in on the RTTY 
segments of the band will be 
surprised if RTTY operation 
begins to spread out and take 
more spectrum. Things are al- 
ready pretty crowded! A device 
like the ROM-116 will attract a 
lot of people to RTTY who would 
never have considered it before 
— people like me! 

There is one big if that de- 
serves mentioning. Microcom- 
puters, to varying degrees, can 
emit a lot of hash into the rf 
spectrum. If your computer is 
unshielded {as is the TRS-60), 
you may or may not hear a great 
deal of noise In your receiver, all 
generated by the computer. In 
the 73 shack, using unshielded 
interconnecting cables and 
making absolutely no effort to 
reduce interference, the prob- 
lem was there, but it wasn't 
severe. Weak signal work could 
suffer some interference, but 
the problem was not as bad as 
we expected. Best of all, the 



combined efforts of our A[pha 
374 and Dentfon MLA-2500 am- 
plifiers did not cause any inter 
ference to the RTTY system, 
even while operating RTTY and 
SS8 simultaneously. 

This is the dilemma that hams 
face when they go shopping for 
a microcomputer-based RTTY 
system: Do they buy a complete- 
ly RFI-proofed system that of- 
fers limited or non-existent use 
as a separate computer, or do 
they go for a microcomputer 
and interface system that can 
be extremely useful when the 
bands go dead, but may or may 
not need some work to clean up 
RFI? If getting dual usage out of 
your equipment appeals to you, 
the Crown Microproducts ROM- 
116 deserves your attention; it's 
a first class piece of gear that 
you'll never grow out of. For fur- 
ther information, contact Crown 
Microproducts, PO Box 892> 
Marysviite WA 98270, Reader 
Service number 478, 

Paul Grupp KA1LR 
73 Magazine Staff 

REALISTIC PRa2008 

Radio Shack's latest intro- 
duction to the scanner market, 
the PRO-2008 t provides the 
Public Service Band enthusiast 
with an interesting blend of tra- 
ditional and unique features. 
The new, stay*at*home relative 
of the popular PRO-2001 is de- 
signed to be a lower-priced al- 
ternative for those whose listen- 
ing needs require a smaller num- 
ber of channels without a 
searching capability, The 2008 
is a 1980 addition to the Realis- 
tic family of scanning monitors 
and is midway in price and per- 
formance between the most ex- 
pensive crystal-controlled scan- 
ners and the more sophisticated 
synthesized models 

The 2008 is a programmable 
FM scanning receiver with di- 
rect keyboard entry system, 
capable of scanning any eight 
frequencies in the ranges 30-60, 
144-174, and 410-512 MHz. The 
entire unit is controlled by an on- 
board microprocessor designed 
especially for use in this scan- 
ning monitor The microproces- 
sor is accessed via the 18-key 

Continued on page 1 1 7 




A recent survey showed that 20% of the 73 subscribers also read 
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73 Magazine • February, 1981 65 



MFJ 94 1C Versa Tuner II 




MFJ-941C 



$89 



$*) 



Fastest selling MFJ tuner because it has 

Ihe most wanied features at the best price. 

SWR + dual range wattmeter (300 & 30 

watts full scale, forward and reflected 

power). Sensitive meter measures SWR 

down to 5 watts output. 

More flexible antenna switch selects 2 coax 

lines, direct or through tuner, random wire/ 

balanced line, or tuner bypass for dummy 

load. 

12 position efficient airwound inductor for 

lower losses, more watts out. 



Built-in 4:1 hatun for balanced lines. UX)0v 

capacitor spacing 

Matches everything from 1641-10 meters: 

di poles, inverted vees, random wires, verti- 
cals, mobile whips, beams, balanced and 
coax lines, 

Easy to use, anywhere. Measures Sx2x6'\ 
has 50*239 connectors* 5- way binding 
posts, finished in eggshell white with 
walnut- e rained sides. 

MFJ-945. $79.95, like model 94 IC but less 
ant. switch. Optional mobile bracket for 
either model is S 



MFJ 484 "Grandmaster' 9 Memory Keyer 




MFJ-484 



$139 



95 



Up to twelve 25 character messages plus 
100, 75, 50 or 25 eh messages (4096 bits). 
Repeat am message continuously or with 
pauses of up lo 2 min- LEDs show use 
Record, playback, or change messages 
instantly at touch of a button. Memories are 
resettabie with button or touch of the paddle. 
Built-in memory saver — 9 V battery takes 
over when power is lost, 
Iambic operation with squeeze key. Dot- 
dash insertion. Optional BENCHER paddle 
$42.95 +$4. 

Dot-Dash memories, self-completing, jam- 
proof spacing, instant start, 

MFJ 41 "Professor Morse" 
Code Generator/Keyer 



Panel controls: Speed < 8-50 wpin)/ Record; 
Weight/Memories Combined; Tone/Tune: 
Delay (0-2 mi n I/ Repeat; rotary Vol/On-Off: 
Memory Select: Message Buttons select 
desired 25 eh. messages; Memory Reset 
button 

Utra reliable solid state keying: grid block, 
cathode, solid Male transmitters \ - 300 V, 10 
mA max; +300 V, 1 00 itiA max I. Operates 
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Use it to learn, use it to operate* It sends 
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practice; never repeats sequences. And when 
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Vary speed from 5- 5$ wpm; meter readout . 
Vary spacing; give fast sound to low speed. 
Alpha or alphanumeric \*uh punctuation, 
Built-in speaker and phone jack; tone and 
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Full feature keyer includes vol*, speed, tone 
and weight controls, tune switch, dot -dash 
memories, keys gnd block, cathode, solid- 
state rigs. Optional BENCHER paddle 
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$7 95 +$2 Size 7*2x6' Get "Professor 
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Constant output as bandwidth is varied: 
linear frequent > control. 
Switchable noise fi miter for impulse noise 
Simulated stereo sound for CYV lets ears 
and mind reject QRM. 
Inputs for 2 rigs, switch selectable, Plugs 
into phone jack. Two watts tor speaker. OFF 
b> passes filter 9- IK VDC, 300 mA or 1 10 
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x6"> MFJ 751, $69.95, similar, primary 
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KW Dummy Load With Oil 




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MFJ-250 



Rated at I kW CW or 2 k\V PEP for 10 
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300 Watt Antenna Timer 



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Box 494; Mississippi Stale, MS 39762 



66 73 Magazine • February, 1981 





For $279.95 you get: CW, Baudot, ASCII, buffer, 
programmable and automatic messages. Morse code 
practice, full featured keyer, human engineering. 



Sending CW has always been a task, especial 
Jy when you get a little tired. Electronic keyers 
help, but it's still too much work. 

Now MFJ has a Super Keyboard that makes 
sending perfect CW effortless. It also sends Baudot 
RTTY and ASCII. 

"Srg deal" you say. "What's so special about 
that. There are lots ol keyboards ." Yes, but this 
one is different 

HUMAN ENGINEERED 
A lot of thought has gone into human engi- 
neering the MFJ 494 Super Keyboard. 
For example, you press only a one or two key 

sequence to execute any command. 

All controls and keys are positioned logically 
and labeled clearly for instant recognition. 

Pots are used tor speed, volume, tone, and 
weight because they are more human oriented 
than keystroke sequences and they remember 
your settings. 

A meter gives continuous readout of buffer 
memory and speed. Two characters before full, 
the meter lights up red and the sidetone changes 
pitch. 

PROGRAMMABLE, AUTOMATIC MESSAGES 

Four automatic messages and two program- 
mable message memories (A and B) are provided. 
Messages A and 8 can be a total of 30 charac- 
ters. B starts where A ends. 

When recalled, each message takes onty one 
character of the buffer. They may be chained 
and/or repeated via the buffer. 

"Weil," you say, "that sure is not much 
memory." But it's more than it seems because ol 
the built-in automatic messages. 



For example, type your call into message A. 
Then by pressing the CO button you send CO CO 
DE (message A). Press twice to send twice, etc. 

The other automatic messages work the same 
way: CQ TEST 0E (message A), DE (message A), 
ORZ (message A), 

Special keys for KN n SK, BT, AS, A A, and AR. 

TEXT BUFFER 

The 50 character text buffer sends smooth 
perfect code even if you "hunt and peck," 

Since each automatic or programmable mes^ 
sage takes only one buffer character, this gives 
a far larger effective buffer. 

You can preload a message into the buffer. 
Then when you are ready to transmit press the 
control key. 

You can hold the buffer by pressing the shift 
key and space bar, 

With the buffer in hold, you can send a com- 
ment with an external paddle as a keyer. To re 
sume sending buffer, press the control key 

Simply backspace to delete errors. 

RTTY: BAUDOT, ASCII 

5 level Baudot is transmitted at 60 WPM, 
RTTY and CW ID are provided via message A. 

Carriage return, fine feed, and "LTRS" are sent 
automatically on the first space after 63 charac 
ters on a line After 70 characters the function 
is initiated without a space. This gives unbroken 
words at the receiving end and frees you from 
sending the carnage return. 

All up and down shift is done automatically. 
A downshift occurs on every space to quickly 
clear any garbles in reception. 



The buffer, programmable and automatic mes- 
sages, backspace delete and PTT control (keys 
your rig} are included. 

The ASCII mode includes all the features of 

baudot. Transmission speed is 110 baud. Both 
upper and lower case are generated. 

MORSE CODE PRACTICE 

There are two Morse code practice modes. 
Mode 1: random length groups of random charac 
ters. Mode 2: pseudo random 5 character groups 
in 8 separate repeatable list. With answer list. 

Insert space between characters and groups 
to form high speed characters at slower speed 
for easy character recognition. 

Select alphabetic only or alphanumeric plus 
punctuation. Pause function lets you stop and 
then resume. 

ITS A KEYER, TOO 

Plug in a paddle to use it as a deluxe full 
feature keyer with automatic and programmable 
memories, iambic operation, dot-dash memories, 
and afl the features of the CW mode. 

MORE FEATURES 

Tune switch with LEO keys transmitter for tun- 
ing. Tune key provides continuous dots to save 
finals. Built-in sidetone and speaker. 

PTT (push to talk} output keys transmitter for 
Baudot and ASCII modes. 

Reliable solid state keying for CW: grid block, 
cathode, solid state transmitters (-300 V, 10 ma. 
Max, +300 V. 100 ma. Max). TTL and open 
collector outputs for RTTY and ASCII, 

Fully shielded. RF proof, Alt aluminum cabinet. 
Black bottom, eggshell white top, 12"D x 7"W x 
1WH (front) x 3Va"H (back), 

9 12 VDC or 110 VAC with optional adapter. 

OPTIONS 

MFJ-53 AFSK PLUG IN MODULE. 170 and 850 
Hz shift. Output plugs into mic or phone patch 
jack for FSK with SSB rigs and AFSK with FM or 
AM rigs. $39,95 ( + $3). 

MFJ 54 LOOP KEYING PLUG-IN MODULE. 300 V. 
60 ma, loop keying circuit drives your RTTY 
printer, Qpto isolated, TTL input for your computer 
to drive your printer. $29.95 ( + $3). 

BENCHER IAMBIC PADDLE, $42.95 ( + $4). 

110 VAC ADAPTER. $7.95 ( + $3). 

A PERSONAL TEST 

Give the MFJ 494 Super Keyboard a personal 
test right in your own ham shack. 

Order one from MFJ and try it — no obligation, 
See how easy it is to operate and how much more 
enjoyable CW and RTTY can be. If not delighted, 
return it within 30 days for refund (tess shipping). 
One year unconditional guarantee. 

To order, call toll tree 800 647 1 BOO. Charge 
VISA, MC or mail check or money order for 
S279.95 for MFJ494 Super Keyboard, S39.95 
for MFJ 53 AFSK module, $29,95 for the MFJ-54 
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TO ORDER OR FOR YOUR NEAREST DEALER 

CALL TOLL FREE 800-647-1800 



Call 601 323 5869 for technical information, 
order/repair status. Also call 601 323 5869 out 
side continental USA and in Mississippi. 

Write for FREE catalog, over 60 products 

ENTERPRISES, 



MFJ 



INCORPORATED 



Box 494, Mississippi State, MS 39762 



v* Reader Service — See page 14€ 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 67 



Paul Danzer NUi 
2 Dawn Road 
NorwalkCT 06651 



A $10 Phone Patch 

CO Ma Bell 



You don't have to spend 
$40 to $90 for a phone 
patch to match your new 
solid-state rig k This simple 
circuit will give perfectly 
adequate performance with 

parts purchased at your lo- 
cal Radio Shack. For a cost 
of under $10 and one eve- 
ning's work, you can have a 
patch that will work with a 
new solid-state rig or an 
older tube-type transceiver. 
This circuit (or variations of 
it) has been in use by sever- 
al hams in this area for a 
number of years (see Fig. 1), 
With the bypass capacitors 



**/ 



orr 



DM 



1 



shown, no effect from rf 
feedback has been experi- 
enced, even when used with 
a kilowatt- 
Si is a four-pole, two-po- 
sition switch (Radio Shack 
275-1384 or equivalent) 
used to switch the patch on 
and off. The fourth section 
of this switch (S1d) is used 
to switch the patch into the 
circuit in place of the usual 
station microphone. If your 
rig has a phone patch input, 
you can leave the mike con- 
nected to its usual jack and 
use the alternate COnneC- 



Off 



SIC 



TELEPHONE 
ItHC 



%\%f 



0#f 



0*1 



00 1 
300 V 



-L OOI 
90QV 




tion shown by the dotted 

line, 

S2 is a DPDT toggle or 
lever switch. It allows you 
to select XMIT (transmit) or 
RCV (receive) from the 
front panel of the patch, 
rather than fumbling with 
the microphone PTT switch, 
telephone handset, and re- 
ceiver audio gain control 
all at once. 



S2 is wired in such a way 
as to permit operation with 
many types of solid-state 
rigs. These rigs often have 
the novel little problem 



T 
I 



00 \ 

50V 



.FROM 
<flEC€lVEfl 
ftUOlO OUTPUT 
JACK 



ffy 



QQf 
90 V 



TO 
LOUDSPEAKER 



X 



ra 

*a tooon 



1 
I 



00 1 
50 V 



AUOlO 
->T0 KNKE JACK 
ON RIG 



vr 




FROM 

MICROPHONE 



TO PH0** 
PATCH IKHJT 
ON RiC 



jK 



MCV 



m-r 



I 



001 
50V 



4 TO PTT 

ITHflOueH Ml«£. 
JACK OH RIG) 



fig, 1. Inexpensive phone patch uses readily available components. 



that the receiver audio is 
not cut completely off 
while in the transmit mode. 
During normal operation 
this is not a problem. How- 
ever, with many of the usu- 
al phone patches, an audio 
oscillation will result, with 
the phone patch acting as 
the oscillator coupling ele- 
ment. Switch S2 discon- 
nects the receiver audio 
from the patch when in the 
transmit mode, thus elimi- 
nating the problem. 

The second section of 
this switch (S2b) grounds 
the PTT line when you wish 
to transmit. On a few of the 
new rigs, this line is called 
MOX rather than PTT. MOX 
stands for Manually Oper- 
ated Xmit, similar to VOX 
for Voice Operated Xmit, 

Impedance matching is 
provided by Tl and T2, 
which are identical 8 Ohm- 
to-TOGO-Ohrn (center- 
tapped) audio transformers. 
Radio Shack lists this item 
as 275-1384. They are not 
critical, and any 8-Ohm-to- 
1000Ohm or&Ohn>to-500- 
Ohm audio transformer will 
do. Good performance has 
been obtained even with a 
pair of 12-volt filament 
transformers The 12-volt 
secondary is connected in 
place of the BOhm winding 
and the 115-volt primary in 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 



place of the 500- or 
1000-Ohm winding. 

The transmit level is set 
by the 500-Ohm pot con- 
nected to T2. Bypass capac- 
itors are shown on all input 
and output leads to prevent 
rf feedback, A metal enclo- 
sure for the patch is recom- 
mended. 

To use the patch, set S1 
to ON and S2 to RCV and 
listen on the telephone 
handset. You can get a clear 
line (no dial tone) by dialing 
the first digit of a local ex- 
change. Tune in a station on 
your receiver and set the 
audio gain control on the 
receiver for a comfortable 
level in the telephone hand- 
set. Telephones are quite 
tolerant and level setting is 
not critical. If the audio 
sounds comfortable in your 
ear on receive while listen- 
ing through the telephone 
handset it probably is ac- 
ceptable, 

Next, put S2 in the XMIT 
position and talk normally 
into the telephone handset. 



Set the 500-Ohm pot so that 
the meter on the final in 
your rig swings into its nor- 
mal area as though you 
were using the station mi- 
crophone 

There is no provision for 
VOX operation. Most hams 
prefer manual RX/TX since 
it both prevents an opera- 
tor's accidental sneeze or 
cough from turning on the 
transmitter and allows you 
to cut off the speaker if he 
or she attempts to say 
something inappropriate 
for transmission over your 
station. 

One tip on phone patch 
use — for some reason, 
when you tell someone on 
the telephone to talk loud- 
er, they will do so for a few 
minutes and then lapse 
back to their orginal vol- 
ume. However, if you turn 
the audio gain control 
down so that they hear the 
other station more softly; 
they will automatically 
speak up as though to com- 
pensate. ■ 



Reach Out! 

just like adding a 10- watt amp 
to your 2-meter hand-held... 



True % wave gain antenna 

Dramatically boosts reception as well 
as transmit range 

Individually tuned matching network 

Base spring/tuned coil protects radio as 
well as antenna from accidents 

Extends to 47". telescopes to only 8" 

BNC connector fits most current hand- 
held and portable radios 

Better than 1.5:1 VSWR across the 
entire 144-148 MHz band 

Only $24.95 from your dealer or 
postpaid from VoCom 

(Illinois residents please include 6% sales tax) 
Ask about our 25, 50 and 100 watt amplifiers for hantf-hefds 




v*m 



VoCom 

PRODUCTS CORPORATION 

65 E. Palatine Rd., Suite 111 
Prospect Heights, IL 60070 

(312) 459-3680 

Dealer Inquiries Invited 




DOWNCONVERTERS 



HAL 2304 MHz Down converters (frequency range: 20OQ MH2J2500 MHz) 2304 
Model #1 kit: $69.95, 2304 Model #2 kit {with preamp): $79.95,2304 Model" #3 kit 
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HAL-3QOA 7 DIGIT COUNTER WITH FREQUENCY RANGE OF ZERO TO 300 
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HIGHLY STABLE DECODER KIT COMES WITH 2 SIDED, PLATED THRU AND 
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DELUXE 12 BUTTON TQUCHTONE ENCODER KIT utilizing (h* new ICM 7206 
Chip Provides 001 h VISUAL AND AUDIO indications 1 Comes with its own two- 
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Touc*i-Tone pad board, crystal, chip and all necessary components to finish 
the kil 
PRICED AT 129.95 

For Jhose. who wish to mount ihe encoder in a handheld unit ihe PC board 

measures only 9/16" .■ 1 3/4" This partial kH wilh PC board, crystal chip and 

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PRICED AT $14 95 

ACCUKEYER— MEMORY OPTION KIT THIS ACCUKEYER MEMORY KIT PRO 

VIDES A SIMPLE. LOW COST METHOD GF ADDING MEMORY CAPABILITY 
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STANDARD ACCUKEYER BOARD WITH LITTLE DIFFICULTY 1 1 6^5 

ACCUKIYEI |*IT| THIS ACCUKEYER IS A REVISED VERSION OF THE VERY 
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ACCUKEYER— MEMOtY OPTION KIT— TOGETHER ONLY *32 r 0O 

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DON'T BE FOOLED BY PARTIAL KITS WHERE YOU HAVE TO BUY 

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Six digit ALARM CLOCK kit for home, camper. RV, or field-day use. Operates 
on 12 voli AC or DC, and has ils own 60 Hz lime base on the board Complete 
with all electronic components and two-piece. pie-dnMed PC boards Board 
size 4" k 3" Complete wilh speaker and swtlches II operated on DC. there is 
nothing more lo buy,* 

PRICED AT . , , . . . . . 1 1 6.9S 

Tweive^volt AC line cord tor those who wish to operale ihe clock from 110-volt 
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SHIPPING INFORMATION 

ORDERS OVER $2000 WILL BE SHIPPED POSTPAID EXCEPT ON ITEMS 
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[Jf 



HAL 



■mm 






HAROtD C NOWIAND 
W6ZXH 



Hal-Tronix ** 

P.O. BOX 1101 

SOUTH GATE, MICH. 48195 

PHONE (313) 285 1702 



v* Reader Service— see page 146 



73 Magazine * February, 1981 69 



Two Stations on One Antenna 

Impossible? Guess again! 



Charles Trice WA4RRB 
50 N.W. W9 Terrace 
Miami FL 33169 



Phillip V'ttrano WB41NC 
40 N.W. ?89 Terrace 
Miami FL 33169 



diculous to have two com- 
plete antenna systems side- 
by-side. We couldn't both 
operate on the same band 



at the same time, anyway. 
We ended up with a very 
versatile and simple switch- 
ing system that features; (1) 



Can two amateurs live 
next door to each other 
and operate in harmony 
with one antenna system 
for two shacks? Surel Here's 
how we did it. 

At the time I (Charlie 
WA4RR8} moved in next 



^LT 



door to Phil WB4INC P we 
had a few things going for 
us: (1) We had been friends 
for many years- (2) Our 
shacks were to be very 
close. (3) We had a lot of 
parts in the junk box. (4) 
And, most importantly, we 
agreed that it would be i> 

TO 

ANTENNA, OR HQTSft RELAYS 



*2*V 



*_»- 



r 



TO LAMPS 



52 



S* 



X' 



2<V 



t 



Cl 



I 



S.J 



i~ r 



•£4V 

t_ 



|k£ 

RESET RELAY 



Fig, 1. Basic control relay hookup. 



5 



ir 



st 



A 



$2 



A 



^Xr 



S3 



/ff 



1 



54 



1 



-r s* 

■ 1 ■ 



JT 



I 



$« 



— * % 



■> 



TO I DM CONTFtOL BEL At 



TO 15 M CONTROL RELAY 



TO ZOM CONTROL, fif LAY 



TO 40/90 CONTROL RELAY 



TO ROTOR CONTROL ftf LAY 



-> TO CKARUE'S RESET SWITCH LAMP 



Fig. 2. Phil's control panei 



70 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



■» 



I 



TO IOM CONTROL RELAY 



"> 



TO 15 M CONTROL RELAY 



* 



Jl 



ft 



TO 20 M CONTROL RELAY 



Jll 



1 



TO 40^50 CONTROL RELAV 



~> 



JL 



i 



TO fcOTOP CONTROL RELAY 



*T^ 



-* e- 



■^ TO RESET RELAY 



-> TO PHIL'S S6 



/77 



F/g. 3. My control panel. 



two-way intercom between 
shacks; (2) remote control 
of all the separate feedlines 
for a three-band, two-ele- 
ment quad for 10, 15 and 20 
meters; (3) remote control 
of a twoband trap dipole 
for 40 and 80 meters, and (5) 
lighted indicators. 

Since all of the antennas 
already existed at Phil's, we 
left them there and I under- 
took the construction of the 
switching system. The de- 
sign considerations were: (1 ) 
as little disruption to Phil's 
shack as possible; [2) a low 
control voltage between 
shacks; (3) fail-safe normals 
so that power supply failure 
would not inconvenience 
Phil (after all, I was saving 
lots of bucks by not having 
to buy and erect an antenna 
system); (4) a simple single- 
voltage power supply; (5) 
grounding of all antennas 
when not in use r and (6) 
ability to override the other 
shack — if one operator for- 
got to clear his control pan- 
el, the other still could gain 
access to any antenna. 

There are four sections to 
the system: the control re- 
lays, Phil's control panel, 
my control panel, and the 
antenna relays. The basic 
control relay hookup is 



shown in Fig. 1. 

If I press S1 (a momen- 
tary NO SPST push-button 
switch), K1 pulls in. The 
lower set of contacts ap- 
plies a latching ground to 
the relay coil through two 
dependent normals: S2 (an 
NC momentary push-but- 
ton switch) and an NC set of 
contacts on K2. 52 is on 
Phil's control panel and 
when it is pressed, it resets 
the condition that S1 set. K2 
and S3 allow a momentary 
break in the ground used to 
latch K1. I use S3 to reset 
anything I've remoted. Phil 
uses S2 to reset the relay if I 
walk off and leave some- 
thing remoted. 

Point R is connected to 
all of Phil's switches, allow- 
ing reset of any remote con- 
dition to my shack. 

SI and S2 have internal 
lamps that are lighted when 
K1 pulls in. The lights indi- 
cate a remote condition. All 
bulbs are 28 V dc running 
on 24 V dc to lengthen life. 
All control relays are 4PDT 
24 V dc. 

This circuit is duplicated 
five times: four for the an- 
tenna relay control and the 
other for rotor control. 

S6 is a push-on, push-off 
SPST switch with an inter- 



T0: 

ANTENNA 

T0 Z 
CONTROL^ 
RELAY 




TO: PHIL'S 
COAX SWITCH 



TaCHARUE 5 
COAX SWITCH 



Fig. 4. Antenna relays. 

nal lamp. Phil presses S6 
when at the rig, illuminating 
my reset switch lamp (in S3) 
and warning me of Phil's 
operation. I check with Phil 
over the intercom to see 
what antennas are avail- 
able. 

All control switches are 
momentary SPST push-but- 
tons with internal lamps. 

We home-brewed the an- 
tenna relays, not only be- 
cause of the availability of 
parts in the junk box, but al- 
so because of the cost of 
commercial units. The re- 
lays were enclosed in small 
aluminum miniboxes, with 
all coax connections made 
through S0239s, We feared 
an impedance lump, but 
were pleased to find no 



change in the operation of 
any of the antennas. The re- 
lays used were 24 V dc with 
large contacts, capable of 
handling a kilowatt. We al- 
so were pleased that no rf 
got back into the power 
supply. 

The outputs of the anten- 
na relays feed ground-short- 
ing rotary coax switches in 
both shacks. 

All interconnecting ca- 
bles run between the two 
shacks through four-inch 
PVC pipe that is buried 
about six inches down. The 
elbow connections into the 
shacks are hidden from the 
street with bushes and 
ferns. 

We are able to operate si- 
multaneously, even when 
both stations are using the 
quad. The only conflict that 
arises is in the direction the 
quad is pointed. Remem- 
ber—we're friends . . 

The system has been in 
continuous operation for 
over two years, with not 
one failure. I 



ATTENTION MOBILE HAMS 

Vehicles— Aircraft— Marine 

15 METER MOBILE TRANSCEIVER 

CW & USB 

NCG ISSB 




THE QRP RIG WITH THE BIG RIG SOUND ACTIVE 
NOISE BLANKER— RF GAIN-CW SWITCH — 
SQUELCH— MIC GAIN — DIGITAL FREQUENCY 
DISPLAY— Hi/LO POWER SWITCH — 13.8 VDC 5A 
POSITIVE OR N EGATIVE GROUN D. 9.5" x 8.5" x 2.5" 

DEALER INQUIRY INVITED. 





*^3ia 



1275 N. GROVE ST. 

ANAHEIM, CALIF. 92S06 (714) 630-4541 



v* Reader Servtee—see page 146 



73 Magazine * February, 1981 71 



lim iunacek K9YMI 
5145 Xerxes Avenue North 
Minneapolis MN $5430 



Build a 60-Hz Frequency Monitor 

— keep the power company on its toes 



How many times have 
you needed a simple, 
cheap, 60-Hz frequency in- 
dicator? Sure, a commer- 
cial reed-type meter is nice, 
but it never seems to be 
available when you need it 
The other alternative, the 
station frequency counter, 
is bulky and expensive. 

Here is another de- 
vice—a circuit — which can 
resolve cycles per minute 
and costs only a few dollars 
to build. The circuit is basi- 
cally a frequency compara- 
tor, and the idea can be ex- 



•I2V 



tended to almost any fre- 
quency you wish.* Fig. 1 
shows the schematic. The 
reference frequency (60 Hz) 
is derived by using a color- 
TV crystal and an MM5369 
programmed divider [inte- 
grated circuit). Both crystal 
and IC are very reasonably 
priced and useful for many 
digital clock/timer projects 
as well. The input frequen- 
cy is taken from the low- 
voltage secondary of the 
power transformer, The 

'"Circuits 1 /' 73 Magazine, July, 
1977, p. 35. 



01 -G4 




power supply is straightfor- 
ward, using a bridge recti- 
fier and a 5-volt IC regula- 
tor, U6. 

The reference and the in- 
put frequencies are pro- 
cessed by the Schmitt trig- 
ger, U2, and fed to the com- 
parator circuit, U3, U4, and 
U5, U3 provides identical 
pulse shapes to U4. U4 is a 
4-bit counter which counts 
up with one input and down 
with the other, The counter 
contents are decoded by 
U5 and used to light D5 to 
D8, in sequence. The direc- 




•5* 



1 






rh 






4 



. * 



II 



74l!>5 



'SV 



t 






120 



/ff 



Fig. 1. 60-Hz comparator schematic 



tion of the sequence will in- 
dicate whether the input 
frequency is fast or slow. 
For the display, 1 used a 

7-segment readout with a 
defective segment, but four 
standard LE Ds work as well. 

The PC artwork I used is 
shown in Fig. 2, and parts 
placement in Fig, 3. Any 
method of construction 
you find convenient to use 
with ICs is okay. Nothing is 
particularly critical, but 
you may need 0.01 -uF by- 
pass capacitors for the 
7400-series ICs U6 should 
have a small heat sink. 

It's simple to use. Plug it 
in and watch the rotation of 
the LEDs. For the most part, 
the oscillator trimmer 
doesn't really have to be 
adjustable. If you're a pur- 
ist, the oscillator can be set 

to 3-579545 MHz with a 
frequency counter on U1 
pin 7, a buffered output. 

Piug it into your local 
power company, and you 
will see a very slow rota- 
tion, once every five min- 
utes or so, corresponding to 
a frequency difference of 
perhaps four cycles in five 
minutes. Most power com- 
panies rarely hit 60 Hz on a 



72 73 Magaztrte • February, 1981 




IMPROVE YOUR 



LISTENING. ! i 



' i 

< I 
1 ► 
1 ^ 
« ► 

1 ^ 




SCANNER BEAM ' 






Cl 



£T>< 




ggH^' 1 ?^. 






*i* 



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og 



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60 minute cassette 
$5.95 Pius $1.00 snipping 



Fig. 2. PC board la yout 



short-term basis because of 
adjustments needed for de- 
mand, etc., but over the 
long term, all the clocks 
stay on time. This is why the 
rotation will be fast (clock 
wise) at some times while 
slow (counterclockwise) at 



others. On an emergency or 
standby power system, you 
will see quite wide changes 
of frequency with load vari- 
ations. 

That's all there is to it- 
One of these devices is in 
use at a local radio station. 



« DEALER INQUIRY INVITED • 

SEARCHING FOR THE SOUNDS OF TO MO BROW" 

LjROVE /^NTERPRt5E5 InC 



^352 Dept. K 

BRASSTOWN, NORTH CAROLINA 28902 




(Opening the throttle on a 
30kW diesel generator un- 
til the fluorescent lights fire 
is not the best way to set 
engine speed!) Try one for 
Field Day, 



I want to thank Carol 
Stoops and Keith Anderson 
for the photography, and 
Lindsay Mickler for her as- 
sistance in preparing this 
manuscript- ■ 













Fig. J. Component placement 



60-Hz comparator 



»" Reader $ervrce—&ee page 746 



73 Magazine * February, 1981 73 



Fred Bortavita W5QJM 
PO Box 72072 
Capitol Station 
Austin TX 7S711 



Feelin' No Pain 

expedition to Luckenbach 



Permanent residents of 
Luckenbach, Texas, 
whose numbers fluctuate 
between three and five de- 
pending on the time of year 
and which way the wind is 
blowing, took the whole 
thing in stride on that May 
weekend 

And why not? 

On previous weekends. 



for instance, thousands of 
country-and-westem-music 
fans had jammed the tiny 
Texas hilt country commu- 
nity to listen to their heroes. 
Willie Nelson and Wayton 
Jennings, sing the praises of 
Luckenbach ("where ain't 
nobody feelin' no pain") 
and drink beer. 

Other weekends brought 




Tex' N5TX offers a handful of mikes from inside his 
mobile home's main operating and driving location. The 
vehicle served as one of the many operating points during 
the weekend. 



numbers of Bandidos (the 
Texas answer to California's 
Hell's Angels) roaring down 
Luckenbach's main street 
on their motorcycles for 
days of dancing and drink- 
ing beer. 

And, on weekends be- 
tween, there is a constant 
stream of curious tourists, 
carrying cans of beer and 
admiring such well-known 
landmarks as the town's 
lone parking meter, the re- 
cently installed pay tele- 
phone (the only one in 
town), or the bust of the late 
Hondo Crouch, who helped 
rescue Luckenbach from 
becoming a ghost town by 
buying it— lock, stock, bar- 
rel, and egg-delivery route. 

What was so special 
about the arrival on the 
weekend of May 12-13, 
1979, of several dozen 
radio amateurs (with their 
elaborate equipment and 
antennas) for the first DX- 
pedition to Luckenbach^ 
For the locals, not much- 
except for another increase 
in beer sales. Few passersby 
noticed the sounds of CW 
signals drifting over the row 
of faded green outhouses 
across from the combina- 
ation general store and bar. 

But if the regulars were 
being blase about the 



DXpedition, amateurs 
around the world were not 
They were lined up, waiting 
their turn for a contact with 
W5TEX, the Voice of Luck- 
enbach, for the weekend. 
When the pileups cleared 
at noon Sunday, after 
twenty-eight hours of op- 
eration, some 2 f 20O ama- 
teurs had qualifed for spe- 
cial certificates issued for 
the occasion. And some of 
those pileups were so mas- 
sive, operators and loggers 
occasionally had to sum- 
mon help. 

One of those waiting to 
land W5TEX was UA9DO in 
Moscow, who read about 
the DXpedition in a US ham 
radio magazine. That par- 
ticular QSO was the longest 
distance worked during the 
weekend, (One Texas ham 
wondered why the Russian 
apparently was getting bet 
ter and speedier delivery of 
the magazine than were the 
locals.) 

Other DX logged includ- 
ed WA4JHS/MM1 in the 
Mediterranean, SV0AH in 
Greece, YU2RAW in Yugo^ 
siavia, and EA9FE in Africa, 
all on 10 meters. 

And there was the be- 
wildered WB2RLK/VE1 in 
Nova Scotia, who could not 
immediately grasp the de- 
tails of his QSO with Luck* 



74 73 Magazine * February. 1981 



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73 Magazine ■ February, 1981 75 




Larry N5LL handles the 10-meter and 6-meter FM positions 
from a relaxed perch just aft of the tailgate of a vehicle. 



enbach. Dee WB5VWX and 
Floyd WB5PFR found an 
old set of bedsprings, took 
it outside, propped it up, 
loaded a Ten-Tec Argonaut 
into it through a tuner, and 
worked him on 10 meters, 
getting a respectable 5-by-5 
report in return They said 
later that they had to twice 
explain where they were 
and what was happening 
with their antenna; they 
quoted him as saying that 
"since he was working a sta- 
tion in Luekenbach, he 
could believe almost any- 
thing." That QSO netted 
him the only bedspring en- 
dorsement to be awarded 
on a certificate. The anten- 
na was dismantled imme- 
diately afterward. 

The whole event, staged 
by the Bexar County Re- 
peater Organization in San 
Antonio, was timed to coin- 
cide with the annual return 
of the mud daubers — an oc- 
casion rivaled only by the 
return of the swallows to 
Capistrano or the return of 
the turkey vultures to 
Hinckley. Ohio. And the 



mud daubers (pronounced 
"muddobbers" locally) 
winged in promptly at noon 
on Saturday to be greeted 
with cheers (and another 
round of Lone Star beer) 
from the crowd that had 
gathered to mark the event. 

Operations were set up in 
a former cow pasture, adja- 
cent to the main street, 
vehicles were deployed 
around the area, and the 
place soon took on the air 
of Field Day. Stations were 
set up in mobile homes, 
travel-trailers, on the tail- 
gates of pickup trucks, and 
in a nearby building. 

Beams [lent by Wilson 
Electronics Corp,) and long- 
wires were everywhere In 
many instances, the beams 
were cranked by hand. 

Using regular power 
sources instead of emer- 
gency generators, the op- 
erators jumped to their 
tasks just after breakfast on 
Saturday. Sixty-one opera- 
tors and loggers manned 
the various points, with sta- 
tions on all the high-fre- 
quency bands and on 6 and 




"Cherokee" WD5IKW at the key on 15-meter CW, one of 
the most active operating positions in Luekenbach. 



2 meters in the VHF spec- 
trum. Phyllis Dyer WB5ZFA 
put all the other operators 
to shame by handling 291 
out of 582 contacts on 20- 
meter phone during the 
weekend. And therr were 
524 contacts on 40 phone, 
498 on 15 phone, and 205 
on 15 CW. 

The idea for the outing 
came (as a joke) from a re- 
peater organization mem- 
ber to Bob Schneider AI5Q, 
who was the net control sta- 
tion one night 

"Clem WB5VDL said he 
was turning the net back 
over to AI5Q, who was or- 
ganizing a DXpedition to 
Luekenbach," Schneider re- 
called later. "Everyone 
heard it, and the next thing I 
knew, we were getting calls 
from as far away as Corpus 
Christi wanting to know 
about it" 

From there the idea 
caught on and spread. The 
repeater group raised about 
$1,200 through a raffle to 
finance the costs. 

Tentative plans call for 
the San Antonio group to 
mount its next DXpedition 
from deep in the heart of 
Texas — literally. The next 
outing has been scheduled 



for mid-1981 from a cavern 
below the surface of the 
earth — a cool spot on hot 
days. 

Other sites being eyed 
are Terlinqua, Texas, near 
Big Bend National Park in 
far west Texas and the site 
of an annual chili-cooking 
competition, and Lost 
Pines, near Bryan, Texas. 
Legend has it that Lost 
Pines, located in an area of 
the state otherwise devoid 
of pine trees, came from 
seeds planted by the fa- 
mous Johnny Pineseed, a 
descendant of johnny Ap- 
pleseed, who wandered 
that section of east Texas in 
the last century and whose 
exploits are expected to be 
the center of attention any 
day now, according to 
Schneider 

Any chance of a return 
trip to Luekenbach? 

"That's possible, too," 
Schneider said. "They were 
glad to have us and happy 
about the publicity We 
were so tame compared 
with the normal Lueken- 
bach groups that we almost 
weren't noticed We prob- 
ably were the first group in 
three or four years that 
didn't have hair down to 
our shoulders ■ 



76 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



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Private Bag 0060 

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Botswana 



Operating Overseas 

licensing facts for traveling hams 



Early in 1977. after hav- 
ing passed the radio 
amateur examination in 
South Africa, I had to travel 
for my company to the Ger- 
man Federal Republic. In 
South Africa, I could find 
no information readily 
available on how to obtain 
permission to operate in 
other countries. A phone 
call to the DARC (the 
Deutscher Amateur Radio 
Club) amateur radio center, 
the Amateurfunk-Zentrum 
(AFZ) in Baunatal, West 
Germany, brought me all in- 
formation on how to get a 
guest license. 

After returning to South 
Africa, I discussed my ex- 
perience with other hams. It 
became clear to me how 
many of us travel but leave 
our rigs behind and do not 
apply for permission to op- 
erate in the countries visit- 
ed because there is just no 
one who knows who to con- 
tact for such permission. 
Subsequently, I wrote to 



the DARC and got photo- 
stats of all the guest license 
information available at 
that time (early 1978). The 
information supplied by the 
DARC is, of course, intend- 
ed for German radio ama- 
teurs and is based mainly 
on arrangements the Ger- 
man Ministry of Posts has 
made with other foreign 
telecommunication author- 
ities. 

This was used as a basis 
for finding out the condi- 
tions under which foreign 
telecommunication author- 
ities issue licenses to visi- 
tors. When I visited the UK 
and West Germany early 
last year, I was lucky to 
meet the General Manager 
of the Radio Society of 
Great Britain (RSCB) # OM 
Dave Evans, in London, as 
well as the General Manag- 
er of the DARC in Baunatal. 
We discussed problems 
that visiting hams encoun- 
ter, and I was now able to 
help the DARC update its 



guest license file with infor- 
mation from South Africa 
and elsewhere. 

The information con- 
tained in this article has 
been gathered from various 
trips that other hams and I 
have made. Guest licensing 
is in a stage of rapid ad- 
vancement as more hams 
travel and licensing authori 
ties realize the needs and 
benefits — especially in de- 
veloping countries. 

Let's take now a look at 
how various countries grant 
licenses to visitors- 
Reciprocal Agreement 

Countries which base li- 
censing for visitors strictly 
on reciprocal agreements 
only are, for example, 
Austria, Denmark, Great 
Britain, Switzerland, and 
the United States. 
• The United States: Licens- 
ing for visitors is based on 
reciprocal agreements be- 
tween two licensing author- 
ities, in which both parties 



to the agreement state 
which license classes are 
equivalent and are recog- 
nized by each other; 

• Great Britain: The Home 
Office in London is the 
British licensing authority 
dealing with application 
from visitors Between the 
UK and South Africa, a re- 
ciprocal agreement has al- 
ready existed for quite 
some time, However, a 
large number of radio hams 
traveling from South Africa 
to the UK were not born in 
South Africa. There are f for 
example, British passport 
holders who participated in 
the classes of the Johannes- 
burg branch of the South 
African Radio League, as 
well as other non-S.A. na- 
tionals who passed the am- 
ateur radio operators exam* 
ination in South Africa. 

The agreement states 
that each license authority 
will recognize each other's 

exam certificate provided 



78 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



the applicant is a national 
of the country where he 
passed the exam I pointed 
out that this would exclude 
the non-S.A. citizens who 
are permanent residents in 
South Africa. The Home Of- 
fice spokesman indicated 
that new consideration 
would be given to this mat- 
ter, Nobody had realized 
that this wording could be 
discriminating. 

Guest Licensing 

The Ministry of Posts in 
the German Federal Repub- 
lic, along with other Euro- 
pean countries, started in 
the sixties to conclude 
agreements with other 
countries to cater to travel- 
ing German hams and for 
the visitors. The general lib- 
eralization in Germany and 
other countries led to a new 
type of permission to be in- 
troduced. The guest license 
(also called short- term per- 
mit in some countries) is not 
based on a bilateral agree- 
ment anymore but on the 
merits of the individual ap- 
plicant. This eliminates a 
lot of paperwork and poli- 
tics for the administrations 

Any radio ham holding a 
valid amateur license in 
his/her home country can 
apply for such a guest li- 
cense. A basic requirement 
is that the examination 
passed in the home country 
be equal to or of a higher 
level than the class applied 
for in the country to be 
visited. For example, in the 
US the Technician class li- 
cense is similar to the class 
"A" in the German Federal 
Republic, but the Novice 
license is not equivalent to 
the German class "C" be- 
cause of differences of 
depth in the theory and the 
absence of a CW test in the 
"C" license. 

Belgium, France, West 
Germany, and Israel are 
countries which issue guest 
licenses without a recipro- 
cal agreement in force. 

• Australia: A visitor permit 
is issued on application for 
a period of up to 1 2 months 



for a fee of $A12, provided 
the visitor is a bona fide 
tourist and does not intend 
to enter the country to take 
up employment- Radio 
hams arriving from coun- 
tries where a reciprocal 
agreement exists with 
Australia will be given an 
Australian license even if 
they take up employment. 
Arrivals from non-agree- 
ment countries wishing to 
take up employment have 
to sit for the exam, 

+ Swaziland; A visitor per- 
mit is issued on application 
to hams originating from 
ITU-member countries for a 
period of up to 30 days free 
of charge (include an IRC 
for airmail reply). Applica- 
tions for permanent call- 
signs from hams arriving to 
take up employment will be 
considered (through a secu- 
rity check) once they are 
resident. 

Swaziland, a beautiful 
mountain kingdom with a 
wealth of tourist trade 
mainly from South Africa, is 
not super-rare DX, but there 
are many hams who do not 
have a QSL card. 

The Swazi Telecommuni- 
cations Department has 
been acquainted with ama- 
teur radio since its start and 
visitors have always been 
allowed to operate. Appli- 
cants, however, sometimes 
did not have an answer 
after waiting for six months 
and more- When in Mba- 
bane, the capital, I went to 
see Mr, B. Ma nana, the man 
in charge, who explained 
the problem to me. 

There was no application 
form available, and hams 
simply wrote letters indicat- 
ing the period they wanted 
to operate and enclosed 
photostats of their current 
license. If all required infor- 
mation was provided, a per- 
mit was granted Where the 
application was incom- 
plete, it was filed. The basic 
problem was that appli- 
cants did not know what 
they were supposed to do, 

I developed an applica- 
tion form which covered all 



questions to the satisfac- 
tion of the administration, 
and to my knowledge no 
completed application has 
since been unsuccessful. 

^Zimbabwe Rhodesia: 
Short-term permits are 
issued free of charge on ap- 
plication from visiting hams 
originating in countries 
where no reciprocal agree- 
ment exists, provided the 
application is received at 
least six weeks before ar- 
rival in the country. 

• South Africa: The South 
African Telecommunica- 
tions Department bases its 
licensing decisions for 
visitors on reciprocal agree- 
ments only. At the AGM of 
the South African Radio 
League in Durban in 1979, a 
motion was passed unani- 
mously to appoint a com- 
mittee to investigate guest 
licensing for visitors to 
South Africa. 

Reciprocal Licensing vs. 
Guest Licensing 

Reciprocal Licensing. 
This has the advantage that 
US hams are granted the 
same privileges as visitors 
to the US, This is the same, 
of course, in all other coun- 
tries which license strictly 
on a reciprocal system. Re- 
ciprocal agreements place 
a great administrative bur- 
den on the licensing author- 
ities concerned, sometimes 
for the benefit of only a 
very small number of hams. 
The US is a world leader in 
reciprocal agreements, fol- 
lowed by Great Britain This 
effort is very commend- 
able, but not all administra- 
tions are prepared to con- 
clude agreements with 
large numbers of other 
countries. 

Guest Licensing and 
Short-term Permits. This 
takes a lot of the work load 
off the administration, and 
visitors from rare DX coun- 
tries can be considered, 
which is, of course, a lot of 
fun for the hams in the 
country being visited. It 
gives the visitor a better op- 
portunity to meet the locals 



and make friends. It also is 
exciting to hear an A2C sta- 
tion mobile in 3D6, a ZS6 
call portable ZE, or (when I 
was in Germany) an A2CPS/ 
DL/mobile on the air. 
Political differences be- 
tween countries are not 
obstacles anymore, and ap- 
plicants whom an adminis- 
tration might find undesir- 
able can be rejected with- 
out any embarrassment 

Where Does the Informa- 
tion Come From? 

In my travels, I make a 
point of visiting the license 
authorities to obtain appli- 
cation forms, discuss the 
various aspects of guest li- 
censing, and to maintain a 
personal contact. You 
could do the same. 

To provide up-to-date in- 
formation for radio hams, 
each amateur society 
should have a current file 
based on travels by mem- 
bers. Awareness can be cre- 
ated by the editor of the na- 
tional amateur magazine. 
In the South African Radio 
ZS Magazine, I have had 
various articles published 
which have helped hams to 
obtain reciprocal as well as 
guest licenses. 

The cq-DL also has fre- 
quent reports of traveling 
hams who have visited rare 
countries, describing their 
experiences. 

It is not in my scope to 
answer all queries of all US 
hams traveling the world. 
However, hams traveling in 
Southern Africa, including 
Botswana, Rhodesia, 
Bophuthatswana and Tran- 
skei can contact me for ap- 
plication forms and an in- 
formation sheet. Please in- 
clude $1(U5) for postage 
and photostat expenses per 
country. (Any queries 
without 3 IRCs for return air 
postage cannot be con- 
sidered.) A must: Include 
callsign, license class, pro- 
posed date of arrival, and 
period of intended stay 
Please type, or use neat 
handwriting, and allow at 
least b0 days ■ 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 79 




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80 73 Magazine * February, 1981 




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** Reader Service—see page n© 



73 Magazine * February, 1981 81 



Stalking the Elusive Ground Fault 



a real-life adventure 



A. R Taylor WSOS 
Rte -». Box 76 
Gravette AR 7273b 



Midnight, and after 
four hours, I had 
finally found the semi- 
colon some nearsighted 
copyreader had over- 
looked in my BASIC man- 
ual I pulled the plugs and 
put my toys away. 

Early in the evening, 
there had been flashes of 
lightning in the area, and 
the general forecast was 
for possible thunder-show- 
ers, In this part of the 
Ozarks, that can be bad 
news, so I made the 
rounds. First, the garage, 
where my country-type 
water system was in- 
stalled—check water pres- 
sure and then disconnect 
the pump; throw the 
master switch. Then to the 
radio shack — all gear dis- 
connected from the power 
line, antennas properly 
grounded, everything there 
OK, Back in the house — 
two-meter gear discon- 
nected, organ plug pulled, 
TV antennas and line plug 



out, hi-fi system discorv 
nee ted — nothing running 
there but the electric clock 
built into the wall. 
Refrigerator and deep- 
freeze still connected; pull 
them only when lightning is 
making the dog howl. 
Nothing connected in my 
bedroom but a cheap radio 
and a fluorescent lamp; in 
rny wife's room, I knew 
there was another fluores- 
cent lamp and a clock- 
radio; they should all be 
OK. About twelve-thirty 
now, and it had been a long 
day. Even the dog was 
asleep. 

Two-thirty. 'Bob, I need 
your help!" 

I reckon she did — house 
full of stinking electric- 
type smoke. Wife's fluores- 
cent lamp in flames; elec- 
tric clock dead Bulb in the 
ceiling with a dull glow 
Pulled beds and dressers 
around to get at various 
outlet boxes; nothing 
wrong. (Still not awake*) 
Out in the kitchen, refriger- 
ator not running — oh, boy! 
Those things cost money! 
Utility room, deep-freeze 
not running; they're expen- 
sive, too. Pulled refrigera- 
tor plug. Pulled deep- 



freeze plug — hey! Lights 
came on bright. 

So, problem solved. 
Pretty good for me Back in 
the days when the Kaiser 
was invading Belgium and 
Rickenbacker was learning 
to fly, I used to be able to 
solve little problems like 
this, and I still could, by 
golly! So — must be the 
deep-freeze. Plugged the 
refrigerator back in; lights 
went out. Good grief, re- 
frigerator and deep freeze; 
half a year's social securi- 
ty! 

Plugged in the coffee 
pot; the lights went out. 
Make coffee on the gas. 
Plugged in the toaster; the 
lights went out. The Kaiser 
was getting near Paris by 
this time, and it dawned on 
me that 1 still had a prob- 
lem. {Rickenbacker was 
looking for the Red Baron.) 

Out to the shack for a 
voltmeter, [Hey! It's cold 
out here for a guy my age 
running around in paja- 
mas.) Then to the utility 
box to check circuits. No 
definite conclusion. Let's 
start at the beginning, the 
power pole out in the yard, 
where I had a master cir- 
cuit breaker. 



It's dark; screwdriver to 
get into box; careful, you 
drop that damned screw, 
you'll never find it in the 
grass. Box open, screw in 
bathrobe pocket, volt- 
meter in one hand, probes 
hunting screws on 220-volt 
line, flashlight on probes, 
need light on voltmeter, 
need two more hands; it's 
dark. Got reading— 110 on 
one side, 125 on other side 
of line. So what does that 
tell me that I hadn't al- 
ready guessed? Try to 
shake 75 years out of my 
mind — doesn't shake. 

Replaced cover on cir- 
cuit-breaker box Returned 
to house to drink coffee my 
wife thoughtfully brewed on 
gas range Stopped shiver- 
ing after a while. Let's 
analyze this thing Garage 
and water system com- 
pletely disconnected — 
couldn't be anything 
wrong there. In the shack, 
maybe? Told wife to go 
back to bed. Pulled master 
circuit-breaker in house 
and went out to shack with 
toaster in hand. Plugged in 
toaster, lights got a little 
brighter; plugged toaster in 
on the other line, lights 
went out Ah ha! Trouble in 



82 73 Magazine * February, 1981 



the shack. I knew early in 
the game that it was a 
ground-fault problem I was 
looking for, but how to find 
it in my pajamas at four 
o'clock on a cold morning? 
Better call the power com- 
pany, if our rural phone is 
working. First, though, let's 
be sure. 

Pulled the master switch 
in the shack, went back in 
house, threw that breaker 
back on, and plugged in 
the toaster. The lights went 
out. So it isn't the shack, it 
isn't the house, it can't be 
the garage; what the heck 
was that power company 
number? 

Electric company office 
fifty mites away, but it's an 
"BOO" number. Found it; 
telephone is working. Ring- 
ing Ringing, Ringing, Very 
sleepy voice answering. I 
tell him I have a problem. 
He asks what's wrong. I tell 
him. He says I have a prob- 
lem. 

After a while he wakes 



up, too, finds out where I 
live; and says he will send a 
crew. The last time the 
power company "sent a 
crew," it turned out to be a 
couple of smart young line- 
men who wanted to teach 
"grandpa" how to suck 
eggs, but maybe they've 
got more than one crew. 
Time passed. 1 got dressed. 
Warmer now; stopped 
shivering. 

Lights coming down the 
gravel road. Stopped at my 
driveway- C lory-be, help 
has arrived. This is a dif- 
ferent crew: Didn't believe 
in arguments at five 
o'clock in the morning, 
agreed I had a ground-fault 
problem, noted the ladder 
against the house and com- 
mented that I had already 
checked that connector. 
Told them that I had, but 
suggested they check it 
anyway. Said they would, 
but would "check our stuff 
first/' Restarted their truck 
motor and fired up a pretty 



good searchlight, put on 
spurs, and climbed the 
utility pole. Wiggled the 
connector on our incoming 
ground line and the lights 
in the house flickered! 
Tightened connector and 
told me to try my toaster. 
Tried toaster; it heated and 
lights stayed on. Plugged in 
the refrigerator and the 
angels were singing and so 
was the frig. Tried deep- 
freeze; wife's face fell — no 
new deep-freeze. 

Line crew replaced con- 
nector, also another like it 
on the transformer pole a 
few yards away (sort of 
sleep insurance). 

Greeted the sun with 
coffee all around. Line 
crew told me that they had 
just got into bed after an 
emergency in a town 
across the county when 
they got the call sending 
them to me. Figured now it 
was too late to go home 
and to bed; might as well 
get ready and go to work. 



Wife gets ready and 
leaves for work. I don't 
work (so she tells me). Dig 
into clock radio. Trans- 
former shot. Got one, little 
bit too big, but it will do un- 
til I get a proper replace- 
ment. Installed trans- 
former and clock back in 
business. Hooked it up in 
bedroom, shut off radio, 
wouldn't shut off! Now 
what? Disconnected clock, 
remembered gremlins, re- 
connected clock, switch 
now works. 

Dig into fluorescent 
light. Loading coil a bundle 
of tar with two leads stick- 
ing out, Checked with a 
voltmeter and had conti- 
nuity. Whadayaknow; just 
meited the leads and the 
tar and made a stink, 
Cleaned tar, soldered new 
leads, potted coil in epoxy, 
replaced bulb, light works. 
Still stinks. 

Wife says I'm a genius, 
Don't tell her that I'm not 
smart, just cheap! ■ 



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73 Magazine • February, 1981 83 



Weth Chapin W8Ct 
50? franklin 
Kingstey Ml 49649 



An Operating Console with Class 

— customize to your heart's desire 



Take a look at the W8CI 
operating console in 

Photo A. Total cost of this 



c 



4 



console arrangement was 
$85 It is easy to build, and 

it makes moving of the 



J I 



EITHER- 
— OR 



L 



L SMiL- 



shelf group 



SHELF 



LF \ 



suppsin 



a 



s 




WE 

MOUlTI 

MINES 
ETC 



STH1PS OF AC OUTLETS 



PLASTIC- 



BACK OF SHELF G»Ot# 



SWITCHES 




ON EITHER 
S*0E-^ 













NQ PLASTIC 
OPERATING TABLE TOP HO 

1H* 



60 Itt 
- 60*- 



MAPS ETC. 

* i I ** 

Q □ LZ=» D 



30' 



S3" 



TO AC STAIR 



TOP MOUNTED 
AC OUTLETS 

hiring is 
'hiodgn 




SlsQES IN ABOvE 



equipment and console to 
other places simple, as the 
whole arrangement breaks 
down into lightweight 
pieces, You don't have to 
heave around a heavy desk, 
you can customize it to 
your purposes, it is expand- 
able, and you can remove 
any unit without changing a 
panel or removing screws, 
It takes out all the haywire 
in the shack, puts all your 
operating aids such as maps 
in clear view at all times, 
keeps your Cat I books, pen- 
cils, etc., handy, makes op- 



erating a pleasure, gives 
your equipment a profes- 
sional look, and last but 
certainly not the least, it 
will keep the wife happy. 

This article is not intend- 
ed to be a detailed con- 
struction article. It is only 
an idea article with enough 
details to enable you to cus- 
tomize your own installa- 
tion. Nearly everyone can 
use a few of the ideas to ex- 
pand a present operating 
setup The shelf-group idea 
can be applied to any 
desk— et voiVi— you have a 



MftlERIHL CUTTING 



DRAWER 
FRONT 

AND 
SIDES 



"1." $HEl£ 


V 5HF 1 | 


111 








TablC top 










1 







SHELVES 



QRAWE R 
SOTTO** 


SHELF 
SIDE 


DRAWER 
DIVID- 
ERS 


SHELF 
SIDE 



Wl *Kfi" PLTW0OG 



ALTERfiATE TOP SUPPORT 



TEMPERED MASONUE * X 4 




~^\ 



? 



CROSS SUPPORT FASTENED TO 
E»*DS TO STOP WIGGLE 



h* 



Fig. 1. Suggested layouts and construction details. 



84 73 Magazine * February, 1981 



custom setup with a mini 
mum of work and cost. 

The only tools you need 
are an electric hand saw, 
plane, file, hammer, nails, 
small screws, stain, and 
sandpaper. Material re- 
quired is a 3/4" X 4' x 8' 
piece of plywood, a 4' X 4' 
piece of tempered Mason- 
ite IM , a piece of storm-door 
plastic to fit the top of your 
console, two three-drawer 
unfinished cabinets, 18 feet 
of 1/4" X 1" stripping or 
screen molding, and a strip 
of 110 V ac plugs. All the 
material was purchased at 
our local K-Mart store. You 
can eliminate the three 
drawer cabinets by buying 
a 4' x 4' piece of plywood 
and making your own ends. 

The first step is to decide 
how large you want your 
operating table. I chose 33" 

x 60" because it is wide 
enough and long enough, 
and just fits a standard 30" 

X 60" storm-door plastic 
panel This makes it cheap- 
er, and you do not have to 
cut the plastic. You should 
decide what shelf-group 
you want, and design it with 
the number of shelves you 
want — with the depth, 
width, and height you de- 
sire. Be sure to consider 
possible later expansion. 

The old Crosley Model 52 
and other units are on an L 
shelf that simply sits on a 
support on the side of the 
shelf-group, and the L por- 
tion rests on the operating 
table. You can add as many 
of these L shelves as you 
want by installing another 
small support on the side of 
the shelf-group and adding 
another L shelf that sits on 
top of the first. Details of 
this arrangement are shown 
in Fig, 1, Be sure to leave 
room at the top of the oper- 
ating units for free air circu- 
lation. Notice the shelf- 
group on the right that is 
within easy arm's reach. 
The L shelves are supported 
on one end by a 1-inch 
square X 10-inch support 



glued or bolted onto 
side of the shelves. 



the 



Masonite is used for the 
sides of the shelf-group be- 
cause it is only 1/8-inch 
thick, and thus you can 
mount short-sleeved switch- 
es without any trouble. The 
microphones are mounted 
on one side of the shelf. 
Top-mounted ac outlets are 
positioned on the rear of 
each shelf and are wired 
together, starting at the top 
and ending at the bottom 
with a pigtail plug lead that 
goes to the ac strip on the 
rear of the table. The wiring 
is concealed on the inside 
back of the cabinet. Glue a 
piece of felt on the bottom 
of the shelves, as this will 
stop scratching of the plas- 
tic top and keep it from 
sliding. 

Fig. 1 shows suggested 
layouts and some construc- 
tion details. Also shown is a 
layout that will enable you 
to get all the pieces out of a 
single sheet of plywood and 
one piece of tempered Ma- 
sonite. 

The following are helpful 
hints that resulted from my 
experiences when building 
the console. You can use 
1/4" X 1" stripping or 
screen window trim to put a 
finish on the edge of the 
plywood One side of the 
plywood is fine-finished, 
and all it needs is fine sand- 
ing and a light coat of stain. 
Drill the holes in the plastic 
top along the edges before 
you put it on top of the op- 
erating table, as when the 
drill goes through, you have 
small chips that are unsight- 
ly and raise the plastic. 

Place your operating 
aids, maps, DX prefixes, 
charts, etc., on the table 
and arrange to suit. Be sure 
they are back far enough 
from the edge of the plastic 
top. When you get the final 
arrangement, take small 
pieces of tape and hold 
them in place, because if 
you don't, when the plastic 
top is dropped down the air 




Photo A The W8GI operating console. 



win rush out and disturb 
everything, Mount the ac 
plug strip across the back of 
the table and right up 
against the plastic top, so 
that there is no hole to col- 
lect dirt Don't forget to put 
an extension long enough 



to reach your 110 V ac line 
before you snap the strip 
plugs closed. You will have 
an inch or so of table show- 
ing, but this is unseen. 

Happy console-building. 
It's easy— its fun — it's re- 
warding ■ 



SO ifl'S 




■3 



O TJ *^ -C m ~ - 

5i? &,*§;§ 2 

~ « e ° a? S ™ 

s: & 2 a. as co 

J Hi >* CD -=-* O **- 

^ 9 T, <H ,- „_ *°- 

«0 Sm^" 

o. © o o a. n £n . 

Sz *5£ SS-S c-S 
nO^rtSrt^-* 



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v* Reader Service— see page KG 



73 Magazine * February, 1981 85 



Add-On Capacitance Meter 

works with your counter 



joe Westen haver W4FEC 
155 Woodfield Drive 
Auburn A 1 36830 

This seven-digit capaci- 
tance meter will allow 
you to accurately check the 
capacitance of almost any 
capacitor quicker than you 
can read the printed value. 
It also shows leaky capaci- 
tors and the polarity of 
polarized capacitors. It 
covers 2 pF to 999 uF in only 
two ranges and consumes 
almost no power. All this 
for only $1.28 (2ICs-46t i 1 
diode — 16<f, 5 resistors — 



COUNTER SATE 
(PLN 13 ICM 7206* 

£^ 



25?, 1 DPST switch — 39<F). 

There must be some 
catch — of course, there is. 
You must already own a 
digital frequency counter. 
My tester was built to be 
used in conjunction with a 
homemade seven -digit 
counter using an ICM 
7207/7208 counter chip 
salvaged from a Conar 
model 202 frequency 
counter, but it should work 
equally well with other 
counters. 



Theory 

Ok, let's see 



how it 



works. When a discharged 
capacitor has a fixed volt- 
age applied through a fixed 
series resistance, it will 
charge at a rate directly 
proportional to its capaci- 
tance value. What we will 
measure is the time it takes 
to charge our unknown ca- 
pacitor to some predeter- 
mined value. 

That's where the frequen- 
cy counter comes in. We 
use a flip-flop to obtain a 
pulse whose width is a func- 
tion of the charging time 
and then the counter to 
count how many clock 



CLOCK 
o 



IC2 

I/4 40QI 



OPTIONAL GATE 1CI 
CONNECTION , I/4 400I 

» • 



frf 




CONNECT 

ONLY IF OPTIONAL 

GATE CONNECTION IS USED 




ICI \S4 *00l TO COUNTER INP 

I/4 400* L_Lr ^ (PIN 12 1 



TO COUNTER INPUT 
CM 
06) 



IC| 

1/4 4001 




6 b 






Rl 

-W%r 



R2 



R4 
I2K 



^ **w- 




ICI 

1/4 4001 



* o 



C, 



r 



tea 

1/4 4001 



I C2 

1/4 4001 



n£> 



R3 



I C2 

1/4 4001 



♦ — ^v^ 1 \ *X 4 



Fig. 1. Capacitance checker schematic. 



pulses can pass during the 
time interval of that flip- 
flop pulse. A combination 
of clock frequency, charg- 
ing voltage, series resis- 
tance, and trigger point is 
chosen so that one clock 
pulse passes for each 1 pF 
in the tow range, or one 
clock pulse for each 1000 
pF in the high range. With 
this arrangement, our 
counter gives a direct ca- 
pacitance readout. 

The capacitance mea- 
surement must be syn- 
chronized with the count 
interval of the frequency 
counter. See Fig, 1. Count- 
ing is enabled when pin 13 
of the ICM 7208 is brought 
low (logic 0), Intersil calls 
this the inhibit input pin. 
This function is frequently 
called the gate, and on 
some counters may be a 
logic 1 signal If your count- 
er uses a logic 1 gate, then 
the optional ICI a gate con- 
nection in Fig, 1 can be used 
to invert the gating signal 
Commonly used gate times 
are 0.1 second and 1 sec- 
ond, The gate time interval 
does not affect the capaci- 
tance measurement except 
to limit the maximum value 
of capacitance which can 
be measured. 

When the gate signal 



86 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



goes low, the counter is 
ready to count pulses. IClb 
goes high and starts charg- 
ing the unknown capacitor 
through R1 or R2- The flip- 
flop formed by ICTc and 
ICId was reset to a low out- 
put when the gate was high. 
Now its output changes to 
high after the time delay of 
charging the capacitor up 
to the flip-flop changeover 
point. This time delay is di- 
rectly proportional to the 
capacitance value and is 
the basis of our measure^ 
rnent 

IC2c is initially on while 
the flip-flop output is low 
and will allow clock pulses 
to pass until the Cx time de- 
lay expires and the flip-flop 
goes high. However, IC2d 
blocks the clock pulses 
from the counter until the 
gate goes low and a slight 
time delay imposed by 
IC2a, R3, and lC2b expires. 
This time delay compen- 
sates for the input capaci- 
tance of IClc (about 5 pF) 
and circuit stray capaci- 
tances This allows us to 
measure accurately right 
down to 2 pF. R3 is deter- 
mined experimentally and 
is about the same as R1. If 
errors below 100 pF are of 
no concern, IC2a, IC2b, and 
R3 can be eliminated D1 
allows a quick discharge of 
Cx and can be any small 
switching diode. 

Now, about the clock. 
(Ah, another catch not in- 
cluded in the $1 28!) It must 
be a stable source of pulses 
compatible with CMOS log- 
ic, The frequency doesn't 
matter much, but if it is 
much above 5 MHz, the 
CMOS chips have trouble. 
If it is too low in frequency, 
the ability to measure small 
capacitors become jeopar- 
dised, About 1 MHz seems 
ideal. Stability should be at 
least 1%, so a crystal 
source is best 

Your counter already has 
a crystal oscillator in it 
which can probably be 
used. If it is in the 5-6-MHz 
range, then a divide-by-5 VA 
74C90) will do the job. I 



happened to have a crystal 
marked 1001 kHz and used 
that in a separate oscillator 
(Yi 4001) Almost any crys- 
tal in the 2-10-MHz range 
could be used with an un- 
dertone oscillator 1 So, I'll 
leave the source of the 
clock pulses up to you. 

Calibration 

Now for calibration. This 
instrument has two ranges, 
The low range displays pF 
and the high range pF X 
1000. On the low range, the 
idea is to have one clock 
pulse for each pF. There- 
fore, the time delay for R1 
and Cx needs to be the time 
of one cycle of the clock for 
each pF, On the high range, 
the time delay for R2 and 
Cx needs to be one thou- 
sandth of the time for one 
cycle of the clock for each 
pE 

For example, with a 
1-MHz clock the cycle time 
is 1 us- Therefore, the time 
delay for the low range for 
a 1-pF Cx should be adjust- 
ed with R1 to be 1 us. The 
time delay for the high 
range for a 1000-pF Cx 
should also be adjusted 
with R2 to be 1 us. Thus, 
with a 1-MHz clock, the 
maximum value that can be 
measured with a 0.1-second 
gate is 99,999 pF or about 
0,1 uF With a 1-second 
gate, we can go to 999,999 
pF or 1 uF On the high 
range, we can go to 99 uF 
with a 0.1-second gate and 
999 uF with a 1-second gate. 
On the high range, the error 
caused by the input capaci- 
tance of IC1c is negligible 
and R3 is switched out! The 
values of R1 and R2 depend 
on the clock frequency and 
also the characteristics of 
the particular 4001 chip. 
The chip characteristics 
will vary quite a bit from 
one to another but are 
stable and predictable in 
each chip. 

Calibration obviously re- 
quires some sort of stan- 
dard. I have found capaci- 
tors marked ±10% to be 

far off the printed value. 



+ f5VDC 



Ol DISC 
CEH4HIC 



* 



47M£6 
— wv 



4 



CAPACITOR 
TEST TERMINALS 



SEMICONDUCTOR 
UftDEft TEST 



(VOLT METER 



r 



Fig, 2. Semiconductor junction voltage-variable capaci- 
tance characteristics test setup. 



Also, ±5% capacitors vary 
considerably. The values 
marked on most electrolyt- 
ics are only approxima- 
tions. I have found silver 
mica and disc ceramic ca- 
pacitors which are marked 
±2% to be very close, so I 
use these for calibration. 

With 1000 pF ±2% at 
Cx, I adjust R1 for a counter 
display of 1000 Then I 
crosscheck with a 27-pF 
±2% silver mica and 
bingo — 27! Once calibrat- 
ed on the low range with 
these capacitors, I measure 
a 0.22-uF molded capacitor 
(218752) and select the 
high range and adjust R2 for 
a readout of 219. 

Obviously, the accuracy 
is limited in this calibration 
scheme to the tolerance of 
the best capacitors you can 
find. I think, however, that 
you will find the tester very 
useful and accurate enough 
for anything but laboratory 
work if calibrated to within 
2%. With the particular 
4001 I have in service and 
the 1 001 MHz clock, R1 is 
about 1 04 megohms and 
R2 is about 800 Ohms. Both 
R1 and R2 are fixed, with 
small potentiometers (not 
included in the S1.28!) in 
series for fine adjustment. 
R3 is fixed at 1 megohm. 

When connected to a 
counter, with no capacitor 
under test, this tester will 
always indicate a 1 on the 
last digit R3 is selected so 
that a very small capacitor 
(such as 5 pF) reads correct- 
ly A 1 pF or less then indi- 
cates 1 and anything larger 
will indicate correctly. 

With large capacitors 
there will be a large number 
of digits displayed You 
should ignore all except the 
first three significant digits, 



The rest will change after 
each sampling period, but 
they have no meaning since 
you only calibrated the in- 
strument to 1 or 2%. I have 
never found the reading to 
fluctuate as much as 1%, 
and frequently it fluctuates 
less than .01%. 

Operation 

The power source for 
your tester should be stable 
and can be drawn from 
your counter if it is between 
3 and 15 volts dc Current 
drain is negligible. 

Now that it is all built 
and calibrated, let's look at 
some operating considera- 
tions. Leads from IClc to 
the test jack should be short 
to prevent hum pickup. 
Also, you should keep ex- 
ternal leads to the capaci- 
tor very short and keep 
hands off during sampling 
to keep hum out, Further- 
more, you should mount 
I CI in a socket to make it 
easier to replace after you 
ruin it by not observing a 
few simple precautions. 

Note that the test point 
connects to an input gate of 
the CMOS chip. R4 should 
provide input gate protec- 
tion up to about 120 volts. 
Testing a capacitor in a hot 
circuit can zap the 4001; 
placing a charged capacitor 
to the terminals can zap it, 
too, Large static discharges 
will also spell the end of the 
4001 and you'll be out 23<P 
or so. While these precau- 
tions seem worth mention- 
ing, in over a year of fre- 
quent use I have never 
harmed the 4001 . 

If your counter has a 
01 -second gate, you will 
want to use it most of the 
time. This means the long- 
est you will have to wait for 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 87 



4 



COUNTED 
INPUT 



CONDITIONERS 
PftESCJLER 



OUTPUT 



«ATf 



CAPACITOR 
t ESTER 



CLOCK 





ft! 



Fig. A. Suggested interconnections for capacitance checker, 
counter, and timebase. 



your reading is 1/5 of a sec- 
ond. With a 1-second gate, 
it might take 2 seconds. A 
leaky capacitor will indi- 
cate much too high of a val- 
ue. Just a small amount of 
leakage will cause a little 
disc ceramic to read out 
999 uF. You will not see this 
often, but when you do, 
throw that one away. 



Polarized electrolytic ea 
pacitors usually have leak- 
age when the correct polar- 
ity is not observed. If you 
test one by connecting it to 
the test terminals in both 
directions and get the same 
reading each time, it is 
probably non-polarized. If 
you get considerably differ- 
ent readings, the smaller 



reading is correct and indi- 
cates the correct polarity. 
Of course, the correct way 
to connect electrolytic* is 
the — (minus) to ground 
and the + (plus) to the test 
point. 

Lots of fun can be had 
testing trimmer capacitors, 
crystal holder capaci- 
tances, transistor input/out- 
put capacitances, twisted 
wires, coax, etc. All can be 
easily measured. The volt- 
age-variable capacita net- 
characteristics of semicon- 
ductor junctions can be 
easily observed by using the 
hookup shown in Fig. 3 
Keep all leads as short as 
possible to prevent hum 
pickup. 

I have found that select- 
ed zener diodes exhibit very 
nice large capacitance var- 
actor characteristics up to 
their zener voltage. Select- 
ed silicon transistors with 
their base/collector junc- 
tion reverse biased make 
nice, small-capacitance 



varactors. And, of course, 
you can test a standard var- 
actor to see if it covers the 
desired tuning range for a 
voltage tuning application. 
The best application of all 
is to turn that junk box full 
of poorly marked capaci- 
tors into a supply of useful 
components of known val- 
ues. 

You don't have a fre- 
quency counter? Shame! 
Run right out and buy one, 
or better yet, build one such 
as the $50 Mini-Counter* 
and incorporate this tester 
inside For $1.28 (or so) you 
can't afford not to! A sug- 
gested interconnect block 
diagram with the ICM 
7207/7208 pair is shown in 
Fig. 3M 

References 

1. "Undertones/" Joe Westen- 
haver W4FEC, 73 Magazine, Oc- 
tober. 1980. 

2. "Build this $50 Mint-Counter;* 
Gary McGlellan, 73 Magazine, 
December, 1979. 




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^49 



88 73 Magazine * February, 1981 



Jerry W, Campbell K4ZHM 
Route 4, Box 126 
Nicholasvitte KY 40356 



Better Pilot Lights 

LEDs are the "in" thing 



After having a vfo pilot 
lamp burn out prema- 
turely in my T-599D. I de- 
cided to replace the lamp 
and red lens with an LED. 



BLACK PLASTIC O^AL MOUSING 



CLE** Pi ASTIC 
DIAL C0VEK - 



RED 
LENS 




Referring to Fig. 1(a), the red 
lens is held in place with a 
small amount of cement, 
and is illuminated by a 
lamp positioned close to it 



BLACK PLASTIC DIAL HOUSING 



LED 



INCANDESCENT 
LAMP 



CLEAR PLASTIC 
D(AL COVER 





LEADS CUT 
FROM 
INCANDESCENT 
LAMP 



Fig. 7. (a) Cross-sectional view of Kenwood's vfo pilot light 
system, (b) Cross-sectional view of LED vfo pilot light sys- 
tem. 



The red lens may be re- 
moved easily after cutting 
away the cement. After 
removal of the red lens, the 
hole is slowly enlarged with 
a reamer to the point where 
the LED fits snugly in the 

hole (caution should be ex- 
ercised, as the plastic plate 
is very soft and one easily 
can exceed the desired hole 
diameter). 

Referring to Fig. 1(b), with 
the LED in place, the clear 
plastic dial cover should fit 
properly in the black plastic 
housing. Next, apply some 
cement to the rear of the 



LED and housing to hold 
the LED in place. 

The leads cut from the 
lamp are soldered to the 

LED. It is necessary to insert 
a 1200-Ohm, W-Watt resis- 
tor in series with one of the 
leads to the LED. It is con- 
venient to place the resistor 
on the solder terminal that 
the lamp leads are attached 
to, and in series with either 
lead. 

I found this modification 
to be an improvement, as 
the LEDs are brighter and 
should last much longer. ■ 



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+* Reader S*rvK9—$*e pags 146 



7$ Magazine * February, 1981 89 



Paul Danzer NUl 
2 Dawn Road 

Norwafk CT 06851 



Caution: Solid-State Finals 

learning to live with no-tune radios 



Here you are — your 
brand new Mark XVI 1 1 

Lou denp uter unpacked, 
connected to the power 
supply, and your old tri- 
band beam plugged in. Key 
down; measure the power 
output— only 15 Watts in- 
stead of the rated 100 
Watts, Check the instruc- 
tion manual and notice that 
the power rating holds for a 
50-Ohm load. You have 
been using the beam for 
five years with your old 
Heath or Swan without a 
matchbox so you know the 
antenna is OK Guess you 



will have to send the new 

rig back for repair 

Before you go running 
down to the post office or 
UPS, perhaps you ought to 
take a second look Your 
new rig has solid-state 
finals, and your old rig a 
pair of 6146s. There is a con- 
siderable difference. 

Design Differences 

A typical tube final is 
shown in Fig 1(a). The 
tubes, which are the source 
of rf power, feed an adjust- 
able network which match- 
es the tube output imped- 











AOjimAlU 


M4TCMING 


«*ETW0 






TUflE 

AMPLIFIER 


Mir,* ; 

OUTPUT 




Bf. 




3 
/5 


7 


^wV^Vf'^'V w * 






RF FBOW 


2 
n 


7 


DfHVEfl 













TO 
ANTENNA 



Fig. 1(a). A typical tube final. 











46 C 

m*UT 


r«IECr 
FltTE* 


SOU 
«TT#IJ" 


nW FfKW 


nuns t3 tq* 

UtPliFKt 


9*4 




DRIVE" 













TO 
ANTE*** 



Fig, 1(hl A solid-state rig. 



ance to the load. This load 
is not a 50-Ohm dummy 
load but a real-life antenna 
whose impedance may vary 
drastically with the operat- 
ing frequency and wtth 
weather conditions such as 
wind and temperature, 

The solid-state rig is 
shown in Fig. 1[b). A set of 
transistors feeds a fixed 
bandpass filter. This filter 
changes only as you switch 
bands The key difference 
(and advertised advantage) 
is that no tuning is required, 
Just change bands, dial up 
the operating frequency, 
perhaps peak a preselector, 
and transmit. In fact, ex- 
cept for a desire to see what 
is going on, there is no ap- 
parent need for a collector 
current meter since there is 
no dipping or peaking re- 
quired. 

This basic design differ- 
ence leads to what has been 
called the "A-OK into dum- 
my load" syndrome In the 
example given above, the 
rig probably puts out the 
full rated power when con- 
nected into a dummy load. 
With a practical antenna, 
however, low power, trip- 



ping breakers, or even self- 
destruction of the finals 
may result More insidious 
is the potential for the gen- 
eration of spurious signals 
due to antenna mismatch, 
even though the rig is per- 
fectly clean [and has been 
type-accepted) when con- 
nected to a dummy load. 

Why Does It Happen? 

Solid-state amplifiers are 
designed as broadband am- 
plifiers followed by a band* 
pass filter under the as- 
sumption that a purely 
resistive 50-Ohm load is 
connected to the output. If 
the amplifier is not con- 
nected to an ideal load, i e. p 
the load is not 50 Ohms re- 
sistive or contains reactive 
components, the bandpass 
filter is no longer termi- 
nated in its design condi- 
tions, and it may no longer 
act as the needed filter In 
addition, the filter also is 
designed to be driven by a 
fixed source (the transis- 
tors), and if the transistors 
are operating at a higher or 
lower power level (Fig. 2), 
the filter is again not 
operating under its de- 



&0 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



signed conditions. This 
leads to the remarkable 
situation in which some rigs 
may operate perfectly well 
when tuned up at full 
power but put out spurs if 
you try to operate at low 
power. 

A number of rigs which 
have power-fold back pro- 
tection suffer doubly from 
this effect. When connect- 
ed to a moderate swr load 
(say, 3:1 or higher), the swr is 
sensed, and in order to pro- 
tect the finals, the drive to 
the finals is now decreased. 
This means that the band- 
pass filter is no longer fed 
by transistors operating 
with the design output im- 
pedance and, in addition, 
the filter is connected to a 
load far different from the 
50-Ohm design load. 

What Choice Do You Have? 

Since most if not all of 
the new rigs have solid- 
state finals, we have to live 
with the problem There 



are. however, a number of 
things you can do to put out 
full power, protect your fi- 
nals, and prevent spurs 
from occurring. 

1) You probably will have 
to use an antenna tuner or 
matchbox. The disadvan- 
tage of having more knobs 
to turn is not that serious, 
since you no longer have to 
dip and peak your final. 
Caution; Tuning for mini- 
mum swr or maximum pow- 
er output may not be 
enough You may have to 
build or buy a noise bridge 
and preset the tuner on 
your favorite operating fre- 
quencies. 

2) You may have to op- 
erate the rig near full power 

all the time. Run a test. If 
your swr varies drastically 
as you reduce the drive to 
your rig, you may be put- 
ting out spurs at the lower 
power levels. Similarly, 
don't overdrive it. The cou- 
ple of extra Watts you get 
beyond the manufacturer's 



POWER i 



MANUFACTURERS 
RATING 




100 



^ OUTPUT WPE DANCE 
OF 
50L10 STATE AMPiifltR 



Fig, 2. Impedance change vs. power level. 



ratings may all be out of the 
band, 

3) Be careful in selecting 
a linear amplifier. Untuned 
inputs on grounded-grid lin- 
ears may have been per- 
fectly acceptable with vac- 
uum-tube exciters. How- 
ever, if your solid-state rig 
has power-foldback or 
some other protection and 
the linear does not have a 
50-Ohm input impedance, 
you either might not be 
able to drive the linear to 
full power or you might 
have to use a matchbox be- 
tween the rig and the linear. 

4) Be careful (especially 
on VHP) of mating a rig to 
an amplifier, Tube equip- 



ment was tolerant- Transis- 
tors are not. If your new lit- 
tle handie-talkie does not 
have sufficient protection, 
the finals may vaporize in 
the time it takes the relay in 
the amplifier to switch. Be 
cautious and talk to some- 
one who has seen this com- 
bination working before. 

5) Read and reread the in- 
struction manual If you 
don't understand, or if in- 
formation is not included, 
call the distributor or manu- 
facturer. Users groups can 
be very helpful There is no 
reason for you to guess how 
to use it when there are five 
thousand identical rigs be- 
ing used,! 









ihio is m • 



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¥* Reader Service^see page i 46 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 91 





trbtt 




. . . _ 

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ORBIT is the Official Journal for the 
Radio Amateur Satellite corporation 
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For a FREE SAMPLE COPY please 

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92 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



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Under Software Control 

a repeater control system 
with minimal hardware 



This computer program. 
which runs on a MOS 
Technology KIM-1 micro- 



computer, will replace a 
the control circuitry nor- 
mally required for a small 



A 



Location 

002 D 
004 F 
00B0 
0283 
0284 

02C1 
02C6 
02 D3 



Function 

Length of kerchunk delay 

Setting of time-out timer in minutes 

Setting of ID interval in minutes 

CW speed 

CW tone 

Space for breakers 

Length of courtesy beep 

Length of transmitter tail 



repeater system This sys- 
tem features a smart CW 
ID, a courtesy beep, remote 
control, time-out timer, and 
an ID interval timer, all im- 
plemented without any ex- 
ternal hardware. 

The KIM-1 microcomput- 
er is an ideal system for this 
type of application, with its 



built-in I/O ports and inter- 
val timers; all the necessary 
hardware for undertaking 
this project is provided as 
an assembled and tested 
unit 

When it was decided to 
undertake this project, the 
highest priority was given to 
implementation with a 



Note: Changing the CW speed will affect all timing 
parameters, except the two clocks, in the same 
manner as the speed is changed. 

Table 1, Program timing variables. 



Ltr 


Code 


Ltr 


Code 


Ltr 


Code 


A 


60 


B 


88 


C 


A3 


D 


90 


E 


40 


F 


28 


G 


DO 


H 


08 


I 


20 


J 


78 


K 


80 


L 


48 


M 


E0 


N 


A0 


O 


F0 


P 


68 


Q 


D8 


R 


50 


S 


10 


T 


CO 


U 


30 


V 


18 


W 


70 


X 


98 


Y 


B8 


z 


C8 





FC 


1 


7C 


2 


3C 


3 


1C 


4 


OC 


5 


04 


6 


84 


7 


C4 


8 


E4 


9 


F4 


/ 


94 










Space 


00 








FF 



End of Message 

To program your repeater call, look up each letter 
of call in table above and put code into KIM start- 
ing at 0068; for a space between words, put a 00. 
Remember, at the end of the message, to put an FF 
in memory. 

Table 2. ID code table. 

94 73 Magazine * February, 1981 




INITIALIZE 
CONTROLLER 




mo 



KCnCHDHK 
DELAY 




HE SET 

Ttifm ti 



W*P ID 



-m 



Rx ON 



*E5 





x * 


NO 




5EM& BECP 
tO IF 










■rr-. 



orr, H «,i7 

FOH CARATER 

tn orcp 



Fig. 1. Executive routine flowchart. 




INlTiAUUE 
10 TIME* 




INHULJIE 

i to 





VfS 




YES 




ftE^T ID 

wt = - 
RPT ACTIVE 
FLAG 



£ ftETuftk J 



F/g. 2. Initialization routine flowchart. 



minimum amount of sup- 
port hardware and a max- 
imum amount of work be- 
ing done by the software. 
That goal has been success- 
fully reached here without 
any compromises in the 
performance of this repeat- 
er control system. 



The control system wi 
send the required repeater 
ID in CW. The audio tone 
required is generated inter- 
nally by the microproces- 
sor The repeater system, 
when not active, will ID on- 
ly if the system has been 
keyed within the current ID 
interval; otherwise it will ID 
after the next keying. When 
the repeater is being used, it 
will ID only after the cour- 
tesy beep has been sent, 
minimizing the chance of 
the IDer's audio covering a 
user's transmission through 
the repeater. The ID inter- 
val is currently set at 7 min- 
utes, but the control system 
can be set at from 1 to 60 
minutes in one-minute in- 
tervals. 

If the repeater is timed 
out by a signal staying on 
too long on the input fre- 
quency, when the signal is 
removed, the system will 
immediately [D, informing 
the user that he timed the 
repeater out The time-out 
interval is currently set at 3 
minutes; this can be set at 
from 1 to 60 minutes in one- 
minute intervals. 

Two interrupted riven 
real-time clocks have been 
implemented in software 
using one of the KIM-Vs 

programmable interval 
timers The other program- 



mable interval timer is used 
to generate the required 
audio tones. 

A kerchunk filter has also 
been added which prevents 
the repeater from being 
keyed by a signal on the in- 
put frequency of the re- 
peater for less than one sec- 
ond in duration. This ker- 
chunk filter does not affect 
the operation of the repeat- 
er once it has been activat- 
ed, 

A remote-control feature 
has also been provided for 
in this control system to 
turn the repeater on and off 
when this is necessary. 

The program provided 
here has all of the timing 
parameters set for a very 
pleasing sound on the air. 
Almost every timing param- 
eter in the controller pro- 
gram can be changed very 
easily, however, should you 
desire to change it Table 1 
shows all of the important 
locations that can be 
changed and what effect 
they will have on system 
operation. 

Figs, 1 through 6 are the 
flowcharts for the program 
modules which comprise 
this system. These flow- 
charts, combined with the 
freely-commented program 
listing, should make the un- 
derstanding and modifica- 
tion of this control system 
relatively easy. 

The flowchart for the 
executive routine is shown 
in Fig. 1. The starting loca- 
tion for this routine is at 
0000, and this also is the en- 
try point for activating the 




INITIALISE 

coot 

ftOtfllHf 



itmp 

(.E4DPKG 

S**Ci 



err 

TO 
Sf HO 




TlS 



TRAILING 
5r*CE 



TJHfH 
ftACK Ok 



SHIM 
CHARACTER 



( ffETu»* J 



5EN& 
SPACE 



US 




SEND 

DOT 



SEND 
DASH 



Fig. 3. CW ID routine flowchart 



control system. The execu- 
tive routine is where this 
system spends most of its 
time- It is this routine which 
provides the logic for how 
the repeater will respond to 
an incoming signal. Any 
lines of the program that 
need to be used frequently 
have been coded as subrou- 
tines. The time-out routine 
is located in the executive 
routine, as is the kerchunk 
filter. The executive routine 
and the courtesy- tone rou- 
tine together determine 
when to ID. 

After the executive rou- 
tine, next in memory is the 
code for the CW ID. The ID 
must start at location 0068 
and must not exceed loca- 
tion 007F. Table 2 gives all 
the information needed to 
program your own callsign 
into the system. 

The next subroutine we 



come upon is the receiver 
mask routine, No flowchart 
is provided because of its 
small size and simple cod- 
ing. This is where the sys- 
tem determines if the re- 
peater's receiver is being 
activated. 

The initialization routine, 
a flowchart of which is 
shown in Fig. 2, starts at lo- 
cation 009A, This routine 
handles all of the input and 
output port initialization 
and control of the CW IDer 
There actually are four en- 
try points to this subrou- 
tine; they all are labeled in 
the program listing along 
with their use. 

The subroutine for send* 
ing the CW ID is located 
starting at 0200. The flow- 
chart for this routine is 
shown in Fig. 3. This routine 
is a much-modified version 
of a program published in 



73 Magazine * February. 1981 95 



J4 









0000 


49 00 


Pro 

LDA #t00 


oooe 


6© PA 17 


314 I7FA 


0005 


49 03 


IDA #f03 


0007 


3D FB 17 


3YA 17TB 


0004 


SD FF 17 


3TA 17FF 


MOB 


49 BO 


ISA #$80 


OOOF 


80 FE 17 


MA 17FB 


0012 


49 F4 


LDA #*F4 


0014 


SB OF 17 


3IA 170F 


0017 


20 WL 00 


JSR 009A 


00U 


20 00 02 


JSR 0200 


001D 


20 40 00 


J SB 00 AO 


0020 


20 8F 00 


JSR 008? 


002J 


DO J 


RUE 0023 


0025 


4C 2C 00 


JHF 002C 


0080 


*6 


CLI 


0029 


4C ID 00 


JHP 001D 


0030 


A2 10 


LBI #110 


0022 


20 79 02 


JSR 0279 


0031 


20 8F 00 


JSR ooa? 


00J4 


FO 03 


BEQ 0039 


0036 


40 IB DO 


JKP 001D 


0039 


20 BO 03 


J SB 03B0 


003C 


A9 04 


LDA #$04 


003B 


BD 00 17 


STA 1700 


0041 


20 6F 00 


JSR 0O8 F 


0044 


FO 06 


BEQ 004C 


0046 


20 CO 02 


JSR 0200 


0O49 


4C 31 00 


JKP 0031 


0040 


A5 8D 


IDA OCfiD 


004E 


C9 01 


CKF #103 


OO50 


FO 03 


BBQ 0055 


0052 


4C 41 00 


JHF 0041 


0055 


49 00 


LDA # $00 


0097 


83) 00 17 


STA 1700 


0054 


20 6F 00 


JSR 006? 


MSB 


DO 03 


BUS 0062 


005F 


4C 54 00 


JXP 0O51 


0062 


20 BC 00 


JSR QGBC 


006$ 


AC 13 00 


JMP 0013} 


0066 


90 40 00 


70 90 E4 AB 08 




D E 


W D 8 C H 



Program listing. 



Exscutlva Routine 

LOAD RMI INTERRUPT WfTQS TO 
ADDRESS OF REAL TIME CLOCK 
ROUTINE (0300) 



VECTOR TO 
COHTROL 



LOAD IRQ 
ADDRESS OF REV0CB 
ROUTINE (03#0) 
TURN INTERRTTPT 



008F 


EA 


NOP 


0090 


EA 


NOP 


0091 


EA 


NOP 


0092 


EA 


HOP 


0093 


EA 


HDP 


0094 


AD 02 17 


LDA 170C 


0097 


29 20 


AMD #120 


0O99 


60 


RTS 


009A 


49 00 


LDA #$00 


009C 


65 81 


STA 0061 



TIMER CN 



INITIALISE I/O* UN 
HMD IB ( INITIALISE TORE) 
INITIALIZE I/O 
LOAD ft MASK FOR RI INPUT 

JUMP TO fl TURN OH ROUTINE 
CLEAR INTERRUPT 

INITIALIZE I/O * LOOK AT RI AGAIN 
KERCHUNK DELAY tINITAl TURN OR) 

LOAD ft MASK FOR RK INPUT 

13 SIGNAL STILL PRESENT 

No, IGNORE KERCHUNK 

YES, INITIALIZE 3 MINUTE TIMER 

TURN TI ON 

LOAD ft MASK FOB BX IMFBT 
IS R3E OFF 

TBS, SEND COURTBST TOMS 
GO LOOK FOR REIT SIGNAL 
NO, CHICK J MINUTE TIMER 

IS TIKE OP 

NO, CORTIRUE LOOKING 
YES, flU Oltt BCfffXME 
TURN TRANSMITTER OFT 
WAIT FOR CARRIER TO DROP 



SEND ID AFTER TIMEOLT 

RETURN TO MASTER EXECUTIVE LOOP 

ID C0d« 
08 9* 50 68 CO 00 A6 48 +0 PF 
H/RPT CLE 

Receiver Mask Routine 
SPACE FOR RI BESOURCl IP NEEDED 



LOAD INPUT PORT 
MASK FOR RI INPUT 



Initialisation Routine 
POINT TO INITIALIZE ID TIMER 



0091 
OOAO 
O0A2 
0OA5 
0OA7 
00 AA 
00 AD 
OOAF 
00B1 
0OB3 
00B5 

MM 

00B6 
OOBA 

OOBC 
OOBF 
0001 
O0C3 
00C5 
O0C7 
0009 

0200 
0202 
0205 

0207 
O20A 

020C 

020F 

02U 

0212 

0214 

0216 

0219 

02 IB 

02 IS 

0221 

0222 

0224 

0226 

0226 

022B 

022D 

022F 

0232 

0233 

0235 

0237 

0239 

02 3B 

02 5D 

02 40 

0242 

0245 

0246 

0248 

02 4A 

02 4U 

02 4E 

0250 

0252 



65 82 
A9 WW 
8D 01 17 
A9 00 
8D 00 17 
813 03 17 
A5 82 

09 07 
FO 03 

10 01 
60 

45 @£ 
C9 CO 
BO OD 
20 CO 02 
A9 00 
85 82 
85 SI 
A9 FF 

85 Be 

60 

A9 00 
ED 07 17 
A9 04 
BD 00 17 
42 OC 
BD BF 02 
95 E2 
CA 

10 FB 
A2 03 
20 79 02 
A2 03 
20 79 02 
20 8a 02 
AA 

£6 S2 
C9 60 
DO 03 

4C 19 02 
C* FF 
DO 03 

40 50 02 

8A 

85 DP 

06 DF 

FO £Q 

BO QE 

A2 01 

20 SB 02 

A2 01 

20 79 02 

18 

90 ED 

A2 03 

20 5B 02 

18 

90 FO 

A2 06 

20 79 02 



STA 0062 
LDA /IFF 

STA 1701 
LDA #100 
STA 1700 
STA 1703 
LDA 0082 
CMP #107 
BBQ 00B6 
BPL 0QB6 
ITS 

LDA COBB 
CMP #100 
3NE 0CC9 
JSR 0200 
LDA #100 
STA 0082 
STA 0081 
LDA #IP? 
STA G08B 
RTS 

LDA WOO 
STA 1707 
LDA #104 
STA 1700 
LDX #10C 
LDA 028F V X 
STA 00E2»X 
DKX 

BPL 020c 

LDX 1106 
JSR 0279 
LDI #103 
JSR 0279 
J3R 028 A 
TAX 

LNC 00E2 
CMP #100 
SMS 022B 
JUP 0219 
CMP #1FF 
BNH 0232 
JMP 0250 
TIA 

3T4 OODF 
A3L OODF 
BEQ 0219 
BCS 0248 
LDX #101 
JSR 02 5B 
LDX #$01 
JSR 0279 
CLC 

BOC 0235 
LDX #103 
JSH 025B 

CLC 

BCC 0246 

LDX #106 

JSR 0279 



ENTHT POINT TO INITIALIZE I/O 



ENTRY POINT FOS t$ THE CHECK 
NUMBER OF MINUTES BETWEEN ID'S 



NOV CHECK RPT ACTIVE FLAG 

RO, RETURN 

TES t ID {ENTRY POINT FOR T-0 IU) 

HESET ID TIMER 



RESET RPT ACUTE FLAG 



Code Rout 1 116 
TURN OFF FSAX TIME CLOCK 

TURN TRANSMITTER ON 

INITIALISE CODE ROUTINE 



SEND LSADIKS SPACE 

SPACE BETWEEN LETTERS 

GET CHARACTER TO SEND 

INCREMENT POINTER TO NEXT CHARACTER 
CHECK TO SZE I? CCRRZNT CHAR. 13 SPACE 



CHECK TO SEE IF SND OF KSSSACE 



TEMP STORAGE OP CHARACTER TO SEND 

DONE WITH CHARACTER 
GO SEND DASH 

SEND DOT 

SEND SPACE 

REALLY DO A DASH 



TRAILING SPACE 



the First Book of KtM* This 
program now has the ability 
to take strings of code 
directly from memory and 
send them out as CW and 
the ability to insert spaces 
between words and in- 
dicate the end of the 
message. In addition, the 
portions of this module 
which actually generate the 

*The First Book of KIM, Butter- 
field, Ockers, and Rehnke, 
O.R.B, Argonne IL 60439. 



audio tones have been 
changed to use the pro- 
grammable interval timer 
normally used by the 
KIM-1's cassette I/O rou- 
tine. This change freed up 
the other interval timer 
which can be used to inter- 
rupt-drive another program. 
This timer is then used in 
ihe real-time clock subrou- 
tine. Subroutine calls are 
made frequently to rou- 
tines in this module to han- 
dle various timing delays 



and to generate the cour- 
tesy beep. 

The courtesy- tone rou- 
tine which starts at location 
02C0 is shown in the flow- 
chart in Fig. 4. The length of 
the time allotted for break- 
ers before the courtesy 
beep, the duration of the 
courtesy beep, and the 
length of the repeater's 
transmitter tail are all con- 
trolled in this routine. All 
the timing for these func- 
tions can be changed in this 



routine, if desired. When 
the repeater system is in 
use, this subroutine calls 
theCW ID module. 

The flowchart for the 
real-time clock routine is 
shown in Fig. 5. This routine 
is a continually-running in- 
terrupt-driven clock, driven 
by the MM I interrupt vec- 
tor. This routine is a much- 
modified version of another 
program which appeared in 
the First Book of KIM. This 
real-time clock routine con- 



A 



96 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



QZ55 


A9 


00 




IDA #100 


TURN INTERRUPT 


0257 


3D 


0? 


17 


STA 170? 




0251 


60 






RTS 


RETURN 


02 5B 


66 


ED 




STX OGEE 


MARK SUBROUTINE 


025D 


A5 


£6 




LDA 0O16 




025F 


as 


+7 


17 


STA 17+7 




0262 


A9 


01 




LEA #101 




02S4 


6D 


01 


17 


STA 1701 




0267 


EE 


00 


17 


INC 1700 




026A 


A6 


E7 




LDI 00E7 




026C 


CA 






DEI 




02 60 


no 


FD 




BNE 026C 




026? 


zc 


*7 


17 


BIT 1747 




0?72 


10 


*3 




BPt 0267 




0274 


C6 ED 




DSC OODB 




0276 


DO 


85 




3NB 02 5D 




0256 


€0 






HTS 




0279 


86 ED 




STX OODD 


SPACE SUBRCUTIN] 


027B 


A5 


Efi 




EDA 0OE6 




027E 


HD 


47 


17 


STA 1747 




0280 


2€ 


47 


17 


BIT 1747 




0263 


10 FB 




BPL 0260 




0285 


06 


ED 




DBC OODD 




0267 


DO 


F2 




BNE 027B 




0269 


£0 






RTS 




028A 


A6 


£2 




LDi 00X2 




QSBC 


B5 


68 




LEA 0068,1 




0231 


£0 






RTS 





Cod# ijaltlaliKatioR 
028? 00 05 IB 0} 44 SB CO CO CO CO CO CO 

Court ■■/ Too* Routine 



0200 


A2 10 




LEX 


mo 


SET OP 1 ISCOMD DELAY 


0202 


20 79 


02 


J3R 


0279 




0205 


A2 02 




LDI #102 


SEND TONE 


02C7 


20 5B 02 


J3R 


025B 




02CA 


20 BO 


03 


JSfi 


03BO 


RESET 3 MINUTE TIMER 


02CE 


20 AD 


00 


JSH 


QOAE 


CHECK FOR TIME TO ID 


02DO 


11 




HOP 






02E1 


XA 




WOP 






02D2 


A2 30 




LDI #130 


JET DP REPEATER TAIL 


02P4 


20 79 


02 


JSR 


0279 




02E7 


£0 




RTS 




R#al Tim* Clock Routine 


0300 


46 




FHA 




SAVE THE ENVIRONMENT 


0J01 


8A 




TXA 






0302 


+6 




FHA 






0303 


98 




FYA 






0304 


46 




PHA 






03O5 


A9 83 




LEA 


1*83 




5307 


BE 04 


17 


STA 


1704 




330 A 


2C 07 


17 


BIT 


1707 




330E 


10 PB 




BPL 


030A 




330F 


S6 ao 




IHC 


0000 




3jll 


A9 04 




LEA #104 




>3U 


C5 60 




CMP 


0080 




)315 


DO 41 




BNE 


0358 


ONE SEC ORE NOT UF t EXIT IHTERR1 


>317 


AS 00 




LDA #tOO 


HS3BT ORE SECOND COUNTER 


)J19 


85 60 




STA 0080 





031B 


16 




PLC 




031C 


F8 




3 ED 


SET FOR DECIMAL ARITHMETIC 


0J1D 


A5 


81 


LDA 0081 




031F 


69 


01 


ADC #101 


INCREMENT SECONDS COUNTER 


0321 


85 


81 


STA 0061 




0323 


09 


£0 


CMP #160 


INCREMENT MINUTES? 


0325 


DO 


13 


3NE 03 3 A 


NO, SERVICE 3 MINUTE TIMER 


0J27 


A9 


00 


LDA #iOO 


YBS, RESET SECONDS COUNTER 


0329 


85 


81 


STA 0061 




032B 


A5 


82 


LEA 0062 




032D 


18 




exc 




0321 


69 


01 


ADC #101 


INCREMENT MINUTES COUNTER 


0330 
0332 


85 82 


STA 0082 
CMP #160 




eg 


ou 


RESET MINUTES COUNTER? 


0334 


DO U4 


BNE 033A 


N0« SERVICE 3 MINUTE TIMER 


OJ36 


A9 


00 


LDA #$CC 


TES, RESET MINUTES COUNTER 


0338 


85 82 


3TA 0082 




033A 


A5 


8C 


LDA 008C 


3 mjBJTE T1MKH 


033C 


16 




CLC 




033D 


69 ui 


ADC #101 


INCREMENT SECONDS COUNTER 


0*3F 


85 8C 


STA 008C 




03U 

f\ ^ A i* 


C9 


60 


CMP #160 


INCREMENT MINUTES? 


0343 


DO J.J 


BNE 0356 


1*0 1 EOT INTERRUPT 


0345 


A9 


00 


LEA #100 


TES, RESET SECONDS 


0347 


85 


&C 


STA 008C 




0349 


AS 8D 


LDA 00631 




0J4B 


16 


M 


CLC 




034C 


69 


01 


ADC #101 


INCREMENT MINUTES COUNTER 


034E 


85 


6D 


at a 008D 




0350 


C9 


60 


CMP #160 


RESET MINUTES? 


0352 


DO 
At 


04 
00 


BNE 0158 

LDA #100 


NO, EXIT INTERRUPT 


0154 


RWFT JMFt'Tlftf QOtTTER 


0356 


85 


6D 


STA 008D 




0358 


S& 




CLE 




OJ59 


A9 


F4 


LDA #IP4 


TURN INTERRUPT TIMER BACE ON 


035B 


6D 

>■ a 


OF 17 


STA 170F 




035B 


6r 




PLA 


RESTORE THE ENVIRONMENT 


015F 


A6 




TAT 




0380 


68 




FLA 




0361 


AA 




TAX 




0362 


£6 




PLA 




0363 


40 




RTI 


Remote Contra! Routine 


0380 


AD 


02 17 


LEA 1702 


CHECK FOR TURN ON COMMAND 


0383 


29 


01 


AND #101 


GROUND PBJ0 TO TURN RPT ON 


0385 


FO 03 


BEQ 038A 


JMP TURN ON 


0387 


4C 


8E 03 


JMP 038E 


NO, JUMP SHUTDOWN 


03BA 


58 




CLI 


TURN ON, CLEAR INTERRUPT 


036B 


40 


00 00 


JMP 0000 


KEStART PROGRAM 


038E 


A9 


00 


LDA #100 


SHUTDOWN, TURN TX OFF 


0390 


BE 


00 17 


STA 1700 




0393 


58 




cxa 


CLEAR INTERRUPT 


0394 


4C 


94 03 


JMP 0394 


SHUTDOWN LOOP 

1 Minute Timer Reset Routine 


03BO 


A9 


DO 


LDA #100 




03B2 


85 ec 


STA 008C 


RESET SECONDS 


03B4 


85 1 


3D 


STA 006E 


RESET MINUTES 


03B6 


85 1 


31 


STA 006E 


SET RPT ACTIVE FLAG 


0JR8 


£0 




RTS 





tains two independently 
running real-time clocks, 
each of which is capable of 
keeping time from sec- 
onds to 1 hour and then re- 
setting. These two timers 
comprise the ID interval 
timer and the time-out 
timer. 

Immediately following 
the real-time clock routine 
is the remote-control rou- 
tine. The flowchart for this 
routine is shown in Fig. 6. 
This routine is entered after 



the computer receives a re- 
quest for an interrupt from 
the IRQ interrupt line on 
the KIM-1. To take the re- 
peater off the air, all you 
need to do is to have your 
remote control circuitry 
give a logic pulse to the 
IRQ line The remote-con- 
trol routine will then put 
the program in a tight loop, 
not allowing the repeater to 
be activated. To turn the re- 
peater back on, your con- 
trol circuitry must apply a 



logic to P BO Of the KIM 
and a logic pulse to the 
IRQ interrupt line, The corv 
trol system will then exit the 
tight loop and restart the 
control program The re- 
peater will immediately 
come on the air with the 
CW ID, This routine might 
seem overly simple to 
some, but it gets the job 
done quite nicely. 

The last subroutine is the 
three minute time-reset 
routine. This routine has not 



been flowcharted because 
of its simplicity. The only 
function of this routine is to 
reset the three-minute timer 
upon initial repeater key-up 
and after the courtesy 
beep. 

If you look at the pro- 
gram listing, you will notice 
that all of page 1 in the 
KIM-1 memory is empty. At 
present, this area is avail- 
able entirely to the stack. 
All of this space is not need- 
ed for the stack, and the 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 97 Js. 




Hex dump. 



0000 


A9 


00 8B FA 17 


A9 03 SB FB 17 BD 7F 17 A9 


BO BD 


0010 


?1 


17 A9 P4 


8D OF 17 20 9A 00 20 00 02 20 


AO 00 


0020 


20 6F 00 DO 


03 


4C 20 00 56 


4C 


ID 00 A2 10 


20 79 


0OJ0 


n 


20 BF 00 


FO 


03 40 ID 


00 20 BO 03 A9 04 


BD 00 


0040 


17 20 BF 00 


FO 


06 20 CO 


02 


40 


31 00 A5 SB 09 03 


0050 


FO 


03 4C 41 


00 


At 00 8D 00 


17 


20 BF 00 DO 03 4C 


0060 


5A 


00 20 BC 


00 


4C ID 00 










oofio 
















1A 


0O9O 


SA 


SA SA EA 


JD 


02 17 29 


20 


60 


A9 00 85 Bl 


35 82 


OOAQ 


A9 


FF &D 01 


17 


A9 00 6D 


00 


17 


SB 03 17 A5 


62 C9 


OOBO 


07 


PO 03 10 


01 


60 A5 8E C9 


00 


DO OD 20 00 


02 A9 


0000 


00 85 S2 85 


81 


A9 FF 85 


6E 


60 






0200 


A9 


00 6D 07 


17 


A9 04 8D 


00 


17 


A2 CO HD 8F 02 95 


0210 


E2 


dA 10 FB 


A2 


08 20 79 


02 


A2 


03 20 79 02 


20 8A 


0220 


02 


AA S6 E2 


09 


60 DO 03 


40 


19 


02 09 FF DO 03 4C 


0230 


50 


02 04 S5 


3>F 


06 DF FO 


£0 


BO 


OD A2 01 20 


5B 02 


0240 


42 


01 20 79 


02 


18 90 ID 


A2 


03 


20 5B 02 18 


90 FO 


0850 


A2 


06 20 79 


02 


A9 00 8D Of 1 7 


60 86 DD A5 


£6 SD 


0260 


47 


17 A9 01 m 


01 17 BE 00 17 


A6 S7 CA DO 


FD 2C 


0270 


47 


17 10 F3 C6 DD DO Z5 


60 


86 


DD A5 26 6D 


47 17 


0280 


2C 


47 17 10 FE C6 DD DO 


F2 


60 A6 E2 35 66 


60 00 


0290 


05 


IB 03 44 


:-:- 


CO CO CO CO CO 00 




02C0 


A2 


10 20 79 02 12 02 20 


5B 02 


20 BO 03 20 


AD 00 


OZDO 


SA 


SA A2 30 20 79 02 60 










0300 


46 6a 4fl 9S 


4B A9 63 8D 


04 


17 


ZC 07 17 10 


FB E6 


0310 


60 A9 04 05 


60 DO 41 A9 


00 85 


BO 18 Ffi A5 


61 69 


0320 


01 


8S 81 09 


60 


DO 13 A9 


00 85 


81 A5 82 18 


69 01 


0330 


65 


S2 09 60 


DO 


04 A9 00 


65 


82 


A5 80 18 6$ 


01 85 


0340 


8a 


09 60 DO 13 


AB 00 65 


BC 


A5 


8li IB 69 01 


8-5 8D 


0350 


09 


60 DO 04 


A9 


00 85 OD 


DB 


A9 


F4 BE OF 17 


58 AB 


0360 


66 


AA 68 40 














036 


AD 


02 17 29 


01 


FO 03 40 


Be 


03 


58 40 00 00 


A9 Ofl 


0390 


SD GO 17 5& 


4C 


94 03 










03BO 


A9 


00 85 Be 85 8D 65 &E 


60 









lower portion of page 1 is 
available for future expan- 
sion. 

In order to use this con- 
trol system in your repeat- 
er, a word is in order about 



connecting to the KIM-1 
and interfacing into the re- 
ceiver and transmitter. 
First, the NMI interrupt line 






SE1 UP 
i 91tO*D 
ML** 












S7, m * 






1 ' 






1 

RE4C' 

TiW OUT 

time* 












ntPfAim 




Fig 4. Cou 

flowchart, 




)e routine 


\rtesy-tor 




MVE 

ENVIRONMENT 



CtHJNT 
IM SEC 



c 



ItETufch 








DECIMAL 
NODE 



'NCPrEMtNi 
SECONDS 




*ES 



«!♦« ■ ¥lN* I 



(pin 6, KIM-1 expansion 
connector) should be con- 
nected to PB7 (pin 15, 
KIM-1 application connec- 
tor) This will allow the real- 
time clocks to function. 

Next, PAG (pin 14, KIM-1 
application connector) 
should be connected to the 
repeater's transmit audio, 
as this line will have the CW 
tones on it. The next line 
that you need to hook up is 
the transmitter keying line. 
This line is PA2 (pin 3, KIM- 
1 application connector) 
This line provides a logic 1 
when the transmitter is sup- 
posed to be on. You will 
have to interface this to 
turn your transmitter on 

This connection cannot 
be a direct one as a KIM-1 
I/O pin will sink only about 
1 mA of current. In the re- 
peater I used to develop 
this controller, my transmit- 
ter was solid state and drew 
1 5 mA to ground to key the 
transmitter. A buffer IC was 
connected to PA2 and this 
was sufficient to sink the 15 
mA directly Depending on 
the type of transmitter you 
are using, you may need to 
have a buffer IC drive a 
transistor or even a buffer 
IC to drive a transistor and 
have the transistor drive a 
relay to operate your trans- 
mitter. 

Next, you need to con- 
nect a COR output from 
your repeater's receiver to 
PBS (pin 16, KIM-1 applica- 
tion connector). Your COR 
output must be a logic 
when receiving a signal. 
When the receiver is 
squelched, the voltage on 
the COR output line going 
to the computer should be 




VES 



MIN'O 



*EC- 

SEC + 1 




fES 



yiM'UHW «-■ 




TES 



«m = o 



Fig. 5, Real-time clock routine flowchart. 

jS 98 73 Magazine ■ February, 1981 



less than 5.5 V to prevent 
possible damage to the 
computer. In my system, us- 
ing a transistorized receiv- 
er, I hooked up a COS (car- 
rier-operated switch) to the 
receiver and connected 
that transistor directly to 
PBS. In order for this system 
to work, the grounds of this 
controller, any interface cir- 
cuitry, the receiver, and the 
transmitter should be con- 
nected together — no float 
ing grounds are allowed. 
Also, the power line to the 
computer should be as well 
filtered as possible. 

If you are using the re- 
moter on trol portion of this 
control system, then you 
also must connect PBO (pin 
9, KIM-1 application con- 
nector) and IRQ (pin 4, 
KIM-1 expansion con- 
nector) to the appropriate 
points of your control cir- 
cuitry. The last thing you 
need to do before putting 
this system on the air is to 
put a CW ID into the con- 
troller. This is explained in 
Table 2 and you can use the 
example in the program list- 
ing for DE WD8CHH/RPT 
CLE as further help. 

This control system has 
been exhaustively tested 
and all of the bugs should 
be out by now. However, if 
you have a problem, con- 
tact me and I will provide 
whatever assistance I 
can ■ 



5 T ■ ) 




GLEAfi 
(hJTtRfiuPT 



FiSTART 



) 



CLE** 
l«TEfi* 



T1GI-' 



Fig* 6. Remote-control rou 
tine flowchart. 



NEW WIRE-WRAPPING TOOL DOES ALL 
The new WSTJ-30M "Hobby Wrap" tool performs the complete wire wrapping 
function. First, the tool wraps 30 AWG(0^6mm) wire onto standard 026 inch 
(06mm) square DIP Socket Posts. In addition, the tool also unwraps and, 

finally, it strips 30 AWQ wire nick-free. 
WSU^SOM makes a "modified" style of wrap, in which approximately 1 J turns A 
ofinsulated wire are wrapped Ln addition to the bare wire for purposes of added M 
mechanical stability Designed for the serious amateur, the WSU-30M features J ^ 

compact, all metal construction for years of dependable service. 
This unique tool is remarkable value performing the work of three separate A 

tools at a fraction of the cost. M 



WSU-30M 



PART No 

WSU-30M 



/A 



if 



III II 



REGULAR 



PART No. 

WSU-30 



Unwrap 



Wrap 



WIRE WRAPPING -STRIPPING UNWRAPPING TOOL 
The compact, inexpensive WSU-30 "Hobby Wrap*" Tool does the job of three 
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* £% ^V^J% with 30 AWGfOjaSmm) wire on standard 025 inch ( 0.6mm ) DIP Socket Posts. 
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r ^^ *^ ^"^ solder 



^ OK Machine & Tool Corporation 

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'Minimum billings $25 00. add shipping charge 52.00 
New York State residents add applicable tax 



*** Beatfer Servfce— see page 146 



73 Magazine * February, 1981 99 



a 



Mark Oman WAQRBR 

528 Demes €t 

ft. Colifos CO 80525 



The Fun-Mitter 
A Goof-Proof Rf Project 

fail-safe QRP rig uses Radio Shack parts 



The purpose of this proj- 
ect was to build a sim- 
ple transmitter that could 
be duplicated easily by any 
amateur. 

My main interest as an 
amateur lies in designing 
and building my own equip- 
ment. During numerous on* 
the-air conversations, I dis- 
covered that home-brewing 
is not a forgotten art and 



! IQK 



19 
I 

fft /tf 



001 



that many hams are still in- 
terested in building at least 
some piece of equipment 
for use in the shack. How- 
ever, it seems that a good 
portion of newcomers (and 
not~sr>newcomers) are frus- 
trated when trying to find a 
project that is simple 
enough to understand, is 
cheap, and will produce a 
useful item which is not 









I 1 ' 



i — r&i" 



T( 



i 1 



■CJPT 



ffl 



RZ 
4,7 K 



ONLY ON 

flOm 



I 

H t 

JlL 



hp* — *r*i 



m 



'! R4 

> AT 



fte 

3.3 



m 



HJ 
220 



(<[>J4 



€5 



C€ 



time-consuming to build, 

debug, and get operational. 
This 5- Watt 80/40-meter, 
CW transmitter is all of this 
and more. All of the parts 
can be purchased at your 
local Radio Shack, assem- 
bly time is less than an 
hour, and tune-up time is 
zero. Using a PC board 
practically guarantees that 
the transmitter wil work 



ANT 



fft 




I 



Ci 



TO 
RCVff 



03 



^C2 

J 00 



m 



ftf 



lis. 3 



Fig. 1. Transmitter schematic. 



the first time the key is 

closed. These features 
should make this a project 
that both the Novice and 
old-timer can enjoy. 

My original design called 
for vfo control of the trans- 
mitter, but that required 
five rather than three tran- 
sistors, Additionally and 
more importantly, the com- 
ponents needed to con- 
struct a stable vfo cannot 
be purchased at most Radio 
Shack outlets To overcome 
these problems, crystal 
control was decided upon, 
At first thought, crystals 
conjure up an image of 
hours of operating without 
a contact as you wait for 
someone to happen upon 
your frequency. That sim- 
ply isn't the case, as will be 
shown later. Also, since 
Novices now can use vfos, 
there are many crystals ly- 
ing around in ham shacks 
everywhere. 

The transmitter can be 
built as a basic unit or with 



100 T3 Magazine • February, 1981 



several options, as shown. 
The basic unit consists of 
the loaded PC board sol- 
dered to an antenna con- 
nector and power source. If 
the transmitter is to be used 
for serious operation — 
which it definitely is 
capable of — then the op- 
tions, which require only a 
little more time and money, 
should be added. Options 
will allow T-R switching, 
some frequency variation, 
two bands in one box r and a 
package that is more pleas- 
ant to look at and show off. 

The Circuit 

As can be seen from Fig, 
1, the transmitter meets the 
design goal of being simple. 
Only three transistors are 
used to generate the 5 
Watts of output power. 
Resonant circuit inductors 
are formed using iron-core 
rf chokes Common-value 
ceramic capacitors are 
used either singly or in par- 
allel to obtain the needed 
capacitance. 

Q1 operates as a Pierce 
oscillator at the crystal fre- 
quency. FT-243 crystals, 
which are inexpensive and 
plentiful, can be used. Out- 
put is taken from Q1 by a 
five-turn link over LI. Q2 
and Q3 comprise the class 
C final amplifier and are op- 
erated in parallel. Parallel 
operation provides an easy 
method of obtaining the de- 
sired 5- Watt output 

The parallel combination 
of Q2 and Q3 presents 
about a 60-Ohm load to be 
matched to the 50-Ohm an- 
tenna load. This collector 
impedance is determined 
from the formula RL = 
Vcc 2 /2po, where Vcc = 24 V 
and po = 5 Watts. 

The impedance transfor- 
mation is accomplished 
with a pi-network com- 
posed of L4, C4, and C5. 
This network also offers 
harmonic attenuation to 
the signal The transmitter, 
as designed, easily meets 
the FCC regulations for har- 
monic radiation. 





Photo A. Completed transmitter. 







R5 and R6 are used to 
equalize current flow in the 
two transistors. In all of the 
units built thus far, I have 
detected no "hogging" of 
current by either transistor 
Nothing special has been 
done in selecting matched 
transistors. If they run 
equally hot, they are 
matched well enough! Heat 
sinks are needed on both 



Photo 6; Back view. 

transistors to dissipate the type of heat sink needed is 
heat generated. Since the not available at Radio 




m 



LM-317 



Cl 
SOW 






ISO 



T 

I 



m 



3300 






Fig, 2. Power supply schematic. 



73 Magazine * February, 1981 101 




TO SIB 



TO Yl 



F/g. J, PC board layout foil side, (Single-sided, 
fiberglass, copper-clad board.) 



Shack, they must be con- 
structed by hand. Light 
gauge aluminum can be 
used by forming a tightly 
fitting cap over the transis- 
tor 

The design goal of using 
readily-avatlahle parts was 
realized throughout the rig. 
Radio Shack disc ceramic 
capacitors are used and 
have performed well. Un- 
fortunately, there is a limit- 
ed variety of these parts. To 
obtain the desired capaci- 



tance, the capacitors, 
where necessary, are sol- 
dered in parallel. This al- 
lows for the elimination of 
variable capacitors to 
tweak the tuned circuits to 
resonance. In all units as 
sembled, the resonant cir- 
cuits and matching net- 
works have worked tine 
with no tweaking neces- 
sary. 

To construct 11, remove 
the required number of 
turns from the Radio Shack 



Parts List 
(Radio Shack parts numbers in parentheses.) 

Fig. 1 . 

C1-C10 —Ceramic disc (272-xxx) 

C3 — 80m: 220 pF; 40m: 47 pF 

C4,C5 —80m; 690 pF (220 and 470 pF in parallel); 

—40m; 420 pF (220, 100, and 100 pF in parallel) 
Copt — BC variable, approx. 30-200 pF 
J1.J2 -30-239(278-201) 
J 3 —Phono jack (274-366) 

J 4 —Phono jack (247-252) 

LI —80m; 8.4 uH, 8 turns removed (273-101) 

40m; 10.0 uH, no turns removed (273-101) 
L2 —5 turns wound over side of LI 
L3 —Approx. 30 uH, 40% of turns removed (273-102) 
L4 —80m: 2.4 uH, 16 turns removed (273-101) 

40m; 1.2 uH, 23 turns removed (273-101) 
Q1 -RS-2033 {276-2033) 

02,03 —RS-2038 (276-2038) 

R5,R6 —Each is 3 10 Ohm, V*-W (271-001) in parallel 
SI -DPDT toggle (275-1546) 

Fig. 2. 

Ct -1000 uF, 50 V (272-1047) 

R1,R2 — % A*\N carton (R2 can be made 5k variable 

to provide 3*30- V output) 

S1 -SPST (275-324) 

T1 —24 V 1amp t min. (273-1480 or 273-1512) 

21 — Fulf-wave bridge rectifier, 1.4 A, 100 piv (276-1152) 



T 



C9 * 



13 



LI 



}[2? 



C -Mh. fT^- 



R ! 



ft? 



\ 






R3 



1 

T 



R4 



R6 



C2 



R5 



c -^h- 



oE 

i 

T 

«3 .B J_ 



TO S1A 



k 



L4 



C6 



T 



C4 



TO J4 



Fig, 4. Component locations. 



choke. Use this removed 
wire to form the link wind- 
ing, L2, Wind L2 over the Q1 
side of L1. L3 should be 
made similarly except that 
no link is needed. The 
chokes work surprisingly 
well as resonant circuit in- 
ductors at 3,5 and 7 MHz. 

One departure from the 
norm in this project was the 
use of +24 V for supply 
voltage rather than the 
more common 12 volts. 
This was done for several 
reasons. It is much easier to 
build and get operational a 
24-volt supply than it is the 
additional stages required 
to realize 5-Watts output 
using a 12-V supply. This 
also makes the transmitter 
simpler and cheaper (other 
design goals). 

A schematic for a very 
simple 24- V supply is shown 
in Fig. 2 This supply can be 
made variable or fixed. It 
has performed flawlessly at 
currents up to 15 Amps. 
The regulator contains in- 
ternal short-circuit protec- 
tion and is seif-contained. 

If an ac-operated supply 
is not desired, four 6-V lan- 
tern batteries can be oper- 
ated in series to provide the 
needed 24 volts Many 
hours of transmitter opera- 
tion can be achieved from 
such batteries. Alternative- 



ly, and probably cheaper, 
sixteen D-cells can be sol- 
dered in series for the sup 
ply voltage Obviously, the 
24-volt supply should not 
be a deterrent to building 
the transmitter. It can be 
used for later projects as 
well! 

Construction 

The transmitter is built 
on a 2VV by V PC board 
Assembly time is less than 
one hour due to the small 
number of parts used. A 
number of transmitter 
boards have been con- 
structed and each one has 
worked fine when power 
was applied. 

For best operating com- 
fort, the transmitter PC 
board should be mounted 
in an enclosure — as men- 
tioned earlier. Any size or 
type of enclosure will work 
fine. I used a Radio Shack 
type, which makes for a 
nice-looking and compact 
transmitter 

A crystal socket should 
be mounted on the front 
panel to allow for a change 
of frequency when desired. 
A variable capacitor can be 
mounted near the socket to 
allow for a small amount of 
frequency excursion from 
the crystal frequency. On 
80 meters, about 1 .5 kHz of 
change has been possible. 
On 40 meters, this increases 



102 73 Magazine * February, 1981 



to about 3-5 kHz. The 
amount of frequency excur- 
sion will vary, depending 
mostly upon the crystal 
used 

Switch SI, a miniature 
DPDT toggle type, is used 
to switch the antenna be- 
tween receive and transmit. 
All connections between 
S1, the PC board, and the 
S0239 antenna connectors 
should be made with coax 
RG-174 is preferred, but if it 
is not available, RC-58 will 
work fine. The only other 
additions necessary are a 
phono connector for volt- 
age and a key jack. 

If desired, the 40-meter 
PC board can be mounted 
in the same box as the 
80-meter board to make a 
two-band transmitter. An* 
other toggle switch will be 
needed to switch the two 
boards to the appropriate 
circuit points. 

Operation 

After assembling the PC 
board and the supporting 
parts into a cabinet, the 
transmitter is ready for use. 
Initially, a dummy load 
should be connected to the 
antenna connector. This al- 
lows for testing without 
generating QRM on the air. 
The dummy load can con- 
sist of two 1 0O-Ohm, 2-Watt 
resistors in parallel If a 
VOM (ammeter) is avail- 
able, it might prove advan- 
tageous to hook it in series 
with the plus side of the 
24- V supply. Input power 
can then be calculated. 

After the key is plugged 
in, the supply turned on, 
and the crystal installed, 
switch SI to transmit and 
close the key The VOM 
should read about 350 mA 
of current This indicates an 
input power of approxi- 
mately 8.5 Watts (Pi -EX 
I = 24 x 351 All of the 
transmitters I have built 
have had a minimum effi- 
ciency (Po/Pi) of around 60 
%, This indicates an output 
power of around 5 Watts. 
The input (and output) 







power of your transmitter 
might vary depending upon 
the gain of the transistors 
used. 

An antenna now can be 
hooked to the S0239 an- 
tenna connector. At the 
same time, a short cable 
should be run between the 
receiver-out connector and 
your receiver. 

You are ready now for 
on-the-air contacts. You 
probably will be as sur- 
prised as I was when you 
first use your new little 
powerhouse. Surprisingly, 
my best success has been in 
calling CQ, The response 
ratio has been close to 
50%, Using one crystal on 
80 meters has resulted in 
numerous contacts up to 
1500 miles away with ex- 
cellent reports in both 
strength and quality. The 
antenna used in conjunc- 
tion with the transmitter 
has been a dipole at 20 feet. 

Conclusion 

The transmitter has met 
the objectives I set out to 
achieve. It has been fun to 
design, build, and to use. 
Hopefully, this article will 
encourage you to try to 



Photo G Inside view. 

build some type of home 
brew gear A simple receiv- 
er board can be con- 
structed easily and in- 



cluded with the transmitter. 
Such a receiver is currently 
being designed. Good luck 
in home^brewing! I 




You may be losing up to half the available 
output from your vertical gain antenna 
because of RF spillover. The amazing 
AEA Isopole with unique decoupling 
design, virtually eliminates RF spillover 
and can help you multiply your power 
in all directions on the horizon relative 
to an ideal half-wave dipole, or end-fed 
non-decoupled "gain" antennas. 

CALL TOLL FREE 

(800) 621-5802 



ERICKSON 

COMMUNICATIONS INC 

sts& h Milwaukee ivf 

CHICAGO U 60630 Ji?< 611 SiSi 



master charge 



MS4 



AEA 



Brings you the 
Breakthrough! 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 103 



•^ 




Fro fit 




MAGAZINE 



<W6RLD 



c/±L jL*A<2) 



THE 

MOST 

UP-TO-DATE 

REPEATER 

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updated, over 230 pages of repeater listings are In- 
dexed by location and frequency. More than 50 maps 
pinpoint 2000 repeater locations throughout the USA. 
Foreign listings Include Europe, the Middle East, South 
America and Africa. $4.95. 

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104 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



WHAT WILL YOUR NEW 

RIG BE LIKE? 



The magic of digital elec- 
tronics is coming to ham 
gear , . . and you'll be able to 
read about these develop- 
ments in 73, There probably 
will be more changes in ham 
equipment in the next few 
years than ever before in 
history, You'll see these 
changes coming in 73, where 
youll read about the experi- 
ments and pioneering. 73 has 
more articles than any other 
ham magazine. . often 
more than ail the others 
combined. 

When sideband got start- 
ed it was moved along by 
the many pioneering articles 
in 73. In the 60s it was solid 
state, with several times as 
many articles an the subject 
than in all the other maga- 
zines combined. When re- 
peaters and FM got going 
about ten years ago there 
were over five times as many 
articles on the subject pub- 
lished in 73 as in all other 
ham magazines combined 



. . . and you can see what 
changes that brought to 
hamming- Now we're looking 
at exciting developments 
such as narrow band side- 
band for repeaters , . , which 
might give us six times as 
many repeaters in our pres- 
ent bands. We're looking at 
automatic identification sys- 
tems which may make it pos- 
sible for us to read out the 
call letters of any station 
tuned in . . and even the de- 
velopment of self-tuning re- 
ceivers. 

Will stereo double side- 
band techniques make it 
possible to have up to 30 
times as many stations within 
a given HF band as is now 
possible? Hams will be exper- 
imenting and reporting on 
these developments in 73. 73 
is an encyclopedia of ham- 
ming . . . present and future 
. . and Just a bit of the past 
too. 

Without the endless fillers 
on station activities and club 



news, 73 is able to publish far 
more information. . .valu- 
able information. . .on ham- 
ming and ham equipment. 

You may or may not be a 
pioneer, but you certainly will 
want to keep up with what is 
happening and what the 
new rigs are going to be like. 
And frankly, your support of 
73 is needed to keep this 
type of information coming. 




V®j 



Name. 



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312B6 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 105 



LOOKING WEST 



from page 14 

great deal of time experimenting 
with antenna systems for VHF 
and HF. Bob designed and built 
one of the nation's most exotic 
repeater systems: WD9GOE, lo- 
cated in his hometown of Mar* 
issa, Illinois, some 70 miles out- 
side St, Louis. He also spear- 
headed the now-annual ARCH 
Convention in St Louis and has 
accomplished so much in his 
life that it could fill many 
volumes. 

Bob's book Is covered in the 
Review section of this issue of 
73 Magazine, 

THE VOCOM ANTENNA DEPT. 

Elsewhere in Illinois there ex- 
ists a company that calls itself 
VoCom, and they have a rather 
interesting product. It's a 
5/S-wave gain antenna that co- 
lapses to 8" and is designed to 
be used directly on a hand-held 
fitted with a BNOtype connec- 
tor. I became interested in this 
product after moving to our new 
home, (One thing to mention on 
my new home; While set in a 
beautiful canyon, I actually pur- 
chased a $70,000 "dead spot" 
that came complete with ,S CC & 
Ra*' which prohibit any outside 
antenna structure. Not that the 
latter would be of any distinct 
advantage over what I have in 
the attic, unless I erected a 
tower some 650 feet njgh + 1 knew 
what ! was getting into when I 
bought the place and do not 
regret the move, I bank heavily 
on a remote-base system atop a 
nearby peak to keep in touch 
with the outside world,) 

But now and again it's nice 
Just to chew the fat simplex 
(direct), and my Wilson Mark II Is 
just the ticket at those times. 
With the supplied rubber ducky, 
I found my simplex range to be 
under a mile, I tried a 1 /4-wave 
whip and got another mile out of 
that. In fact, with the Vk-wave, 1 
could be heard through the near- 
by WR6AHM Magic Mountain 
repeater. Barely, I grant you, but 
readable. The Icom 22 and attic- 
mounted, 4-element beam put 
me in solidly, but are not conve- 
nient when one wants to lie in 
bed for a chat. 

Anyhow, through a friend I 



heard about the VoCom anten- 
na and procured one* 1 was very 
skeptical when it arrived. Taking 
it out of its shipping container, I 
found what appeared to be a TV 
rabbit ear antenna rod designed 
tor an early model Sony TV, 
mated through a covered coil to 
a BNC plug. I was not all that im- 
pressed. 

"Oh, well. What the heck. 
Let's give it a try," I said to 
myself. I tried keying up Magic 
with the ducky so that*! would 
have a basis for comparison. As 
usual, there was no way to key 
up Magic with the ducky, Then I 
substituted the VoCom, extend- 
ed it out to its full 47 inches and 
tried again. "You're full quieting, 
Bill. You using the beam?" was 
the first report. I was astounded. 
No way, I thought. I had the sta- 
tion stand by and tried the 
ducky. No luck* Back on the 
VoCom I was DFQ* ''The 
bioomin' thing works!" I thought 
to myself. 

Subsequent QSOs on 146.52 
have proven to me that the man* 
ufacturers performance claims 
are in the ballpark (which is 
something else rare in this age 
of hype and jive). Last night, 
under normal conditions, I com- 
pleted a QSO with a station in 
the Simi Valley some 45 miles 
away. Signals were fair both 
ways. One of these days I'll 
publish a photo of these sur- 
roundings to show the terrain l 
am up against. If this antenna 
will work here, I think I can safe- 
ly say that it will work anywhere. 
The VoCom HT Gain Antenna is 
available for $24.95 from 
VoCom, 65 E. Prospect, Suite 
111, Prospect Heights IL 60070. 
In my opinion, it's worth the ask- 
ing price and then some. 

VOYAGER AND ATV 
DEPARTMENT 

One of the most fascinating 
places in Southern California is 
the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in 
Pasadena. For well over a de- 
cade, JPL has been the scene of 
some of the greatest break- 
throughs in the history of man's 
conquest of the "final frontier." 
Many of us grew up watching 
the epic of American space ex- 
ploration unfold through the 
eyes of news correspondents 




Saturn and its satellites Tethys (outer left), Enceladus (inner left), 
and Mimas (right of rings) are seen in this mosaic of tmages taken by 
NASA 's Voyager 1 on October 30, 198Q, from a distance of 18 million 
kilometers (1 1 million mites). The soft, velvety appearance of the low- 
contrast banded structure and increased reflection of blue light near 
the perimeter of the Saturn disk are due to scattering by a haze layer 
above the planet's cloud deck. Features larger than 350 kilometers 
(220 miles) are visible, The projected width of the rings at the center 
of the disk is 10,000 kilometers (6 t 000 miles), which provides a scale 
for estimating feature sizes on the image. Photo courtesy of NASA. 



and scientists in press confer- 
ences. 

In November of 1980, we wit- 
nessed another chapter in this 
ongoing story as Voyager T had 
a "Close Encounter of a Special 
Kind" with the planet Saturn. 
We saw the close-up photos of 
Saturn, its rings and its moons T 
in a manner never seen before. 
For alt the questions answered 
by the Voyager 1 flyby, new ones 
arose, We watched as Voyager, 
a billion miles off in endless 
space, performed its appointed 
task flawlessly, sending back 
television photos of the ringed 
world. From the comfort of our 
own homes, we watched as peo- 
ple such as NBC's Roy Neai 
brought these pictures to us via 
our own TV set. Together we 
lived through another great mo- 
ment in man's conquest of the 
unknown. 

Among the first to see some 
of these epic photos were those 



of us who are amateur radio op* 
eratora This because there ex- 
ists at JPL one of the nation's 
most active amateur radio 
clubs, an organization well 
known for doing its part to help 
commemorate events such as 
this. In the past, whenever a 
close encounter such as this 
took place, the JPL Amateur 
Radio Club went on the air send- 
ing slow-scan photos and offer- 
ing commemorative QSL cards 
which have become collectors' 
items. The Voyager 1 Saturn 
f lyby was no exception, as those 
of you who QSOed W6VIO {Voy- 
ager in Outerspace) during this 
time period are well aware. For 
the better part of November, 
W6VIO was operational on a 
daily basis. Hot from the J PL Im- 
aging department, photos were 
aired on various amateur bands 
worldwide, using slow-scan 
television techniques. But that 
was not all. For the Voyager 1 



t06 73 Magazine • February, 1981 




One of the visitors to W6VI0 during the Saturn encounter was Mike 
Davis WQ6FFV. Many of you will remember Mike. Two years ago. at 
age 13 t he coordinated the rescue of three people aboard a sinking 
boat in the Caribbean. 



Saturn encounter another di- 
mension was added: regional 
fast-scan television using facili- 
ties provided by Tom (THara 
W60RG of P.C, Electronics and 
the Southern California ATV 
Club. 
The fast-scan installation 

was rather unique. The idea was 
to get the video signals from 
W6VI0 into two area ATV re- 
peaters, one located on John- 
stone Peak near Pomona, Cali- 



fornia, and the other on Mt 
Wilson. As you can see from the 
accompanying pictorial, while 
JPL may He in the shadow of Mt. 
Wilson, it is not l!ne*of-sight to 
it. JPL also is effectively 
blocked from Johnstone Peak 
by other hills. One of the places 
it could see easily, however, was 
the Flintridge area, so a deci- 
sion was made to install an in- 
termediary link at the home of 
Dr. Dale Hauck W6YFT. Televl- 





Those JPL employees operating at W6VIO did so on their own time. 
These two manned the 220-FM position and ate lunch at the same 
time. Talk about dedication! 



sion was then generated at 
W6VIO, relayed to W6YFT and 
into the two erossband ATV re- 
peaters, affording the ever- 
growing ATV community out 
here a chance to see things first 
hand. 

The fast*scan operation was 
every bit as successful as was 
the slow-scan. There were re- 
ports of reception as far away as 
Riverside and San Diego, and It 
was of good quality color 
photos many times accom- 
panied by descriptive audio of 
what was being seen. The fast- 
scan was so well received that 
plans already are being made to 
repeat the setup next summer 
when Voyager 2 encounters the 



ringed planet and scientists 
again try to unravel some of the 
mysteries of space. In the mean- 
time, if you were among those 
fortunate enough to QSO 
W6VIO, I urge you to send for 
one of their QSL cards. Be sure 
you are a "logged contact,*' and 
send your own QSL confirming 
the contact along with a #10 
self-addressed, stamped enve- 
lope to W6VIO at their Caifbook 
address, When you receive 
yours, you might want to frame 
it. Not only to protect it f but so 
that it will stand out among the 
rest as a symbol of your per- 
sonal participation in a rather 
monumental achievement of 
mankind. 




WGTFT 
FLIWTRIOGE 



The stow-scan ATV setup at W6VIO was simple but effective. From 
this position, pictures were seen worldwide. 




W€ORG 
RPT 



JOHNST0KE 

PtAK 

2900 ft MSl 




73 Magazine * February, 1981 107 



CONTESTS 



from page 19 

Work as many GGWA mem- 
bers as possible and apply for 
the several Special QCWA Cer- 
tificates which you have qual- 
ified for in the QCWA Parties- 
Worked 50 States, Worked 60 
Chapters, Worked 100 Mem* 
bers, and Worked 500 Members. 

ARRL INTERNATIONAL 
DX CONTEST ~CW 

0000 GMT February 21 
2400 GMT February 22 

The ARRL-sponsored contest 
is open to all amateurs world- 
wide. Note that the basic con- 
test format has been returned to 
that of 1979, with W/VE stations 
working the world and every- 
body else working W/VE sta* 
tions only. The changes to sin- 
gle-hand categories and the ex- 
panded awards program proved 
very popular and remain un- 
changed. Use all bands. 1.8 to 30 
MHz. 

Operating categories include: 
single operator allband and sin- 
gle*band + multi-operator single 
transmitter or multi-transmitter, 
QRP single transmitteronly with 
10 Watts input or less (5 Watts 
output or less). 

Your calisign must indicate 



your DXCC country (KL7XYZ/2 In 
NJ, FG0AAA/FS on St, Martin, 
etc.). One operator may not use 
more than one calisign from any 
given location during the con- 
test period. The same station 
may be worked only once per 
band. No crossmode, cross- 
band, or repeater contacts. 
Aeronautical and maritime mo- 
bile stations outside the USA and 
Canada may be worked for QSO 
credit only by W/VE stations. All 
transmitters and receivers must 
be located within a 500-meter di- 
ameter circle, excluding direct- 
ly-connected antennas. This 
prohibits the use of remote re- 
ceiving installations. However, 
multi-operator stations may use 
spotting nets for multiplier hunt- 
ing only, 

EXCHANGE: 

W/VE stations (includes 48 
contiguous United States and 
does not include Canadian is- 
lands of St. Paul and Sable) 
send RST and state/province. 
DX stations send RST and trans- 
mitting power as a 3-digit num- 
ber. 

SCORING: 

W/VE stations count 3 points 
per DXQSO. The multiplier is the 



sum of DXCC countries (except 

US and Canada) worked per 
band. DX stations score 3 points 
per W/VE QSO. The multiplier is 
the US states (except KL7 and 
KH6), VE1-7, VO, and VE8/VY1 
worked per band. Maximum of 
57 per band. Final score is total 
QSO points times the total mul- 
tiplier. 

AWARDS: 

Various plaques and certifi- 
cates to top scorers. Certifi- 
cates to each DX entrant mak- 
ing more than 500 QSOs. ARRL 
affiliated clubs compete for 
gavels on three levels: unlim- 
ited, medium, and local clubs. 
Details should have appeared in 
the January, 1981, QST. 

ENTRIES: 

All entrants are encouraged 
to use forms available from 
ARRL (include an SASE or one 
IRC). Logs should indicate times 
in GMT, bands, calls, and ex- 
changes. Multipliers should be 
clearly marked in the log the 
first time worked. Entries with 
more than 500 QSOs must in- 
clude cross-check sheets. All 
operators of multi-operator sta- 
tions must be listed. Entries 
must be postmarked by April 7, 
1961, and addressed to: ARRL, 
225 Main Street, Newington CT 
061 11, Any entries received after 
mid-July may not make OS7" list- 
ings. Usual entry conditions and 
disqualification criteria. 



GQRPCLUB 
CW ACTIVITY WEEKENDS 

0900 GMT February 28 

2300 GMT March 1 
0900 GMT September 12 
2300 GMT September 13 

All amateur radio amateurs 
interested In QRP are Invited to 
take part In the club's activity 
weekends. No special exchange 
information was mentioned in 
the information provided by the 
club, The operating schedule for 
the two weekends is as follows: 

3560 kHz = O90CM0OO, 1700- 
1800, and 2200-2300 GMT 

7030 kHz -1200-1300, 1500- 
1600, and 19OO-2QG0 GMT 

14060 kHz = 1000-1100, 1400- 
1500, and 2100-2200 GMT 

21060/26060= 1100-1200, 
1600-1700, and 2000-2100 GMT 

Reports on the Activity Week- 
ends are welcomed by Chris- 
topher X PageG4BUE. 

In addition to the above, mem- 
bers of the G*QRP*Club have a 
weekly Activity Period on Sun- 
days from 1100-1230 and from 
1400-1530 GMT on the Interna- 
tional QRP frequencies (3560, 
7030, 14060, 21060, and 28060), 
All radio amateurs interested in 
QRP are invited to join in. 

For information regarding 
membership in the G-GRP-Club, 
write: George Dobbs G3RJV, 17 
Aspen Drive, Chelmsley Wood t 
Birmingham, England B37 7QX. 
The club publishes a quarterly 
magazine called SPRAT and 
promotes an extensive awards 
program for QRP achievements. 



HAM HELP 



We are happy to provide Ham 
Help listings free, on a space- 
available basis. We are not hap- 
py when we have to take time 
away from other duties to deci- 
pher cryptic notes scrawled il- 
legibly on dog-eared post cards 
and odd-sized scraps of paper. 
Please type or print {neatly!}, 
double spaced, your request on 
an8V*"x iV sheet of paper and 
use upper- and lowercase letters 
where appropriate. Also, please 
make a "1" look like a "t f " not 
an "f, H which could be an "et" or 
an "eye/* and so on. Hard as ft 
may be to believe, we are not fa- 
miliar with every piece of equip- 
ment manufactured on Earth for 



the last 50 years! Thanks for 
your cooperation. 

I need information on using a 
solid-state oscillator in HBR re- 
ceivers by Ted Crosby, I will 
answer and send postage. 
Thanks. 

Owen Laughlin KA8CXK 

719 Hemphill 

Ypsilanti Ml 48197 

I need a working charger for 
the Motorola HT-220 transceiv- 
er I am a senior citizen ham, so I 
need a low price, please. 

Bob Clark W5BTZ 

8260 Wateka Road 

Richardson TX 75080 



I need a copy of the manual 
tor the Gonset GSB-201— an 
original or photocopy would be 
OK. Ill be happy to pay for all 
costs. 

Steven Bein K6MBP 

3044 Danalda Dr. 

Los Angeles CA 90064 

I have a Hammarlund Super 
Pro receiver, military no. BC-779- 
B. It does not cover 10 or 15 
meters, which I would like to 
have. It has one band marked 
100-200 KC and the other, 
200-400 KC. There was a conver- 
sion kit but the company no 
longer has them. 

If anyone has a conversion kit 
for this receiver or a BC-794-B or 
BC-1004 C t even though it 
doesn't work, and if the price Is 
right, I would like to get It. 

Donald B. Watkins 

428 Oak St. 

Warren AR 71671 



I need a schematic and/or 
manual for a keyboard having 
the following markings: #2815061- 
01 A. Unit has 91 keys and PC 
board has LICON 80-551 57CSM 
on it. It may have been used in a 
UNIVAC system. I will reimburse 
copying cost, will copy and 
return promptly, or purchase 
manual. 

John Zowtiak N7BFX 

750 Little Matterhom Or 

Salt Lake City UT 84107 

Where can I get a replace- 
ment cabinet back for my Halli- 
crafters Model S38-B shortwave 
receiver? Mine was damaged 
and I've been unable to get a 
replacement from Hallicrafters, 
There must be distributors 
somewhere that have some of 
these and would be glad to sell 
them, 

Duerson Prewltt K4ZCD 

129 N. Maysville SL 

Mt Sterling KY 40353 



108 73 Magazine * February, 1981 




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73 Magazine * February, 1981 109 



W2NSD/1 

NEVER SAY DIE 

editorial t>y Wayne Green 



from page 1 1 




The crowding of Tokyo has forced much of the growth to go 
underground. This is a small part of the four-floor shopping complex 
which is involved with the Sunshine Prince hotel, where we stayed. 
There are two McDonalds restaurants in this one compfex! There is 
also an almost infinite number of other restaurants, running from 
snack bars to very posh eateries. Muftitayered underground shop- 
ping malts are growing rapidly in Tokyo. 





This is one of the Golden Arches attached to the hotel. It was a 
handy place to get milk. Not being a big Coke fan, I didn't pursue the 
nickel Coke offer. I did invest in their egg McMuffin for breakfast 
now and then. 




Obviously, eating is an ail-consuming interest for me. Here's a 
typical department store basement with its hundreds of food con- 
cessions. The happy innocents running these booths put out tree 
samples to attract business. They also attract frugal Yankees, who 
are able to make a whole meat out of the samples. 




Hmmm, octopus chips! Welt, much better than cow chips, anyway Here's one of the food displays. The tempura jumbo shrimp are 
. . . and free! $7.50. 



110 73 Magazine * February, 1981 





The subway system is easy to use, though it takes guts to try it the Each station is marked in both Japanese and English, with the sta- 
first time. You get the hang of it quickly, it's clean, fast, and welt tions at the ends of the line indicated so you know which train to 
marked. take, 




Yep, ice cream, too. The sundae prices are a hit high, but not out of 
line with the New York prices at $3 for the big banana split Soft ice 
cream cones are usually around 75$ and are sold ati over the place, 




You like grapes? Here are boxes of grapes. . .absolutely deficious 
grapes. The green ones are $20 a box and the smaller box of purple 
grapes is only $12.50. 




To help dispel the idea that eating In Japan is expensive, here is a 
picture of a musk melon. This is a typical fruit product that i saw in 
dozens of fruit stores and fruit counters in department stores. To 
translate the Yen into dofiars divide by 200, Thus, this melon Is a 
mere $50 in American money. 




'i** r 



In the Akihabara (radio row) section of Tokyo, there are hundreds of 
shops selling radios, parts, hi-fi, computers. . .everything in con- 
sumer electronics, With a bit of shopping, you can knock around 
35% or so off the US prices, so I loaded up with new gadgets from 
Casio and Sharp. That's Sherry looking over the cassette bargains. 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 111 



SOCIAL EVENTS 



Listings in this column are 
provided free of charge on a 
space-available basis, The 
following information should be 
Included in every announce- 
ment: sponsor, event, date, 
time, place, city, state, admis- 
sion charge (if any), features, 
talk -in frequencies, and the 
name of whom to contact for 
further information. Announce- 
ments must be received two 
months prior to the month in 
which the event takes place. 
They should be sent dtrectly to 
Editorial Offices, 73 Magazine, 
Pme Street t Peterborough NH 
03458, Attn: Social Events. 



MIAMI FL 
FEB 7 8 

The 21st annual Tropical 
Hamboree and 1981 ARRL Flor- 
ida State Convention will be 
held on February 7-8, 1981, at 
the Flagler Dog Track, Miami FL 
Registration is $3.00 in advance 
and $4.00 at the door Swap ta- 
bles are an additional $12.00 for 
both days, $7.00 for Saturday 
only; and $6.00 for Sunday only, 
Events will include tech talks 
and forums, over 100 exhibit 
booths, 400 swap tables, ladies' 
programs, group meetings, and 
many awards. There will be free 
overnight RV parking for self- 
contained units at the site (ad- 
vance registration is recom- 
mended). Special gatherings are 
planned for QCWA/OOTC/SOWP 
and DXers. For further informa- 
tion and special hotel rates. 
write Dade Radio Club, PO Box 
350045 Riverside Station, Miami 
FL 331*5. 



MANSFIELD OH 
FEB 15 

The Mansfield midwinter 
hamfest auction will be held on 
February 15 t 1981, at the Rich- 
land County Fairgrounds, Mans- 
field OH. Doors will open to the 
public at 8:00 am. Tickets are 
$1,50 in advance and $2.00 at 
the door Features will include 
prizes, an auction, and a flea 
market, ail in a large heated 
building. Talk-in on 14&34/.94. 
For additional information, ad- 
vance tickets, and/or tables, 
send an SASE to Harrv Frietchen 
K8HF, 120 Homewood Road, 
Mansfield OH 44906, or phone 
(419)-529 2801. 

FAYETTEVILLE WV 
FEB 15 

The Plateau Amateur Radio 
Association will hold Its 3rd an* 
nuai hamfest on Sunday, Febru- 
ary 15, 1981, at the Memorial 
Building, FayettevHIe WV. The 
doors will open at 9:00 am and 
admission is $2.50, with children 
admitted free. Flea market 
tables are $2.00. Activities (all in- 
doors) will include ARRL dis- 
plays, forums, exhibits, door 
prizes, and XYL programs. Hot 
food, refreshments, and free 
parking will be available. Talk-in 
on 146.52 and 146.19/79, For 
more information, contact Bill 
Wilson WA8YTM, 302 Central 
Avenue, Apartment #2, Oak Hill 
WV 25901, or phone (304M69- 
99l0or(304V574-1l76, 

VERO BEACH FL 
FEB 21-22 

The Treasure Coast Hamfest 




1 I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 



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will be held on February 21-22, 
1 981 p at the Vero Beach Commu- 
nity Center Admission is $3.00 
per family, in advance, and $4.00 
at the door. Features will in- 
elude prizes, drawings, and a 
QCWA luncheon. Talk-in on 
146.13/73, 146.52/.52, 146.04/.64, 
and 222.34/223.94. For informa- 
tion, write PO Box 3068, Beach 
Station, Vero Beach FL 32960. 

LIVONIA Ml 
FEB 22 

The Livonia Amateur Radio 
Club will hold its 11th annual 
LARC Swap 'n Shop on Sunday, 
February 22, 1981, from 8:00 am 
to 4:00 pm. at Churchill High 
School, Livonia ML There will be 
plenty of tables available. Other 
features include door prizes, 
refreshments, and free parking. 
Talk- in on 146.52. For further in* 
formation, send an SASBE (4" x 
9") to Neil Coffin WA8GWL T c/o 
Livonia Amateur Radio Club, PO 
Box 2111, Livonia Ml 48150. 

AKRON OH 
FEB 22 
The Cuyahoga Falls Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its 27th an* 
nual electronics equipment 
auction and flea market on Sun- 
day. February 22, 1981, at North 
High School, Akron OH, from 
8:30 am to 4:00 pm. Tickets are 
S2.50 at the door and $2.00 In 
advance. Even though it is sug- 
gested that you bring your own 
tables, some will be available 
for $2.00 each. Featured will be 
refreshments and prizes, in- 
eluding a first prize of a Ken- 
wood TS-130S and two more 
prizes of (com IC-2ATs, There 
will be plenty of room for buyers 
and sellers, Including free park- 
ing. Talk-in on 146.04/,64. For 
more details, write GFARC, PO 
Box 6 t Cuyahoga Falls OH 
44222, or phone K8JSL at 
(216)423-3830. 

LANCASTER PA 
FEB 22 

The Lancaster Hamfest will 
be held on February 22, 1981, at 
the Guernsey Pavilion, located 
at the intersection of Rtes. 30 
and 896, east of Lancaster PA. 
General admission is $3.00, ex- 
cept children and XYLs. Doors 
will open at 8:00 am. All Inside 
spaces are available by advance 
registration only and are $4.00 
each lor an 8-foot space, which 
includes a table. There is a limit 
of 2 non-commercial or 6 com- 
mercial tables; the registration 
deadline is February 13, 1981. 



All vendors must set up between 
6:00 am and 8:00 am on Sunday; 
reservations will not be held 
past 9:00 am without prior ar- 
rangement. Free tailgating will 
be available in a specified area 
outside if weather permits. Food 
will be served at the hamfest. 
Also, there are excellent restau- 
rants and accommodations in 
the area. Call (717>768-8271 for 
motel reservations under Ser- 
com. Talk-in on 146.0U61. For 
more information, write Sercom, 
Inc., PO Box 6082, Rohrerstown 
PA 17603. 

VIENNA VA 
FEB 22 

The Vienna Wireless Society 
will hold its annual WINTER- 
FEST™ on February 22, 1981, at 
the Vienna Community Center, 
Park Street, Vienna VA, The 
event will begin at 8:00 am. 

MARLBORO MA 
FEB 22 

The Algonquin Amateur 
Radio Club will hold Its annual 
indoor ham radio (lea market on 
Sunday, February 22, 1981, at 
the Marlboro Jr High School, off 
Rte. 85 on Thresher Avenue, 
Marlboro MA. Doors will be open 
from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm and 
sellers will be admitted starting 
at 9:00 am. Admission is 504. 
Tables reserved by February 15, 
1981, are $5.00; after that 
date, they are $7.50. Talk-in on 
.52. For more Information or 
reservations, contact Charles 
McCarthy W1BK, 128 Forest 
Avenue, Hudson MA 01749. 

MINONG Wl 
FEB 22 

The Wild Rivers Amateur 
Radio Club will hold a mid-win- 
ter swapfest on Sunday, Febru- 
ary 22, 1981. from 10:00 am to 
3:00 pm at the Minong Village 
Hall T Minong Wl, 45 miles south 
of DulutfrvSuperiof, 90 miles 
north of Eau Claire on Highway 
53, and 135 miles from Minneap- 
olis-St. Paul. Admission is $1.00 
and tables are free. There will be 
a raffle drawing for a scanner. 
Talk-in on ,28/ .88 and .52. For in- 
formation, contact Roger Doehr 
W9DLY, Route 5, Box 452, Hay- 
ward Wl 54843. 

LAPORTE IN 
FEB 22 

The LaPorte Winter Hamfest 
will be held on February 22, 

1981, at the LaPorte Civic Audi- 
torium (main floor), LaPorte IN, 
50 miles southeast of Chicago, 



112 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



Donations are $2.00 in advance 
or $2.50 at the gate. There will be 
plenty of room, good food, and 
tables which are $100 each. 
Tallin on .01/.61 and .52. For 
more information, write LPARC, 
PO Box 30, LaPorte JN 46350. 

GLASGOW KY 
FEB 28 

The Mammoth Cave Amateur 
Radio Club will hold its annual 
Glasgow swapfest on Saturday, 
February 28, 1981, from 8:00 am 
to 5:00 pm CST at the Glasgow 
Flea Market Building, 2 miles 
south of Glasgow on Highway 
31 E. There will be a large heated 
building with plenty of free park- 
ing. Each exhibitor will be pro- 
vided one free space with table 
and chair. Additional spaces are 
available for $3.00 each. The 
building will be open for exhibi- 
tors at 7:00 am CST. There will 
be no forums or meetings— just 
door prizes, free coffee, and a 
large flea market. Admission is 
$2.00. Talk-in on .34^94, For ad- 
ditional Information, contact 
WA4JZO, 121 Adairland Ct. t 
Glasgow KY 42141. 

DAVENPORT IA 
MAR 1 

The Davenport Radio Ama- 
teur Club will hold its tenth an- 
nual hamfest on March 1, 1981, 
from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm at the 
Davenport Masonic Temple, 
Highway 61 (Brady Street) and 
7th Street, Davenport I A. Tickets 
are $2.00 i n advance, $3.00 at the 
door Tables are $4.00 each with 
a $2.00 additional charge for an 
electrical hookup (limited num- 
ber). Features will Include over 
$2,000 worth of major prizes. 
Hotel discounts and refresh- 
ments will be available. There 
will be a pre-hamfest Saturday 
night banquet with Paul Graver, 
midwest ARRL SCM, as guest 
speaker. Banquet tickets are 
$8,00 and reservations must be 
paid by February 18 t 1981, Talk- 
in on 146.2B/.88, WGBXR For ad- 
vance tickets, dinner, and table 
reservations, write Dave Jo* 
hannsen WB0FBP, 2131 Myrtle, 
Davenport IA 52804. 

GRAND JUNCTION CO 
MAR 7 

The Grand Mesa Repeater 
Society will hotd the second an- 
nua) indoor Western Slope 
Swapfest on March 7, 1981 r at 
the Lincoln Park Barn, 12th and 
Gunnison, Grand Junction CO. 
Doors will be open from 10:00 
am through 4:00 pm and admis- 
sion is free. Swapfest tables are 



$4.00 in advance. Attractions 
will include commercial exhibi- 
tors, a flea market, an auction, 
and prizes. Raffle tickets for the 
grand prize of a Tempo S-1 are 
$2.00 each. Talk-in on 146.22^.82. 
For further information, send an 
SASE to Larry Brooks WB0ECV, 
3185 Bunting Avenue, Grand 
Junction CO 81501, or call (303)- 
434-5603. 

MAUMEE OH 
MAR 22 

The Toledo Mobile Radio As- 



sociation, Inc., will hold Its 26th 
annual auction and hamfest on 
Sunday, March 22 t 1981 , at the 
Lucas County Recreation Cen- 
ter. Key Street, Maumee OH. 
Hours are from 8:00 am to 5:00 
pm. The free auction starts at 
10:00 am. There will be ample 
free parking all day and over- 
night, Tickets are $2.00 in ad- 
vance and $3.00 at the door 
Flea market tables are ava i lable: 
displays are limited to electron- 
ics and ham gear. There will be 
commercial exhibits, refresh- 



ments, door prizes, and a big raf* 
fie— all inside. Prizes include a 
Kenwood T5-13Q with power 
supply, two loom IC-2AT HTs T a 
Bird Wattmeter, and many more. 
There will be an additional 
ladies' program. Bring your YL, 
XYL, or OM and make a day of it. 
TaIMn on 146,52^.52. Area re- 
peaters are 146.01/61, 146.19/ 
.79, 146.34/,94, 147.87/.27, and 
147.9757.375. For additional in- 
formation, write J. Honisko 
N8BGH, 1733 Parkway Drive N.> 
Maumee OH 43537. 



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73 Magazine • February, 1981 113 



/WARDS 



from page 23 

enclose only three (3) IRCs with 
your application. 

Joe Onizuka JE1WIH mailed 
me information about the 
NKDXC Award. Unless you work 
a lot of Japanese stations, the 
requirements are not as easy as 
it seems. 

NKDXC AWARD OF JAPAN 

The Northern Kyushu DX 
Club, Inc., issues the NKDXC 
Award to any licensed amateur 
or SWL station in the world. 

Applicants must submit proof 
of confirmation of QSO with at 
least 20 different stations which 
enable you to spell 'NORTH* 
ERN KYUSHU DX CLUB" using 
the last letter of eachcallsign. A 
station may be used only once 
in your spelling effort. 

There are no band or mode re- 
strictions, but special endorse- 
ments will be rendered for single 
mode or band achievements. 



Do not forward QSLs. GCR 
apply. Forward your verified list 
with five (5} IRCs to: NKDXC 
Award Manager, PO Box 11, 
Yawata. Kita, Kyushu, Japan 
805. 

50-MHZ DX AWARD OF JAPAN 

The award is issued in four 
levels of difficulty: Class EX— 
applicant must make 20 DX 
country contacts; Class A — ap- 
plicant must make 10 DX coun- 
try contacts; Class B— 5 DX 
countries must be worked; and 
Class C — only 2 DX country con- 
tacts need be made. 

While applicants are not re- 
quired to submit QSL cards t 
they must have them on hand 
and verified by at least two 
amateurs or a local radio club 
secretary. Keep in mind, 
however, that all contacts must 
be made on six (6) meters, 50 
MHz, utilizing any mode 
authorized. 

Forward your claim and 



award fee of 8 IRCs or $3,00 to: 
Eiichl Konno JA7GZA, Awards 
Manager, 8-3 Tenjinmae, Henai- 
zumMown, Nishiiwai-gun t Iwate 
029-31, Japan. 

TEXAS INDEPENDENCE DAY 

Brenham Amateur Radio Club 
will be operating its second an- 
nual special event QSL station 
to commemorate Texas Inde- 
pendence Day and Its obser- 
vance at the site where indepen- 
dence was declared from Mex^ 
ico on March 2, 1836. Washing- 
ton on the Brazos, Texas. 

We plan to operate from 1600 
UTC, Saturday, February 28, un- 
til 2300 UTC, Sunday, March 1, 
during times when the bands 
are open (no nets are scheduled) 
on the following frequencies 
plus or minus QRM: 3944, 7244, 
14,344 f 21.144, 21.444, and 
28,544 kHz. 

For an historic QSL card and 
information brochures, ama- 
teurs are asked lo please QSL 
with an SASE (4'/*" x W or 
larger) to BARC, WB5STR/5, PO 
Box 44, Brenham TX 77833. 

Amateurs who worked 
WB5STR/5 last year should so 



indicate on their QSL and will be 
recognized this year. 

We are grateful to Robert Fiu- 
william of Kay, Texas, for the 
use of his call which will be used 
with the phonetics, Washington 
on the Brazos, 5, Star of the 
Texas Republic. 

LOVE OUR LIBRARY 

The Lawrence County Ama- 
teur Radio Association is spon- 
soring a Valentine's Day theme 
special event from downtown 
New Castle, Pennsylvania, at 
our new public library on Febru- 
ary 13^14, 1981. 

We will be operating from the 
new library and the theme will 
be *1 love my new library." The 
call in use will be KA3X, and the 
operating frequencies are: 
147.795/ .1 95 (our local repeater), 
29.000. 21,400. 14.300, 7.250 and 
(CW) 7.125 MHz. 

All frequencies plus or minus 
QRM (except 2 meters). Operat- 
ing times are 1400-2200 GMT. 
Your QSL and $1.00 will bring a 
certificate. 

For further information, con- 
tact John Hudak KA3X, 422 
Galbreth Avenue or Zach Alter* 
ton KB3MC, 124 Richelieu Ave., 
Newcastle PA 16101. 



H4M HELP 



I am in need of a schematic 
for a Mlcro-Z FM36 frequency 
counter with prescaler. I will be 
glad to pay copying costs and 
postage. 

Dennis L. Cornell WD4HRO 

7835 Captain St 

Mllllngton TN 38053 

Simon Langton Grammar 
Schools In Canterbury, England, 
are celebrating the centenary of 
the founding of the school In 
1881. To this end, we shall be op- 
erating a special events station, 
active on all HF bands under the 
call GB4SLS, on February 22- 
28. 1 981 . During this time, we are 
anxious to contact as many 
past pupils of the school as pos- 
sible, especially those who are 
licensed amateurs and residing 
in the United States. 

Anyone Interested in making 
a sked with us should contact 
etther me Of G3LCK, c/o G30SL, 
Simon Langton Grammar 
School for Soys, Nackington 



Road, Canterbury, Kent, 
England. 

Andrew P. Smith G4BBW 

40 Virginia Road 

Tankerton, Whitstabie 

Kent, England 

I've had a bundle of letters 
and calls from readers re* 
questing a source for the 
positive resist that ! used in my 
article on easy PC artwork (73, 
June f 1980), 

Yesterday, I found a source 
that you may want to know of 
since I am buying a private-label 
brand locally. The national 
brand is by GC Electronics, 
Rockford, Illinois. The catalog 
number is 22-231 

Route Electronics, Rt. 22, 
Springfield NJ, sells it for 51 3.60 
for a large aerosol can. They do 
not mail order, 

Ed Eggert W3HIK 

2220 Marietta Ave. 
Lancaster PA 17603 



I need a copy of a complete 
schematic diagram or a manual 
for a Halllcrafters SX-100 receiv- 
er, I would prefer to copy at my 
end, but would pay for other 
costs. 

K. Gilhuly KA8EWH 

650 Ann Street 

Harbor Springs Ml 49740 

I have a Regency HR-2A 2- 
meter transceiver that is sick. 
Anyone who can provide a cir- 
cuit and servicing information 
would greatly assist me. I wiil 
pay for all expenses to copy 
them. 

Harvey Horn WB2NMN 

21 Skylark Lane 

Stony Brook NY 11790 

Searching for pre-32S-1 Col- 
lins transmitter in any condition 
to put on RTTY. If you have an 
old Collins AM/CW transmitter 
gathering dust and would part 
with it reasonably cheap, please 
send specifications, condition, 
and price. XYL is contemplating 
murder if I spend much money. I 
also need a CV-89 RTTY TU 
Thanks. 

Roger L Arnold N5CAO 
214 Hill Lane 

Red Oak TX 75154 



I need a schematic for a Kuhn 
model 357C VHF receiver and 
would like to copy and return a 
service manual for IC-21iDV-21 
2m VHF gear 

Jung Y* Lem KB6BO 

5222 Corlnga Dr. 

Los Angelas CA 90042 

Does anyone have schemat- 
ics for a Utica 650A 6m trans- 
ceiver and a Gonset Super Six 
converter? Expenses will be re- 
imbursed. 

Howard Robb AF0W 

340 So, 5th 

Bird Island MN 55310 

1 would like to get in touch 
with someone who has com- 
pleted the 220 transverter by 
Frank Kalmus WA7SPR in the 
October. 1979, issue of 7& 

Paul Ash more WAS HEP 

833 S. Chestnut 

Litchfield KL 62056 

Does anyone have any Info on 
a lower sideband addition for a 
MULTI-2000? Also, who is han* 
dling the MULTI-2000 now? Any 
help would be appreciated. 

Lloyd W. Locke K1 COS 

236 Walnut St. 
Reading MA 01867 



114 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



FUN! 



from page 26 

9} A4XAA is: 

1) The call used during a world-famous 1956 
DXpedition 

2) The Sultan of Oman 

3) A four-land call that will eventually be assigned 
by the FCC. 

4) A made-up call sign 

10) Which of the following is a former reciprocal callsign held by Jor- 
dan's King Hussein, JY1? 

1) EP1JY 

2)4Z4KH 

3) RG8U 

4) 7X2 HM 



ELEMENT 3— TRUEFALSE 

1) The newly self-proclaimed "Shah of 
Iran," son of the late Shah, is a ham. 

2) Until his recent automobile "'accident," 
YN1AS was former Nicaraguan dictator 
Anastasio Somoza. 

3) The DX Country Club Award is spon- 
sored by 73 Magazine, 

4) KA2BO is a DX callsign; KA28QV is not. 

5) To officially qualify as DX, a signal must 
travel more than 150 miles, no matter 
the mode or frequency. 

6) WWV, JJY, LOU NtGM, BOT, and RID 
are afl standard time and frequency sta- 
tions. 

7) The DX Operating Code says you should 
always call a DX station exactly on his 
frequency, 

8) KP2 Is the new prefix for KV4. 

9) BV2A and BV2B are the only licensed 
ham stations in the Republic of China. 
Both stations are operated by the same 
person, 

10) "GDX?" is a Q signal meaning, "Is there 
any DX on frequency?" 



True 



False 



ELEMENT 4— HAM ACROSTIC 

Guess the words defined and write them over the numbered 
dashes. Next, place each letter in the correct square in the puzzle. 
The black squares show word endings. The completed puzzle will 



6 45 20 

28" "29" "21~ ~64" "32" 



42 60 74 76 



41 26 
39~ 



66 50 



9 35 19 77 7 



49 73 51 5 40 23 
39" "58" ~W 



r r ---••• »■ 



75 



form a statement relating to amateur radio. (Illustration 2) 

A) Five hundred miles is DX in this 
region „..-. 

B) Popular DX mode 

C) Twenty meters, for instance 

D) "Shared" band....... 

E) DXer T s "shoes 5 ' 

F) FCC authorization .... 

G) Semi-automatic key,., . 

H) Conversation ...... 

I) Scarce DX 

J) Distress Signal 

K) Splatter .. 

U DE 

M) Lots of DX in a row,. 

N) When to work DX 

0)Uds... „ 

P) Venezuelan prefix........... 

Q) Temerarious DXer 

R) To tell a DXer something 

S) Computerized DX 

1) Irish prefix........ 



'■■■••■■ 



12 33 43 
37 56 2 

7i~^T3~ 

"3~"55"~2T 

72" "T~ "52" ~44~ 

Tl 61~~25~ 62 ^T~36 



34 24 57 46 31 



■ ■■*■«•■■■■■ 



54 63 17 18 11 



78 15 



46 47 65 67 



69 14 16 
70" 30 



FTfT"«"**»««*»"»' ■ ■»■■»■■■■ 



38 68 



THE ANSWERS 

Element 1: 

See illustration 1A. 

Element 2: 

1—3. More than one budding DXer has made his first African con- 
tact through this fine service. Net time is 1800 UTC, daily, 
2—3. A DXers best friend. 

3—1, Obviously not the 21st cycle in the history of the Earth, but 
only since man started counting— around 1750, 
4—2. You may need a *'long radio antenna'* for this band T but that 
has nothing to do with LORAN, 

5—4. If you chose "Cuba," I'll bet you didn't get your General ticket 
while the FCC was using its circa 1968 tests, A question similar to 
this one went a long way to giving the FCC its reputation for using 
tricky testing techniques. 

6 — 4. Since six is allocated to broadcasting and other services 
throughout the most of the world, there aren't even 100 6-meter 
countries on the air. 
7— t. When DXing on 80, it pays to know the allocations. 




Illustration 2 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 115 



c 


L 


1 


p 


P 


E 


R 


T 


O 


N 


D 












1 


F 


O 


8 





X 


N 


E 


P 


A 


L 


G 


. 


X 


P 


T 


E 




E 


u 


R 





D 


N 




E 


E 


1 


T 


U 


U 




E 


A 


D 


S 


V 




P 


A 


N 


T 


W 


1 


T 


O 


W 


N 




R 


A 


M 


s 


A 


T ! 


1 


M 


1 


s 


U 




1 


1 


N 




M 


O 


w 


D 


X 


B 


U 


R 





G 


E 


N 


E 


V 


A 


F 


L 


A 




N 




E 


G | N 




1 


E 




W 





n 


K 


1 


N 


G 


S 


P 


L 


1 


T 



Illustration 1A. 

8—3. But avid DXers also have many other picturesque terms for 

list-takers. 

9 — 2. Ever get the feeling there's enough royalty in ham radio to 

form a club? 

10 — 1, More royalty! King Hussein held this Iranian call before Kho* 

rnelni. Ayatollah you so. 

E feme nt 3: 

1) True— His call was EP1MP, Guess he's EP1MP/SU now. 

2) True— And he was listed in QST as a Silent Key. 

3) True— The more realistic DXGC. 

4) True— KA2BQ would be one of the "U.S. Personnel in Japan." 
KA2BQV would be an amateur In New York or New Jersey. 



5) False— If you ran Vz miHiwatt at 300 GHz, twenty feet would be 
DXi 

6) False— "BOT" and "MGIVt 1 ' are not stations. 

7) False— Not really. The DX station's frequency should be left clear 
so everyone can hear him. In reality, this never happens. 

8) True— Why? Only the FCC knows for sure. 

9) True— Tim Chen, operator of both stations, uses BV2A on CW and 
BV2B on phone. 

10) False— And "GRX?" means, "Are there any receivers on fre- 
quency?" 

Element 4: 

A— UHF, B— PHONE, C— BAND, D— FORTY. E— LINEAR, F— 
TICKET.G — BUG,H— QSO.I— RARE,J— S05,K— QRM.L— FROM, 
M— STRING, N— OFTEN, O— GOONS, P— YV, Q— RASH, R— SAY, 
S— IO, T— El. The completed message reads: R R QRK UR SIGS QSA 
VY ONE FOOT FROM PHONES ON GREBE FB OM HEARTY CON* 
GRATULATIONS THIS IS FINE DAY. So began the first amateur 
European-American QSO or> November 27, 1923, an exchange be- 
tween French stat ion SAB and U.S. 1 MO that opened the age of ham 

SCORING 

Element 1: 

Twenty points for the completed puzzle, or % point for each ques- 
tion correctly answered. 

Element 2 

Two points for each correct answer 

Element 3: 

Two points for each correct answer. 

Element 4: 

Two points for each correct definition. Give yourself 10 extra points 

if you unscrambled the message. 

Okay, DXers, let's see how you really measure up. Remember, big 
guys, your 100-foot towers won 1 ! help you here! 

1-20 points— Once heard a DL on 20 
21*40 points— 80 countries worked, 25 confirmed 
41-60 points— DXCC material 
61-80 points— 250+ countries confirmed 
81-100+ points— Honor Roll candidate 

Next month: How Hams View Themselves 





R ^^M 


R I 


Q 


R 


K ^^M U 


1 ^^H| 

R S 


1 
1 


G 


S 




S 


! 1 

A 


V 


Y 


■ 


N 


E 




F 








T j F 


R 


O 


^^H p 


H 





N 


E 




O 


N 


G 


R 


E 


B 


E 1 F 


B 




M ^^H 


H 


E 


A 


R 


T 


Y 


C 





N 


G 


R 


A 


T 


U 


L 


A 


T 


1 





N 


s ^^M 


T 


H 


1 


S 




1 


B F 


1 


N 


E ^^M 


D 


A 


Y 





Illustration 2 A. 




HAM HELP 



I have some two-meter crys- 
tals that I would like to sell or 
trade. Frequencies available 
are; T 146.880, TR 14&250/.850, 
TR 147.840V.240, R 147.330, R 



146.060, T 146.460, R 147.060, T 
146.040, and T 147.930. 

AH above fit in HC-25/U hold- 
ers. Specs are transmit funda- 
mental mode and parallel reso- 



nant with 30-pF toad. Divide 
transmit frequency by 12 to ob- 
tain crystal frequency. Receive 
specs are overtone mode, series 
resonant. Subtract 10.694 MHz 
and divide by 3 to obtain crystal 
frequency. 

Crystals I need are 146,01/.61, 
146/.47, 146.22/146,88, 146,28 
transmit, and 146.46 receive. 

If anyone will trade or tell me 
the going price of used good 
crystals or knows who can tell 



me, it will be greatly appreci- 
ated. 

Kevin Neal 

Route A t Sox 221 A 

Flippin AR 72634 

(501H53-8412 

I need a complete schematic 
of the Hallicrafters S-118 receiv- 
er, 

Keith Stowell WA9YOO 

10E.40th409 

Kansas City MO 64111 



116 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



REVIEW 



from page 65 

front-pane! keyboard which 
selects ail of the radio's func- 
tions. All memory data and com- 
mand instructions are per- 
manently programmed into the 
memory unit which is an integral 
part of the microprocessor IC. 
As such, the 2008 cannot be 
altered to receive or scan fre- 
quencies other than those in its 
regular VHF/UHF bands. 

The rig is unique in the fact 
that it is the only available syn- 
thesized scanner which does 
not have a searching capability. 
This should not prove to be 
much of a handicap, however, 
as many people who purchase a 
scanner are interested only in 
hearing the action on a predeter* 
mined set of frequencies, Thus, 
it is an ideal unit for the person 
who desires the convenience 
and economy of frequency syn- 
thesis, but who doesn't need a 
searching capability. 

An interesting feature on this 
unit is a recessed button on the 
rear panel marked "Reset," This 
button is simitar to the Clear key 
on a calculator and functions to 
erase all data which is stored In 
the scanner's eight-channel fre- 
quency/status memory. This is 
used to erase incorrect informa- 
tion on those few occasions 
when the microprocessor fails 
to initialize. 

Memory data is retained 
when the unit is unplugged and 
during power outages by using a 
9-volt battery stored in an easily- 
accessible compartment on the 
rear paneL During normal 
usage, the battery will last up to 
one year. If the radio is to remain 
out of service for more than sev- 
eral months, however, it is best 
to remove the battery to avoid 
possible damage due to electro- 
lyte leakage. 

An innovation over previous 
Realistic models is the select- 
able scan-delay circuit, which 
allows the user to program a 
two-second delay on individual 
channels. The channel lockout 
function is accomplished in a 
similar manner, using the front- 
panel keyboard. Delays and 
lockouts remain programmed 
even when the scanner is turned 
off. 



Frequency and status infor- 
mation is presented on a bright, 
blue fluorescent display which 
includes the channel number 
and indication whether the 
channel is programmed with a 
delay or lockout, and the six- 
digit frequency readout. 

The PRO-200S*s more com- 
mon features include on-off/vol- 
ume and squelch controls, a 3'* 
front-mounted speaker, front* 
mounted headphone jack, scan/ 
manual control, telescoping in- 
door antenna, external antenna 
jack, and ac power cord (the 
scanner is not designed for dc 
mobile operation). 

The scanner's circuitry is 
composed of an LSI micropro- 
cessor system, LSI phase- 
locked loop (PLL) frequency 
generation system, eight Inte- 
grated circuits, 24 transistors, 
and 40 diodes. These semicon- 
ductors, along with a host of 
passive components, team up to 
bring you a superheterodyne 
dual-conversion receiver capa- 
ble of synthesizing 18,160 fre- 
quencies. 

The synthesizer circuitry is 

capable of being programmed 
to receive any frequency in the 
30-50- and 144*1 74-MHz bands in 
5-kHz steps, and between 410- 
512 MHz in 12.5-kHz steps. 

The receiver sensitivity (for 
20-dB signal-to-noise ratio) is 1 .0 
uV on the VHF and low bands, 
and 2.0 uV on UHR This proved 
to be adequate for local recep- 
tion using the built-in antenna. 
For serious listening, an ex- 
ternal antenna is highly desir- 
able. 

Selectivity ratings for signals 
within 9 kH2 of the intended fre- 
quency are down 6 dB, and 
those signals within 17 kHz are 
reduced at least 50 dB, 

The scanner operates at a 
rate of 10 channels per second. 

Audio output is two Watts 
maximum with the internal 
speaker. The unit consumes 
about 15 Watts when operating. 

The large volume and squelch 
controls make for easy adjust- 
ment. Each control is marked 
with numerical logging indica- 
tors, making it easy to return to 
a particular voiu me/squelch set- 
ting. 

Frequency coverage of the 



2008 is a real plus; it will receive 
signals in the entire 410-420- 
MHz US Government band. 
While the lack of a searching 
function tends to limit the ad- 
vantage of having this band, it 
didn't take me long to find a few 
noteworthy stations hiding out 
in this "forbidden" part of the 
spectrum. With a little luck and 
a copy of one of the better 
known federal frequency 
guides, anyone should be able 
to make a number of educated 
guesses concerning active fre- 
quencies in this band. Verifying 
your guesses is the fun part! 

All in all, the Realistic PRO- 
2008 seems to be a good choice 
for the amateur who desires a 
synthesized scanner for use at 
home T office, or around the 
shack, While it has its short- 
comings, it should be seriously 
considered by anyone who is 
planning on buying a quality 
crystal less base station VHF/ 
UHF receiver. 

The Realistic PRO-2008 is 
priced at $259.95. For further in- 
formation, contact Radio Shack, 
1300 One Tandy Center, Fort 
Worth TX 761 02. Reader Service 
number 479, 

Louis A. Smith II N3BAH 

Latrobe PA 

GDX-1 DISCONE ANTENNA 

With the flurry of activity in 
VHF/UHF scanner radios, it isn't 
surprising that someone has 
come out with a high quality 
discone antenna. Most anten- 
nas for scanner reception at 
present are simple vertically- 
polarized dipole clusters. 

But the GDX-1 from TET- 
America is a different breed. Not 
only does it provide wideband 
reception, but it also is suited 
for transmitting as well. 

Discone antennas are inher- 
ently wideband. The GDX-1 is 
designed for continuous cover- 
age from 80-480 MHz, Feedpotnt 
impedance is 50 Ohms unbal- 
anced* so no matching balun 
transformer is necessary. The 
connector is a standard SO-239* 
Gain is stated as 3,0 dB, with a 
vswr typically less than 1.5:1 
throughout its passband. 

During transmit, the GPX 1 
will safely handle 500 Watts PEP 
making it suitable for virtually 
any communications applica- 
tion. The antenna is deceptively 
sturdy, weighing a healthy 2.9 kg 
(6.4 pounds). 

Our Field Test 

The GDX-1 arrives in disas- 
sembled form with an instruc* 



tion/parts-list sheet. Step-by- 
step assembly is a snap follow- 
ing the sequence. Hole toler- 
ances are excellent, with ele* 
ments and hardware lining up 
perfectly. 

Our model, one of the first off 
the assembly line, had an unfor- 
tunate problem: The connector 
was threaded in metric! We noti- 
fied the factory and were 
assured that subsequent runs 
had the problem corrected. 

The parts count worked out 
perfectly after we figured out 
that a "biss" is a bolt and a 
"clipper" is a clamp. Something 
was lost in the translation, Pur- 
ists may find the clamps slightly 
loose, but they may be bent 
slightly to tighten down on the 
elements. 

The elements are solid rod, 
and high-quality tooling is 
apparent throughout the anten- 
na. It is obviously thoughtfully 
designed and manufactured. 

On the air, the GDX-1 per- 
formed better than most moni- 
tor antennas and had the addi- 
tional flexibility of being fre- 
quency-agile continuously from 
80-480 MHz. This allows oper- 
ation on 3 amateur bands as 
well as reception on the 225-400 
MHz military aeronautical band, 
(It's better not to transmit therelj 
All things considered, espe- 
cially with the assurance that 
the metric oversight has been 
rectified, the GDX-1 is capable 
of excel lent performance as well 
as rugged immunity to wind. For 
further information, contact JET 
USA, Inc., 425 Highland Park- 
way, Norman OK 73069, Reader 
Service number 477. 

Robert B. Grove WA4PYQ 
Brasstown NC 

MFJ 1040 DELUXE 
RF PRESELECTOR II 

An unusual combination of 
accessories in one cabinet has 
been released by MFJ, a com- 
pany noted for their large cata- 
log of accouterments for radio 
communications. 

The new 1040 Deluxe Rf Pre* 
selector II houses both a flexibly 
receiver preselector and an ad- 
justable-delay relay to protect 
the delicate circuitry when used 
with a transceiver; Very thought- 
ful and very effective. 

Designed with applications 
agility in mind, the 1040 features 
at least 20 dB of preampltfica- 
tion. More important, the 1040 
doesn't introduce considerable 
circuit noise as do some other rf 
preamplifiers. 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 117 



Q is sharp, awarding the 
listener with good out-of-band 
rejection of unwanted signals. 
Gain may be continuously var- 
ied by a potentiometer of attenu- 
ated by 20 dB in on© increment 
by pressing a button, 

Circuit protection is automat- 
ic; when transmitted rf is 
detected by a high-gain sam- 
pling circuit, the antenna retay 
is automatically switched, by- 
passing the preamp. A front- 
panet pot may be adjusted to 
tune the receive delay— a sort of 
VOX — to prevent constant relay 
dropout during SSB excursions. 
Delay may be varied from to 
about 2 seconds. 

The dc amplifier used to con- 
trol the relay consists of two di- 
rect-coupled bipolar transistors; 
sampling from the antenna cir- 
cuit is through a 12-pF capacitor 
and rectified by two 1N34 
diodes, 

The preamplifier circuit is 
built around a 40673 dual-gate 
MOSFET, Preselection is ac- 
complished in four bands (1-54 
MHz), switching among four 
standard rf chokes, each of 
which becomes part of a tuned 
tank when connected across the 
320-pF main tuning capacitor 

Rear-apron connectors in a 
row (SO-239S and phono jacks in 
parallel) allow selection be- 
tween two antennas and two re- 
ceivers by front-panel push- 
buttons. 

When the 1040 is switched on, 
a red LED signals the status. 
When switched off, the antenna 
circuit automatically bypasses 
the electronics so that the rig 
feeds the antenna straight 
through. 

The preselector may be pow- 
ered by an external source of 9 
to 18 volts dc or by its compan- 
ion ac adapter. 

Our Test 

We were impressed at the 
small size and large flexibility of 
the MFJ-1040. Two tests were 
performed, one with a general 
coverage receiver, the other in a 
full transceive mode. 

First, the 1040 was connected 
to the antenna input of a Ken- 
wood FH0OO receiver; a 135-foot 
dipole was connected to the in- 
put of the preselector. 

With the preselector still 
switched off, signals came into 
the receiver business as usual, 
But with the preamplified pre- 
selector switched on and ad- 
justed to frequency, dead bands 
came alive! Keep in mind that 
20-dB gain is equivalent to more 



than 3 S-units, and thai amount 
of signal brought up out of the 
noise can be heard! 

Tuning the receiver through- 
out the range of the 1040 (up to 
30 MHz— we did not try it 
through 54 MHz although there 
was no question that it would 
work there), we determined that 
its gain was high and its selec- 
tivity was sharp. Out-ot-band im- 
ages and intermod were re« 
duced considerably and in many 
cases eradicated. The contin- 
uous adjustability of the gain 
stage made custom preamplifi- 
cation a snap. 

The contacts on the antenna- 
selecting push-buttons showed 
good isolation; high-level sig- 
nals were barely detectable 
when the receiver switch was 
pushed to an alternate output. 

A rear-apron jack provides the 
ability to remote-control the unit 
from a pair of shorting (or 
grounding) contacts In the 
transceiver. 

Next, the 1040 was connected 
to the station rig, a Triton II. 
Since the preselector is rated to 
withstand 350 Watts PEP, we 
weren't concerned that we 
might cause injury pumping 150 
Walts or so into the unit. 

Trying the combination first 
on ten meters, we were astound- 
ed at the increase in signal 
levels without a corresponding 
increase in background noise. 
Double-checking this perfor- 
mance, we cranked the Triton's 
gain control down to just below 
signal threshold; switching the 
1040 on, signals came in loud 
and clear! 

We repeated the exercise on 
all five bands with equal sue- 
cess. 

Next, we decided to fry to 
burn the unit out with rf I During 
transmit, the relay responded in- 
stantly. Releasing the mike but- 
ton, we heard the reassuring 
sound of the relay drop back to 
receive, accompanied by sig- 
nals once again. 

Transmitting again, we varied 
the settings of the VOX delay 
control as we spoke into the 
microphone and then released 
the button. Delay times were ad- 
justabie from to roughly 2 sec- 
onds, which would accommo- 
date any amateur mode: CW T 
AM, FM, SSB, RTTY, and even 
SSTV! 

For older rigs of questionable 
sensitivity, or even when used 
with modern rigs where thresh- 
old signals must be improved, 










The MFJ-1040 Deluxe Rf Preselector //. 



the MFJ-1040 is hard to beat. Its 
preselection should improve the 
performance of virtually any 
receiver or transceiver operating 
within its design range. For fur- 
ther information on this $99.95 
product, contact MFJ Enter- 
prises, PO Box 494, Mississippi 
State MS 39762. Reader Service 
number 476. 

Robert B. Grove WA4PYQ 
Brasstown NC 

THE PRACTICAL HANDBOOK 
OF AMATEUR RADIO FM AND 

REPEATERS 

Anyone who regularly reads 
Bill Pasternak's Looking West 
column in this magazine un- 
doubtedly will have more than a 
passing interest in his new 
book, The Practical Handbook 
of Amateur Radio FM and Re- 
peaters, written with Mike Mor- 
ris and published in 1980, at 
$9.95, by TAB Books, Actually, 
anyone who has more than a 
passing interest in FM and re- 
peaters will find this book a valu- 
able addition to his technical li- 
brary. This 538-page volume is 
more than just a practical hand- 
book—it's a complete one! 
Among the topics covered are 
the history of repeaters and FM, 
how to determine your needs 
when planning a repeater, fre- 
quency coordination, ATV and 
RTTY repeaters, and a wealth of 
other general topics. 

There are several chapters on 
the "people 1 ' end of repeaters, 
with extensive detail for repeat- 
er users and repeater owners. 
There is solid useful information 
on handling malicious interfer- 
ence and the "wild turkey." 
Hams looking for specific tech- 
nical information won T l be dis- 
appointed either; using no refer- 
ences other than this book, you 
could build a sophisticated re- 
peater system incorporating ev- 



ery bell and whistle known to the 
repeater world. The operative 
word here \s thorough! 

Perhaps your interest in FM 
and repealers is limited to ker- 
chunking local machines with 
the synthesized transceiver you 
got for Christmas, Maybe you 
are a trustee or technical con- 
sultant for a big repeater opera- 
tion. Whatever your level of in- 
terest or expertise, this book will 
enrich the hours you spend in- 
volved with FM and repeaters. 
For further information, contact 
LAB Books, tnc. t Blue Rtdge 
Summit PA 17214, 

PaulGrupp KA1LR 
73 Magazine Staff 

THE ARRL OPERATING 
MANUAL 

The ARRL Operating Manual, 
recently published, continues 
the League's tradition of supply- 
ing the ham with some of the 
best book bargains available to- 
day on the subject of amateur 
radio. Inexpensively priced at 
$5.00. this large-format, paper- 
bound edition is a compendium 
of up-to-date information on all 
phases of amateur radio. 

What the League's Handbook 
does for the technical aspects 
of our hobby, the Operating 
Manual does for the stylistic. In 
short, it can help almost anyone 
become a better operator, and It 
will be particularly useful to 
those of us who find ourselves 
getting involved in some new as- 
pect of the hobby such as com- 
puter RTTY. OSCAR, traffic han- 
dling, or even contesting. 

The Manual provides an inter- 
esting solution to the problem of 
publishing an authoritative text 
on all the diverse aspects of our 
hobby. Rather than trying to do 
the impossible (finding one au- 
thor conversant with all phases 
of ham life), the Operating Man- 



118 73 Magazine * February, 1981 



ual incorporates the talents and 
knowledge of fourteen authors, 
each of whom writes a chapter 
on his/her specialty. The result 
is a definitive collection of chap- 
ters on subjects as diverse as 
traffic handling and DXing, writ- 
ten by enthusiasts who know 
what they're talking about. 

Other subjects covered in- 
clude: rules and regs., SWLing, 
emergency communications, 
contesting, awards chasing, FM 
and repeaters, VHRUHF operat- 
ing, satellites, visual communi- 
cations, and microcomputers. 

In addition to being well edit- 
ed, the Operating Manual is lib- 
erally illustrated. The extensive 
use of figures, photos, tables, 
charts and even an occasional 
cartoon provides a refreshing 
change from the staid layouts of 
other League publications. 

For example, the chapter on 
contesting has several sample 
logs and dupe sheets, The chap- 
ter on DXing includes sample 
propagation charts, a tabular 
listing of countries organized by 
rareness of prefix, a list of inter- 
national ten-meter beacons, and 
a sample azimuthal, equidistant 
map of the world used to deter- 
mine great-circle bearings. The 
chapter on visual communica- 
tions features slow-scan TV pic- 
tures, weather satellite photos, 
and even some efforts at RTTY 

an. 

These chapters are typical of 
the treatment most topics re- 
ceive in the Manual While it is 
impossible to discuss all the 
subtleties of some of the more 
technically complex topics In a 
single chapter, the Manual does 
provide the neophyte with more 
than enough information to al- 
low him to get oriented in unfa- 
miliar terrain. In this vein, each 
chapter usually suggests addi- 
tional reading material or sup- 
plies lists of information 
sources. 

The ARRL Operating Manual 
is filled with good things, and 
the very richness of its content 
reflects the incredible diversity 
of our hobby, it will be a valuable 
reference work for anyone ex* 
plormg the vast landscape of 
amateur radio. If you are as con- 
cerned about your operating 
style and skill as you are with 
the purity of your emissions, or 
if you plan to become involved in 
some new aspect of the hobby, 
you'd do well to get a copy. The 
chances are good that it will an* 
swer lots of questions you've 
had in your mind. For further in- 



formation, contact the ARRL, 
NewingtonCT 06111. 

Chris Brown KA10 
73 Magazine Staff 

10-METER FM FOR THE RADIO 

AMATEUR; THE W-METER FM 

HANDBOOK 

One of the most interesting 
aspects of ham radio is building 
or modifying your own equip- 
ment. Unfortunately, equipment 
has gotten so complex and ex- 
pensive that most hams have re^ 
stricted their building and modi- 
fying activities to small acces- 
sories for their stations. Digital 
clocks and electronic keyers 
abound, but if a device is part of 
the station's rf chain, the 
chances are that it has the 
namepiate of a commercial 
manufacturer affixed to it, and 
its owner shakes with fear at the 
thought of taking a soldering 
pencil closer than three feet to 
his/her thousand-dollar elec- 
tronic baby, Now, that's all well 
and fine; with today's crowded 
band conditions, 1 am some- 
what relieved that such fine 
commercial gear is available, 
Most hams do not have the facil- 
ities to build and properly adjust 
their own SSB equipment to the 
level of quality available from 
manufacturers, and even if we 
could compete technically, we'd 
find the expense (time as well as 
money) prohibitive. 

OK, so we intellectually ac- 
cept the need for that expensive 
little box on the ham-shack ta- 
ble, but somehow that doesn't 
stop the urge to warm up the sol- 
dering iron and jump into some* 
thing feet first. You say you have 
three digital clocks and two 
electronic keyers, and you still 
want to build something? ! know 
the feeling. Relax, How about 10 
FM? 

Yup. There is a tot of FM activ- 
ity up around 29,6 MHz. Very lit- 
tle GRM, the atmosphere is free- 
wheel ing, the technology is up 
to date, and yet the equipment is 
very cheap. If you know some- 
one who is active on 10-meter 
FM, the chances are good that 
he uses a converted CB. What 
ever he is using, he'll tell you 
that he is having a lot of fun. 

What ail this Is leading up to 
is the recent release of two rath- 
er good books on the subject of 
10-meter FM. If this mode inter- 
ests you, you really should have 
copies of them, While each au- 
thor emphasizes a different as- 
pect of the mode, both give an 



excellent introduction to all the 
various facets of 10-meter FM, 
Both cover repeater operation, 
frequencies, antennas, equip- 
ment, and equipment conver- 
sion. 

How do they differ? Dave In- 
gram's book goes into greater 
detail on a wider variety of sub- 
jects, but Bob Heil's book (the 
Handbook) is the most complete 
source of information available 
on converting CB rigs that use 
the popular PL02A three-crystal- 
synthesizer configuration, if you 
are planning to convert a rig that 
uses this configuration, Bob 
Heil's book will prove to be ex- 
tremely useful. If you are plan- 
ning to get on the air using a dif- 
ferent approach, or just want to 
know more about this mode, 
Dave Ingram's book might be 
more interesting to you. Both 
books tell you all you need to 
know to begin enjoying 10-meter 
FM, and at $4.95 each, these 
1980 publications are relatively 
inexpensive; I'd get both of 
theml For further information, 
contact Metco Publishing, PO 
Box 28, Manssa IL 6225? for Bob 
Heirs book and TAB Books, inc.. 
Blue Ridge Summit PA 1 7214 for 
Dave Ingram's book. 

Paul Grupp KA1LR 
73 Magazine Staff 

DIGITAL ELECTRONICS: A 

HANDS-ON LEARNING 

APPROACH 

Digital electronics has really 
arrived, and it's here to stay; it's 
getting hard to find a piece of 
ham gear that doesn't incorpor- 
ate some digital circuitry. All of 
us have absorbed a remarkable 
amount of the new technology, 
but many hams have wished for 
a complete, step-by-step intro- 



duction to the subject. If you 
learned electronics the way I 
did, by reading whatever books 
and magazine articles you could 
get your hands on, you just 
might find this book useful. The 
author assumes that the reader 
has no previous knowledge, so 
nothing js skipped or glossed 
over. He begins by explaining 
how resistors and diodes work, 
but when you are through with 
the book you'll be comfortable 
with microprocessors. Best of 
all, the book is a true hands-on 
approach, so most subjects in- 
clude a carefully explained proj- 
ect to carry out on a solderless 
breadboard. You say you don't 
have a solderless breadboard? 
Shame on you! As the author 
points out, if you really want to 
learn about this stuff, you are 
going to have to jump in and do 
it. 

Fortunately, doing it is exact- 
ly what the author has in mind, 
and he has provided lots of valu- 
able information on the mechan- 
ics of building digital circuits. 
He has thoughtfully included 
chapters on troubleshooting, 
circuitboard construction, and 
even the electronic color code. 
He starts with very simple proj- 
ects, but the meat is there too; 
after working your way through 
this book you won't have to 
make excuses for your lack of 
knowledge on the subject. The 
digital revolution has been go- 
ing on for a long time now; why 
not join the fun! Copies of Digi- 
tal Eiectronics: A Hands-On-Ap- 
proach (by George Young, 1980) 
are available at $8,95 from the 
Hayden Book Company, Inc., 
Rochelle Park NJ. 

Paul Grupp KA1LR 
73 Magazine Staff 




MM HELP 



I recently purchased a Hy- 
Gain model 623 23-channel 
AM/SSB CB rig for conversion to 
10 meters. Unfortunately, I have 
found no information on con* 
verting this radio. Does anyone 
have any information on this? 

Wayne T« Mohrhauser NtBUY 

Rt1 t Box134 
Chester I A 52134 

I need a copy of National 
Semiconductors Optoelec- 
tronics Handbook for 1975, I 



would prefer to purchase one 
outright, but wilt pay a reason- 
able cost for a copy. 

Lou Slaton WD5IBD 

5959 Cyrus Ave. 

Baton Rouge LA 70805 

I need a schematic for a Na- 
tional NG-46 receiver, I will be 
gfad to pay any expenses in- 
volved, 

Floyd Williams 
121 N 59th St 
Philadelphia PA 19139 



73 Magazine • February/1981 119 



NEW PRODUCTS 



from page 30 

board. It is designed for the 50, 
144, and 220-MHz bands and 
may be modified for use on adja- 
cent commercial and govern- 
ment bands, It is used for con- 
trol (inks, repealer service, te* 
lemetry, and other applications 
for which a small unit Is re- 
quired, A multichannel adapter 
is also available to extend oper- 
ation up to 5 channels. 

Features include low-imped- 
ance dynamic mike and high 
level audio inputs; crisp, clear 
modulation; low spurious out* 
put; pre-wound coils; adjustable 
output level, and built-in test 
points for easy alignment. A 
commercial-grade* frequency- 
stability option is available. 

Another new development at 
Hamtronics is the availability of 



XV2 2-meter and 1V4-meter 
transmitting converter kits with 
6-meter inputs. 

For further information, con- 
tact Hamtronics, tnc. r 65F Mouf 
Rd„ Hilton NY 14468, Reader 
Service number 481. 

PALOMAR ENGINEERS 
TRANSCEIVER PREAMPLIFIER 

Palomar Engineers has an- 
nounced a new preamplifier 
which is continuously tunable 
and covers all amateur bands 
from 160 through 6 meters. It 
provides 20 dB of gain with a 
dual-gate FET for low noise fig- 
ure. The gain and low noise fig- 
ure improve reception on most 
receivers, particularly on the 
higher frequency bands. The 
added selectivity reduces image 
and spurious response. 



Gain is continuously variable 
to prevent overloading the re- 
ceiver. An rf-sensing circuit al- 
lows the unit to be used with 
transceivers; the preamplifier 
automatically bypasses itself 
during transmit. The fail-safe 
switching circuit handles trans- 
ceivers to 350 Watts. Connec- 
tors are SO-239. The preampli- 
fier measures 8 M x5"x3" high 
and features brushed-aluminum 
control panels. 

For a free descriptive bro- 
chure, write Palomar Engineers, 
PO Box 455, Escondido CA 
92025. 

CDE HAM ROTOR 
FOR THE VISUALLY- 
IMPAIRED OPERATOR 

CorneH-Dubiiier Electronics 
has produced a rotor system es- 
pecially designed for sight-im- 
paired amateurs. The Ham-SP is 
a combination of the Ham-IV ro- 
tator and a solid-state control 
unit. 

All operation functions of the 
control unit, 360° compass dial, 



on/off switch, and push-to-start 
button, are marked visually as 
weil as by Braille. To operate the 
system, the desired antenna di- 
rection is selected by turning 
the large dial. The start button is 
then pressed. Electronic cir- 
cuitry will automatically retract 
the wedge brake and start the 
rotator turning to the desired di- 
rection. During the time the rota* 
tor is turning, a high-pitched 
tone is emitted. When the rota- 
tor reaches the predetermined 
direction, power is removed 
from the motor, it is allowed to 
coast down about 5 seconds, 
and then the wedge brake is en- 
gaged. When the rotator stops, 
the tone stops, indicating that 
the antenna is now at the de* 
sired location. (Neither the rota- 
tor nor the control unit are com- 
patible with other CDE rotor sys- 
tems,) 

For further information, write 
to Cornelt-Dubilier Electronics, 
Department SP t 118 East Jones 
Street, Fuquay-Varina NC 
27526. Reader Service number 
484. 









The Palomar Engineers Transceiver Preamplifier. 



The CDE Ham rotator for visuaffy-impaired amateurs. 



HM HELP 



I am in need of any libraries of 
73, QST, HR, CO, or any other 
amateur or electronics oriented 
publications. Anyone wishing to 
clean out the bookshelves, 
please contact me on any offer- 
ings. Thank you! 

Ralph Francavilla KA2BTD 

154 Redneck Ave. 

Utile Ferry NJ 07643 

(201 )-641 -9494 



A disabled amateur needs the 
generous help of some warm- 
hearted hams. I had to move to 
small, limited space QTH t due to 
my roommate's marriage and 
my severe medical problems. I 
now live alone and ham radio is 
my only form of entertainment. 

I need the donation of tower 
sections to erect a 50- foot tower 
with a rotor. If you can help* 



please write {I don't have a 
phone). Thank you. 

Allen Halliday 

64 West Center St M #3 

Mid vale UT 84047 

I need manuals and schemat- 
ics on the following equipment: 
Hickok 288X signal generator, 
533 A tube tester, and 760 video 
scanner, and alignment proce- 
dures on a Haillcrafters 
R-44/ARR 5 (the military version 
of the S-27). I will gladly pay 
postage and copying costs. 

Bill Fraser KAiFEX 

6220 Parkwood Rd. 

Edina MN 56436 



Js anyone out there using a 
Heath H-89 on CW or RTTY? 
What do I need to get mine go- 
ing? 

D. Kight WA5RER 

3732 NW 48th Circle 

Oklahoma City OK 73112 

Connecticut summer camp 
seeks counselors (21 + ) to work 
with teenagers in its ham radio 
program during July and Aug- 
ust. Apply to Buck's Rock— 
K1PGQ, 140 Riverside Drive, 
New York NY 10024: (2l2>-362- 
2702. 

Louis Simon, Director 
New York NY 



120 73 Magazine * February, 1981 



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Subscrfptii 
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Hon 



73 Magazine does not keep subscrip 
tion records on the premises, there- 
fore calling us onfy adds time and 
doesn't solve the problem 

Please send a description of the 
problem and your most recent ad- 
dress label to 



73 Magazine 
Subscription Dept. 
PC Box 931 

Farmingdaie, NY 11737 



Thank you and enjoy your subscri pticwi. 



this publication 
is available in 

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73 Magazine * February, 1981 121 



« 






RT7Y LOOP 



Yi 



from page 16 

terminal. "StupidT you ask? 
Well, a dumb terminal, com* 
monly called a glass Teletype, 
just inputs what you type and 
displays what it gets. Smart ter- 
minals can do all kinds of fancy 
editing and other neatniks. This 
one is somewhere in between. 
With the resident 6800 and some 



RAM it could be given some 
smarts with the appropriate pro* 
gramming, but remains of lim- 
ited usefulness if what you real 
ly need is a computer terminal. 

Next month I wilt take a look 
at some belts and whistles avail- 
able for the ATR-6800 and de- 
scribe a typical orht he-air ses- 
sion, It promises to be a real eye- 
opener! 



L INEA R 



2 to 



400 MHZ 



jfBOO* 

1DDDWATT 
13 Different Madels.SBpgs 

A. P. Systems ^. S1L95 

Box 263 sm. ^""^ 

Newport, Rl 02840 (401) 846-5627 ^sm 



pLA 




LETTERS 



from page 28 

the communication . p .phase of 
the art/' as listed in Part 97.1(d), 
Thanks for lending an ear. I 
like 73 much better than "the 
other one/* but I agree that 
perhaps you might have at (east 
one feature for the beginner or 
Novice operator. 

Cindy Dalmadge KA&IMG 
Colorado Springs CO 



NO PRICE 



Your editorials are first read- 
ing! I agree— the advertisers 
who put no price on a new piece 
of gear make me so damn mad 
that I won't buy it. 

I need an antenna switch and 
saw a new one advertised in 73 
—but no price. Should I spend 
15 cents and my time for a letter 
to the manufacturers? 

I know what I can afford. So if 
it's out of my price class, I'd like 
to know now, 

John Cowley WA6PBM 
Rosamond CA 



GOLDWATER 

Enjoyed the article in the No- 
vember 73 issue on Barry Gold- 
water K7UGA. I had a short QSO 
with him a few years ago. 

Here is a man who has sup- 
ported amateur radio in that 
maze of bureaucracy in Wash- 
ington DC for many years, The 
Senator is a man who for years 
has told the general public just 
the way it is. We have too many 



politicians who beat around the 
bush and tell each group just 
what they want to hear, some* 
times distorting the truth. 

Wish we had more people in 
his position who would support 
our hobby. We as hams must 
speak up and band together 
before we find ourselves on the 
outside looking in. 

Alfred L. Pedneau K5HKG 

Pineville LA 



BUY AMERICAN 

Thank you for your comments 
in Never Say Die and especially 
DX. I feel the comments on the 
amateur situation are well 
taken* Just today I wrote anoth- 
er magazine to criticize an edi- 
torial on basically similar topics. 
This other magazine recom- 
mended dropping the code re- 
quirement and relaxing the test* 
ing standards to allow thou- 
sands of new "amateurs" to 
come into our ranks. The pro- 
posed reason for this was to 
help the American radio manu- 
facturers compete with the 
Japanese companies. 

It is my opinion that we al- 
ready have too many undisci- 
plined amateurs causing inter- 
ference. Just recall the recent 
hurricane nets. If the code and 
theory requirements do nothing 
else, they do force one to disci- 
pline one's self to learn these. 

In coming into amateur radio, 
1 believed the purposes were 
those set forth in the FCC rules, 
not to see how many radios we 
can sell I am pleased to hear 



about all the experimentation 
which amateurs are doing even 
in modifying new, commercially- 
built hgs. 

Amateur radio can fulfill a 
useful purpose in the country as 
long as it remains organized and 
disciplined. This should be more 
than a hobby. Let us not invali- 
date our purposes by making it a 
glorified CB band. 

This other magazine I referred 
to also indicated that Japanese 
equipment was better made 
than American. I have had the 
most recent solid-state HF rigs 
from Yaesu t Kenwood, and 
Drake, and find the TR7 to be 
better than any of the others. 
The Japanese rigs looked good 
and had all the bails and whis- 
tles, but my experience thus far 
has been that some of the 
knobs, such as noise blanker, 
speech processor, i-f shift, 
notch filter, etc., did not work or 
worked poorly. However, with 
the Drake, 1 had to pay extra for 
many items, but they seemed 
well engineered and worked 
welL It is not so much the looks 
but how St performs that counts. 
It seems in many Gases that you 
still get what you pay for. I find 
nothing revolting in the sugges- 
tion we attempt to buy American 
first. 

Tim Johnson N5BTE 
Bristow OK 



BLUE FROG 



] 



I read with interest your expla- 
nation of why your radar jam- 
ming didn't work as well as why 
commercial units don't work. I 
must agree that they do not. 
However, I can't agree with you 
on the reason why. 

You state that if the jammer is 
a mere 3 kHz off of the radar gun 
frequency that the radar gun will 



not pick up the jammer This is 
not so; radar guns are very wide 
on receive and drift a huge 
amount on transmit, The 3 kHz 
you mention is nothing. I can 
change the frequency of a gun 
oscillator that much by blowing 
on it. If you don't mind, let me ex- 
plain the error of radar jamming 
and how to correct it. 

First of all, the thing that peo- 
ple do not realize or tend to ig- 
nore is that police radar is built 
to display the fastest speed 
from many doppler signals. 
Now, if you jam at, say, 50 mph, 
as most commercial units do 
and drive over that speed, the 
radar unit will first pick up 50 
because the jamming signal will 
be stronger than your reflection. 
But as soon as you come within 
normat range if you are driving 
faster then the jam speed, he 
will pick up your speed just like 
the jammer wasn't working, 

So, the only thing you can do 
is to jam at a much higher speed 
than what you are traveling, 
hoping that the policeman will 
not believe his radar unit. Let's 
say you like driving at 70; you 
should jam at around 1 10 so that 
his unit will pick up 110 and he 
won't believe you are traveling 
that fast. He will then ignore the 
reading and you, But this only 
works with still radar. For mov- 
ing radar you must use a dif- 
ferent method. 

Moving radar is really taking 
two readings, the police car 
speed and the combined speed 
of his car and your car. It first 
picks up the signal bouncing off 
a tree or grass, etc., and gives 
his speed, then it looks for a 
much higher speed which is that 
of your car approaching his. It 
then subtracts his speed from 
his and your combination which 
leaves your speed. But moving 
radar, like still, looks for the 
fastest speed. 



122 73 Magazine * February, 1981 



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** Reader Service— see page J 46 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 123 



So, if you jam at 1 10 and drive 
70 and he is moving 50 then his 
unit sees two speeds. The jam of 
1 1 minus 50 which gives 60 and 
120 minus 50 which gives 70. His 
unit will display 70 and you are 
in for another ticket, So, we are 
back to giving him a reading that 
he won't believe if you want to 
jam him. 

Lets say you like to drive 70, 
then a good choice for a jam 
speed is 150. if he is driving 55 or 
less, then his moving radar- will 
show 95 or more which he prob- 
ably won't believe. The faster 
you travel, the faster you jam at. 
The best ail around jam speeds 
seem to be between 150 and 
170. This way you will get still, 
as wail as moving units. 

In cities or where the speed 
limit is something other than 55, 
you must modify this method to 
the best speed. Also, the modu- 
lation is important. The best re- 
sults are gotten with a square 
wave with a 50% duty cycle. Ra- 
dar units tend to ignore sine 
waves, i would dare say that if 
you modulated your 10*GHz 
transmitter the proper way and 
for the proper speed, it would do 
a fine jamming job even If it is \n 
the ham band. A good modula- 
tor can be made from a 555 driv- 
ing a voltage regulator driving 
the Gunn source. 

Ali of what I have said is 
based or* my personal experi- 
ence. Some friends and I have 
worked many months with our 
own radar units to perfect a 
good jammer. It has never failed 
to jam any X-band radar unit I 
have come across and you 
should see the look on the 
small-town policeman's face 
when you drive through at 20 
and he reads 90. 



But all in all, its not worth the 
risk because jamming is never a 
sure thing, The best thing to do 
is get the best detector on the 
market and take your chances. 

I must say that you are wel- 
come to print this but not my 
name or address. I don't need 
the law knocking at my door as 
well as the kooks of this world. 
So, for my protection, just sign 
me, 

Blue Frog 

OK, Blue, serves me right for lis- 
tening to "experts" on radar. 
You sure won't see me messing 
around with jammers and then 
trying to explain in court that I 
really wasn't going t10 f as the 
radar read out — Wayne. 



NO DUMBBELL 



I have just completed a CW 
chat with a relatively new Extra 
whose fist was comparable to 
that of a brand new Novice! 

The point I am trying to make 
is that this learned gentleman is 
being given the privileges of a 
full-blown Extra class amateur, 
but cannot perform the simplest 
of Novice requirements in the 
field of sending code. At the 
same time, I and many other 
Generais are being deprived of 
the few additional privileges of 
an Advanced class license be- 
cause we don't know what a re- 
flex klystron Is used for, and be* 
cause Dick Bash came up with 
an idea for teaching aspiring 
hams some inside facts about 
rad io theory and how to pass the 
FCC tricky-tests. 

The fact is that the ARRL and 
Ameco came out with FCC 



CORRECTIONS 



In my article and computer 
program, "The Odd Couple,' 1 in 
the November, 1980 f issue of 73 
Magazine, page 110, a line of 
code was dropped somewhere. 
Please Insert this statement so 
that the channel 8 calculation 
will work: 620 L = 23-F. Also, a 
parenthesis should be put 
around part of line 405: 405 J = 
95,8-(1 .48*0) 

For those not familiar with 
Level I "shorthand" and who are 
trying to translate the listing, 



see the accompanying table. 





Level II 


Level I 


Standard 


CLS 


clear screen 


P. 


PRINT 


G. 


GOTO 


IN. 


INPUT 


( ) + ( ) 


Logical AND 




(see tines 130 




and 1003) 




Rich Casey WA9LRI 




1818 Hemlock 




Garland TX 75041 



questions and answers a long 
time ago t with complete approv- 
al of FCC, I know, because I 
studied them until I could an- 
swer them forward and back- 
ward, and I studied every other 
piece of information I could get 
my hands on that dealt with the 
outline FCC said we would need 
to understand when we took the 
test, i knew how, when, where, 
and why but what I got was a set 
of questions that were far afield 
from the FCC outline and the 
test was as simple as if it had 
been written in Greek, 

A friend heard about Bash 
and got his Finai Exam, studied 
it diligently for weeks. You see, 
Mr. Bash teaches how problems 
are worked and why the a nswers 
are what they are. He teaches 
the subject while he gives the 
answers. My friend passed easi- 
ly , , . so I got the Bash book. 

My test came one month after 
by friend had taken his and by 
that time, the FCC had decided 
to go after Bash. Again, I had 
added Ameco and ARRL to my 
studies, along with the Bash 
book, but again they beat me to 
the draw and I got a set of ques- 
tions printed on brand new, 
crisp paper. Three questions 
were similar to the ones in the 
Bash book but six were taken al- 
most word for word from the 
ARRL questions and answers in 
the Extra class section of their 
training manual! 



Another friend of mine went 
to Tulsa the following month, 
after having failed (as I did and 
all but one of the other Ad- 
vanced aspirants did who took 
the test in Oklahoma City), but 
he ordered Mr. Bash's updated 
Finai Exam that contained 
something like four hundred 
questions and answers! He, too, 
had studied every other book he 
could get his hands on + Imagine 
his chagrin when, for the third 
time he was handed a crisp, new 
set of questions, which dealt 
with doodads he had never 
heard of! 

Let me close by saying that I 
am a retired airplane driver. I 
logged some twenty thousand 
hours of accident-free pilot time 
and taught scores of others to 
fly, including Military Cadets, 
but I can't design an airplane, 
weld a piece of tubing, splice a 
cable or spray paint a fuselage. I 
passed every written test I took 
from FAA on the first try, so I 
think I am no dumbbell! 

If an Extra class amateur can 
get his ticket and all those privi- 
leges when he sends code like a 
new Novice, why are we Gener- 
als flunked because the FCC 
wants to annihilate Dick Bash 
for doing what ARRL has done 
for years and we don't happen to 
know what the angle of conduc- 
tion is in a Class AB amplifier? 

Loren Carlberg WB5WDG 
Muskogee OK 



MM HELP 



If you were a civilian radar 
field service engineer working 
with the military, in uniform, 
overseas during WWII, please 
get in touch with me regarding 
possible official US recognition 
for your services. Thank you. 

Bill Falk K7WJF 

PO Box 171 

Apache Junction AZ 85220 

I am blind and bedridden with 
spinal arthritis for 11 years now. 
I am a UCLA grad, class of 1958, 
In History. I'd like to listen to 
good, clear shortwave overseas 
radio broadcasts if I could get a 
smalt shortwave radio receiver 
like a Kenwood. Drake, Sony, 
etc. 

I am writing to 73 Magazine in 
hopes that someone might help 
me get this radio donated some- 
how, used or new. I need a com- 



pact solid-state radio since I am 
cramped for space in my small 
hospital room, 

Richard Jastrow, Ward 800B 

Long Beach General Hospital 

2597 Redondo Ave. 

Long Beach CA 90606 

(213J-426-4936 

I am in need of a schematic 
for a Yaesu FT DX-570. 1 will pay 
for a copy and postage. Thank 
you very much. 

Todd Greenleaf KA1CFQ 

108 Edward Ave. 

Pittsfield MA 01201 

I would like to contact some- 
one who has been able to put 
the FTT594/ARC-38A on the air 
Thank you. 

Murle Mattern KA6DOV 

1111 Warburton 

Santa Clara CA 95050 



124 73 Magazine ■ February, 1981 




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comes with 4K of low power RAH fully address- 
able anywhere m 64K win built-in memory pro- 
tect and a cassette interlace Provisions have 
been made for all other options on the same 
board and it Ms neatly into the hardwood cabinet 
alongside the Super Etl. The board includes slots 
for up to 6K ol EPROH (2708, 275B. 2716 or T| 
2716) and is fully socketed, f PROM can be used 
Tor the monitor and Tiny Basic or other pu rposes 

A IK Super ROW Monitor £1195 is available as 
an on board option in 2706 EPflOM which has 
been preprogrammed with a program toader 
editor and error checking mufti file cassette 
read write software, (relocatable cassette hie) 
another exclusive from Quest If includes regis I er 
save and readout, block move capability and 
video graphics driver with blinking cursor. Break 



Quest Super Basic V5.0 

A new enhanced version of Super Basic now 
available Quest was the first company 
vofttwde to ship a full sue Bask tor 1802 
Systems A complete t unction Snner Basic by 
Ron Ca ntor including floating pgntt capao 
with scientific notation [number range 
±r.17E"). 32 bit integer ■ ? billion, multi dim 
arrays, string arrays; string mamputatron, cas 
sette I/O; save and load, basic, data and ma- 



points can be used with the register save feature 
to isolate program bugs suickfy then follow with 
single step if you have the Super Expansion 
Board ma Super Monitor the monitor is up and 
running at the push of a button 

Other on board options include Parallel Input 
and Output Ports with lull handshake They 
allow easy connection ol an ASCII keyboard to the 
input port RS 232 and 20 ma Current Loop lor 
teletype pr other device are on board and if you 
need more memory there are two S-100 slots for 
static RAM or video boards Also a 1K Super 
Monitor version 2 with video driver for full capa- 
onrfy dtspiay with Tiny Basic and a video interface 
board Parallel 10 Ports £9,85. RS 232 £4 50 
TTY 20 ma If £1.95. £100 £4.50. A 50 pin 
connector set with ribbon cable is available st 
Si 'j 25 lor easy connection between Ehe Super 
Bf and the Super Expansion Board 

Power Supply Kit tor the complete system (see 
Mulri-volt Power Supply ) 



chine language programs and over /b state- 
ments functions and operations. 



indudino, rt- 



New improved faster version 

wnbtr and essentially eannaB 

msd, an exDustve user Bvparaasie commano 

libraiy 

Sena! and Parallel 10 included 

Super Bask on Cassette £55.00. 



Gremlin Color Video Kit $69.95 

32 * 16 alpha-numerics and graphics, up to 8 
colors with 6847 chip; IK RAM at EO0Q Plugs 
info Super EH 44 pin bus No high res grapf-cs 
On board RF Modulator Kit $4.95 



1802 16K Dynamic RAH Kit $149.00 

Ej$andabfe to 32K Hidd€n refresh w docks up to 4 
MHz w/no wan states Add) I6K RAM £63.00 

Super Elf 44 pm expansion board; 3 female and f 
mate bus Board plus 3 connectors £22.95 
Tiny Bask Extended on Cassette £15.00 

fadded commands include Stringy, Array, Cas- 
sette 10 etc.) 

S-100 4 Slot EipansioB £ 9 95 

Super Monitor VI I Source Listing £1 5 00 



Elf II Adapter Kit $24.95 

Plugs mta Elf II providing Super Elf 44 and 50 pin 
plus S-iOO bus expansion iWith Super Ex- 
pansjoni High and low address displays. sUe 
Md mode LED s opbonai £19,00. 



Super ColorS-100 Video KJ1S129.95 
Expand able to 2% % 192 high resolution color 
graphics 6647 with all display modes computer 
■jontrullrjd Memory mapped. IK RAM expanda- 
ble to 6K S-100busiB02J0cUBO65,Za0eLc. 
Editor Assembler £25.011 

{Requires minimum ol 4K for E A plus user 
source | 

1&Q2 Tiny Basic Source listing £19.00 

Super Monitor V 2. 02.1 Source Listing $20.00 



TERMS: £5 00 mm. order U.S. Funds, Calif residents add &% tai, 

£10.00 min. BankAmericard and Master Charge accepted, £1.00 insurance optional. 
Postage; Add 5%, C00 $10.00 min. order, 



FREE: Send lor your copy of our NEW 1980 

QUEST CATALOG. Include 48c stamp. 



v* Reader Serv/ce— see page 146 



73 Magazine ■ February, 1981 125 



gm\z 



elcctroqic$ 



Toll Free Number 

800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



190O MHz to 25O0 MHz DOWN CONVERTER 

This receiver is tun.ihhr a range ol 1900 to 2500 mc and is intended for amateur radio use The local oscillator is voltage controrted ii ej making the »-l range appro* i ma I el v 54 

to 68 mc (Channels 2 to 7} 

PC BOARD WITH DATA ...Sig.99 

PC BOARD WITH CHIP CAPACITORS 1 3 . S44 99 

PC BOARD WITH ALL PARTS FOR ASSEMBLY $69.99 

PC BOARD WITH ALL PARTS FOR ASSEMBLY PLUS 2N6603 589.00 

PC BOARD ASSEMBLED AND TESTED .. .. S99 99 

PC BOARD WITH ALL PARTS FOR ASSEMBLY. POWER SUPPLY AND ANTENNA & -59 99 

POWER SUPPLY ASSEMBLED AND TESTED S49 99 

VAGI ANTENNA 4 LONG APPROX 20 TO 23 dB GAIN 54 9 99 

YAGI ANTENNA 4 WITH TYPE ^N,BNC,SMA Connector) . 564,99 

I FOOT DISH WITH FEED AND MOUNT $59.99 
2300 MH2 DOWN CONVERTER 

Includes converter mounted in antenna, power supply. Plus 90 DAY WARRANTY . -•♦..« .$259 09 

OPTION #1 MHF902 in front end. (7 dB noise figure) . , ■. . - . ■ ,.,.,,$299.99 

OPTION #2 2N6B03 In front end <5dB noise figure) . ..$359.99 

2300 MH^ DOWN CONVERTER ONLY 

to dB Noise Figure 53 dB gain in tmx wiiN N conn tnpulFconn Output SI 49. 99 

7dB Noise Ftgufe 23 dB gam in box *nh N conn Input F conn Output £169 99 

5 dB Noise Figure 23 dB gam m box with SMA conn Input F conn Output $18999 

DATA 15 INCLUDED WtTHKHSOR MAY BE PURCHASED SEPARATELY S15 00 

Shipping and Handling Cost 

Receiver Kits and Si SO. Power Supply add £2 00 Antenna add S5 00. Op1*o« i.'2 arid S3 00. for complete system add $7 50 



HOWARD/COLEMAN TVRO CIRCUIT BOARDS 

DUAL CONVERSION BOARD .$2500 

This board provides conversion from the3.7 4.2Dand first to 900 MHz where gam and bandpass h I termg are provided and, second, to 70 MHz The board contains both local 

oscillators, one fixed and the ol her . ie, and the sucond mixer Construction is greatly simplified by the use of Hybrid IC ampli hers for the gam stages Bare boards cost 

$25 and it <s estimated thai parts tor construction wrll cost $270. (Note The two AvanteH VTOs account tor $225 ol this cost. I 

47 pF CHIP CAPACITORS *6.00 

For use win dual conversion board Consists ol 6 4/ pF 

70 MHz IF BOARD S25 00 

Th*s circuit provides about 43 dB gam with 50 ohm input and output impedance it is designed to drive the HQW A RD'COLEM AN TVRO Demodulator The on board band 

pass Ftftei can &e tuned tor baridwidlhs between 20 and 35 MHz with a passband ripple ot less ihan '-j dB Hybrid ICs are used tor the gam stages Bare boards cost S25 It is 

estimated that parts lor construction will cost less than S4Q 

01 pF CHIP CAPACITORS *? 00 

For use with 70 MHz IF Board Consists o! 7-01 pF 

DEMODULATOR BOARD $40 00 

This circuit Takes the 70 MHz center frequency satellite TV signals m the tQ to 200 mriiwoir range, detects ihem using a phase locked loop, deemphast/es and fitters the 

result and amplrhes the result to produce standard NTSC video. Other outputs include the audio subcarner. a DC voltage proporlional to Ihe strenglh of the 70 MHz signal. 

and AFC voltage centered al about 2 volts DC The bare board cosi $40 and total parts cosi less than $30 

SINGLE AUDIO ^ 1 5.00 

This circuit recovers the audio signals trom the 6 ft MH/ frequency Thn Miller 9051 coils are luned lo pass the 6 B MHz subcamerand the Miller 9052 cqH lunes lor recovery 

or the audio 

DUAL AUDIO $25.00 

Duplicate ol the single audio but also covers the 6 2 range 

DC CONTROL S^OO 

This circuit consols the VTO's. AFC and the S Meter 



TERMS: 

WE REGRET WE NO LONGER ACCEPT BANK CARDS. 

PLEASE SEND POSTAL MONEY ORDER. CERTIFIED CHECK. CASHIER'S CHECK QR MONEY ORDER. 
PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE: WITHOUT NOTICE WE CHARGE 15°'« FOR RESTOCKING ON ANY ORDER 

ALL CHECKS AND MONEY ORDERS IN US FUNDS ONLY 

ALL ORDERS SENT FIRST CLASS OR UPS 

ALL PARTS PRIME AND GUARANTEED 

WE WILL ACCEPT COD ORDERS FOR S2540 OR OVER. ADD 5-2.50 FOR COD CHARGE 

PLEASE INCLUDE $2 50 MINIMUM FOR SHIPPING OR CALL FOR CHARGES 

WE ALSO ARE LOOKING FOR NEW AND USED TUBES, 
TEST EQUIPMENT COMPONENETS ETC 

WE ALSO SWAP OR TRADE 



FOR CATALOG SEE JANUARY i960 73 Magazine, 10 Pages 



(602) 242-8916 

2111 W. Camelback 
Phoenix, Arizona 85015 



126 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



<gm[L 



elect 



FAIRCHILD VHF 

95H90OC 
95H91DC 
HC90DC 
HC910C 
11C83DC 

ncmoc 

1TC58DC 

11C44DOWC4044 

HC24DOMC4024 

11C06DC 

11C05OC 

11C01FC 



AND UHF PRESCALER CHIPS 

350 MHz Pf ©seal or Divide by 10/11 

350 MH* Prescalar Divide by 5/6 

650 *AHz Prescalar Divide by 10/11 

650 MHz Prescaier Qivide by 5/6 

1 GHz Divide by 248/256 Prescaier 

600 MHz Rip/ Flop with reset 

ECL VCM 

Phase Frequency Deiector 

Dual TTL VCM 

UHF PrescaJer 750 MHz D Type Flip/Ftop 

i GH^ Counter Divide by 4 

High Speed Dual 5-4 input NONOR Gate 



S9 50 

9 50 

1650 

16.50 

29 90 

1230 

453 

382 

182 

12,30 

5000 

15.40 



TRW BROADBAND AMPLIFIER MODEL CA615B 

Frequency response 40 MHz to 300 MHz 
Gam: 3O0MH/i6dBMin . 17 SdBMax 

50 MH? to - 1 dB from 300 MHz 
Vol tage 24 vo Its dc a r 220 ma max 

CARBIDE - CIRCUIT BOARD DRILL BITS FOR PC BOARDS 

Size 35, 42. 47, 49.5 V 52 

Size: 53, 54. 55, 56. 57. 58. 59, 61. 63. 64. §5 

Size 66 

Size 1 25 mm. T 45 mm 

S*ze 3 20 mm 



$1998 



12.15 
186 
190 
2.00 

358 



CRYSTAL FILTERS: TYCO 001-1 9ftfl0 same as 2194F 

10,7 MHz Narrow Band Crystal Filter 

3 dB bandwidth 15 kHz mm. 20 dB bandwidth 60 kHz mhr 40 dB bandwidth ISO 

kHz min. 
UllimaieSOdfl: Insertion loss 10 dB max Ripple 10 dB max, Ct + /- 5 pi 3600 

ohms. S5.95 

MURATA CERAMIC FILTERS 

Models SFD-455D 455 kHz S3 00 

SFB455D455kHr 2 00 

CFM455E455hH2 7 95 

SFE-10 7 10 7 MHz 5 95 



TEST EQUIPMENT — HEWLETT PACKARD - TEKTRONIX — ETC, 

Hewlett Packard 

491C TWT Amplifier 2 to 4 Gc 1 watt 30 dB gain S1 150 00 

608C 10 rnc to 480 mc 1 uV to.5V into 50 ohms Signal Generator 500.00 

6QBD 10 to 420 mc .1 uV to.SV into 50 ohms Signal Generator 500.00 

612A 450 to 1230 mc .1 uV lo .5V Into 50 ohms Signal Generator 750.00 

614A 900 to 2100 mc Signal Generator 500.00 

616A 1.8 lo 4.2 Gc Signal Generator 400 00 

616B Ij8 to 4.2 Gc Signal Generator 500 00 

618A 3,8 to 7.2 Gc Signal Generator 400 00 

618B 3,8 to 7.2 Gc Signal Generator 50000 

620A 7 to 11 Gc Signal Generator 50000 

623 B Microwave Test Set 900 00 

626A to Gc to 15 Gc Signal Generator 2500.00 

695A f 2.4 to 18 Gc Sweep Generator 900.00 

Alttecti: 

473 225 to 400 mc AM/FM Signal Generator 750 00 

Singer: 

MF5/VR4 Universal Spectrum Analyzer with i kHi to 27 5 mc Plug In 1200.00 

Kahak: 

XR630 100 TWT Amplifier to 12.4 Gc 100 watts 40 dB gam 9200.00 

Pol* rid; 

2038/243671 102 A 

Calibrated Display with an SSB Analysis Module and a 10 lo 

40 mc S* Jig l e Tone Sy n t hes i /er 1 500 00 



HAMLIN SOLID STATE RELAYS: 
t20vac at 40 Amps 
input Voltage 3 to 32vdc 

240 vac at 40 Amps 
Input Voltage 3 to 32 vdc. 



RF TRANSISTORS 

TYPE PRICE 

2N1561 S15.00 

2N1562 15 00 

2IM1692 15 00 

2N1693 15 00 

2N2632 4500 

2ISI2857JAN 252 

2N2876 12.35 

2N2880 2500 

2N2927 7.00 

2N2947 1&35 

2N2948 1550 

2N2949 3.90 

2N2950 500 

2N32B7 4 30 

2N3294 1.15 

2N3301 1.04 

2N3302 1.05 

2N3304 1.48 

2N3307 12,60 

2N3309 3.90 

2N3375 9.32 

2N3553 1ST 

2N3755 7,20 

2N3818 600 

2N3866 1.09 

2N3866JAM 2 80 

2N3866JANTX 4.49 

2N3924 3.3* 

2(43927 12 10 

2N3950 26.86 

2N4072 1.80 

2N4135 2.00 

2N4261 14.60 

2N4427 1.20 

2N4957 3 62 

2N4958 2.92 

2N4959 2.23 

2N4976 1900 

2N5090 12 31 

2N5108 4 03 

2N5109 1.66 

2N5160 3 49 

2N5179 105 

2N5134 2.00 

2N5216 4750 

2 IMS 583 4.55 

2N5589 682 



We can supply any 
value chip capac- 
itors you may need 

PRICES 



1 to to 
11-50 
51 - 100 
101 • 1,000 
1,001 up 



1,49 

1.29 

,89 

.69 

,49 



TYPE 

2N5590 

2N5591 

2N5637 

2N5641 

2N5642 

2M5643 

2N6545 

2N5764 

2N5842 

2N5849 

2 N 5662 

2145913 

2N5922 

2N5942 

2N5944 

2N5945 

2N5946 

2146080 

2N6081 

2N6082 

2N6083 
2N6084 

2N6094 
2N6096 
2N6096 
2N6097 
2N6136 
2N6166 



2N6439 
2N6459'PT9795 

2N6603 

2N6604 

A5012 

BFR90 

BLY568C 

BLV568CF 

CD3495 

HEP7cvS3014 

HEPS3002 

HEPS3003 

HEPS3005 

HEPS3006 

HEPS 3007 

HEPS3010 

HEPS5026 

HP35fi3lEi 

HXTR5104 

MM1500 



Toll Free Number 

800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



PRICE 
18 15 
1185 
22 15 

6 00 
1005 
1582 
12 38 
27 00 

8.78 
2129 
51 91 

325 
1000 
46 0O 

8,92 
12.38 
1469 

7 74 
10.05 
11 30 
1323 
14 66 

7,15 
11 77 
20 77 
29 54 
20 15 
38 60 



45,77 
1800 
12.00 
12.00 
2500 

500 
2500 
2500 
1500 

4 95 
1130 
29 88 

S.95 
19,90 
24 95 
11 34 

2.56 

50.00 
32.20 



CHIP CAPACITORS 

ipf 27pf 

150' 33pf 

22pf 39p1 

2 7pf 47pf 

3.3pf 56of 

39p1 68of 

4.7pf 82pr 

5.6pf lOOpt 

6.6pl HOpf 

82pf l20pt 

lOpf 130pt 

12pf 150pf 

I5pf I60p1 

ISpf 180p1 

22p* 200pf 



TYPE PRICE 

MM1550 £10.00 

MM 155? 50.00 

MM1553 6650 

MM1601 550 

MM1602 2N5842 7 50 

MM1607 865 

MM1661 1500 

MM 1669 17 50 

MM1943 300 

MM2605 300 

MM2608 500 

MM8006 2 23 

MMCM918 2000 

MMT72 1.17 

MMT74 1.17 

MMT2657 2,63 

MRF245 33 30 

MRF247 33.30 

MRF304 4345 

MRF420 2000 

MRF450 11.65 

MRF450A 1185 

MRF454 21 63 

MRF458 20 68 



MRF502 1,06 

MRF504 6.95 

MRFS09 4.90 

MRF511 8.15 

MRF901 3.00 

MRF5177 21.82 

MRFS004 160 

PT4186B 3.00 

PT4571A 1.50 

PT4612 5.00 

PT4828 500 

PT4640 500 

PT8659 10 72 

PT97S* 24.30 

PT9790 41.70 

SD1043 5.00 

S01116 3,00 

soma sot) 

SD1U9 3.00 



TRWMRA2023-1.5 42.50 

40281 10.90 

40282 1190 
40290 2.48 



220pt 
240pt 
270pt 
3O0p1 
330p! 
360p* 

390pr 

430pr 
470pf 
SlOpI 
560pl 
620pl 
680pt 
820pt 
1000pl 



I200pf 
I500pf 
18000' 
2200pf 
2700pl 
3300pf 
3900pf 
4700pf 
5600pf 
6800p1 
a200pf 
OlOmf 
0l2mf 
.015m* 
0l8mf 



YOUR CHOICE 14.99 



ATLAS CRYSTAL FILTERS FOR ATLAS HAM GEAR 

5 52 2 7/8 

5 59S2 m\J 

5 595 500/4/CW 

55952 ?LS6 YOUR CHOICE $24,95 

5.595-2- ?US& 

5.645 2 7^8 

9 OUSB/CW 



** Reader Service — see page f 46 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 t27 



® 



cctroqicy 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-01 80 
(For orders only) 



MOTOROLA Semiconductor 



Tlie RF Line 



MRF454 



$21.83 



MRF458 



$20.68 



NPIM SILICON RF POWER TRANSISTORS 



NPN SILICON RF POWER TRANSISTOR 



. . designed for power amplifier applications in industrial, com 
mercial and amateur radio equipment to 30 MHi. 



Specified t2 5 Volt, 30 MH* Charade* istics 

Output Power 80 Wat If 
Minimum Gain = 12 dB 
Efficiency ■ 50% 



MRF472 



$2.50 




designed for power amplifier applications m industrial, 
comment: al aiuf jmjteu' 'ad hi equ^mpni w 30 MH/ 

* Specified 17 5 Voli. 30 MH/ Characteristics 

Oui put Power 80 Watts 
Minimum Gam ~ 1 2 dB 

Eftu:iiMu:v 50% 

■ Capable ol Withstanding 30 I L0«*VSWR C°* Rattwi P nu , and Vcc 



NPN SILICON RF POWER TRANSISTOR 

designed primarily for use m large- vgnal output amplifier stages 
Intended for use «n Citizen Band communications eqtnp/neni 
operating at 27 MH2. Htgfi breakdown voltages allow a high 
percentage of up modulation m AM circuits 

• Specified 12 5 V, 27 MHr Characteristics - 
Power Outpul = 4.0 Watts 
Power Gam - 10 dB Minimum 

Efficiency = 65% Typical 




MRF475 




55.00 



NPN SILICON RF POWER TRANSISTOR 

designed primarily for use in single sideband linear amplifier 
output applications in citizens band and othet communications 
equipment operating to 30 MH* 

• Characterized for Single $*deband and Large Signal Am pit her 

Applications Utilizing Low Level Modulation. 

• Specified 13.6 V, 30 MHz Characteristics - 

Output Power- 12 W (PEP) 
Minimum Efficiency ■ 40% (SSB) 
Output Power = 4 W ICWJ 
Minimum Efficiency - 50% {CW| 
Minimum Power Gain ■ IQdB (PEP & CWI 

• Common Collector Characterization 



MHW710 



- 2 



$46.-45 
440 to 470MC 
UHF POWER AMPLIFIER MODULE 



destgned for 12 5 volt UHF power amplifier application 
industrial and commercial FM equipment operating Irorn 400 
to 512 MH/ 

• Specified 12 5 Volt. UHF Chaiactensnc* 

Output Power - 13 Watts 

Minimum Gam z 19.4 dS 
Harmonics 40 dB 

• 50 Ll fnput/Output Impedance 

• Guaranteed Stability and Ruggedness 

• Gain Control Pin for Manual or Automatic Output Level Control 

• Thm Film Hybrid Cons true I ion Gives Consistent PtfrlarmancH 

and Reliability 




Tektronix Test Equipment 

S Ji.lf-lMIILl Hlfh i^'Tl t'luu In 

C* Hutt Trju 1 Plug In 

i F«t k i '■ p uc Piuf In 

n n»»i|jl»nij ^i-.ij In 

R TmfttlUCir JM-iHtime l"l,j| \n 

m High fiJiHi UlftiTHni ih I lA.it i>,m .t r iii Hug Ln 

tU-? TuV |.i,i,l I'li^; In Fnr 51 *,U< h 

\W. ufdfbitnd piwl TraiF riu,.} ]r 

IS* Sn"H""] Unit Hit*! i^Cfi (riv-lim DC Ul ] 

2*61 AC Dirfervnttjl flu3 In 

JS3 Puil lrtf.it $**pli»3 DC Id \mi flu4 Ir 

B7f Dull Jtur V«eh*g DC tip 1'WJ flu4 !* 

S.10 *i*C«.tr^ Wlj«r 1 to JMttf Pl«« 1* 

**lirirr fTn: 

H 5«*t«fi H#j > 

5M tfl**«n4 nifS «•*■ P[«f In 

I Hwt wi** &ji* Flop In 

53;54f. Dm! TriC* M^ In 

53 MD wig* (km U liiffwreniut Pluq 1* 

53/5*0 Mlfrbind DC ptfirr*MT«l Hug ll 

53/5*1. Flit Hivr High Sain Plug In 

M Tt*i J lug lufflf i r«« 

JOI Vqojrf HiV< teiwratnr .4 tn SHI/ 

RMSZ2 Prrai«fllf i«r irtz tn 4QKH/ 

|£j AC Cu«ril«l Prn««p1if -ht 

\ti Curr#nt I 1 rube Amplifier 

\M Tim* M. frator 

R240 Program ConLrol Unit 

260 I > i|-,-'i • =m ■'•iumn Unit 

*6? PrtrUttli' QujI TrdCt SQ**U V-.vu*- 

4&S Pvrtiblk Dml Trie* lOOmj Vcw 

Ml DC Ur 4KKK2 Scope R?^ Kwinl, 

«■ DC lo SVliT ic*w* X*cl l^t 

441 DC U> 1 *W $cih* 

»] DC U 10K2 iiap* IkI fteHl 



1^)00 

• DO 

Jlf. ii- 
iio 
Hi' 

?so no 
m oo 
?w oo 

tOtt.QO 

y>-flo 
so.oo 

K,0O 
00 

m.u 

38 00 
00 

64.00 
00 

J 5, OH 
|& II 
ISO 

M.U0 
MOO. 00 
^V>! 00 

?»,[» 

00 
HO. 00 
IV). no 

rt».on 



Scopes with Plug -ins 



M,|ft li' '■■■ "1ii. ■ U, in in I. 

H??iMH/ 'nH«|il ini| i'Ljij In nnd h 1 1 /.'/i iwt'i n I'lij'i In. R,n I Hn.in1 

DC ta ]{M\i lliwl Hi'dlH WQW *irh | ;7.M :.M ,mi.| $ .Wi| D>*ff . 
clug In' 

vm DC in WH'l amst «tlh ■ W Lki*l tr« L r khjh- '«»Mi 



Tubes 





1 


. 


-O0 










WO 






;*B.0ri 




00 








. 








k'A.OO 


J 




4. ||J| 




30 


*t: 


41.00 


4 ^' 






tiive 


B 




. 




a* 


t*.-*G 


?n 


l iUiVA 






in 








,. 


i 




■ '.iifJi* 




K Ob 


i 


H|M 




1,'. 


811A 


li 


M1V 


.!■ 1 'Ml /fi 


<r, 


HL 1 


' 


' 


■ 


1 1 


5 rl'J T , A 


4? 






■ 


6J 


^,;ll' 


■ 






■ 


1 


■ 


' '>0A 




itt/ll/iMA 


7.00 


* l , l<*' 



I7i7 



rillll. I Hi 



44.00 
K.rt 

II 



128 73 Magazine • February, 1981 






MICROWAVE COMPONENTS 



COMPUTER I.C. SPECIALS 



ARRA 



2416 

3*14-60 

WJ520A 

*6»4-20F 




Variable 
Variable 
Variable 
Variable 

Vdrfdbit 


Attenuator 
Attenuator 
Attenuator 
Attenuator 
Attenuator 



IE 
D 



to 60d6 
to 26. S 

to ISOdB 
to iSOdB 


Genera 


i rv 


licrowave 









GHz 



Directional Coupler 2 to 4(ihtt ^OCB Type N 

Hewlett Packard 



H487B 

H487B 

477B 
*4B7A 

X4B78 



J468A 
4 78A 



I in* Vi 



100 ohvri5 Ke^ Thermistor Moum 
100 OhmS Mejg Thermistor Mount 
200 Ohms Net} Thermistor Mount 
100 ohm Hei Thermistor Mount 
100 onns Heft, Thermistor Mount 



(MM) 

fusto) 

(USED) 
(USED) 
(USED) 





MEMORY 


DESCRIPTION 


50.00 






75.00 


2708 


U * 8 EPSOM 


100.00 


2716/2516 


2K * fl EPSON SVolt Single Supply 


100.00 


2114/9114 


IK % 4 Static RAH 4&Gn* 


100.00 


2U4L2 


IK x 4 Static RAH 2bQns 




2114L3 


IK » 4 Static RAM J50ni 




4027 


4K Jt 1 Dynamic: RAM 




4060/2107 


4K * I Dynamic RAM 


75-00 


4050/9050 


4K a [ Dynamic RAM 


2111A-2/H111 


256 x 4 Static RAM 




211ZA-2 


256 % 4 Static RAM 




21I5AL-Z 


U x 1 Static RAM &6ns 




6104-3/4104 


4K * 1 Static RAM 320m 


150<00 
100,00 


7141-5 


4K x 1 Static RAM 200ns 


MXH6MIL2Q 


4K * 2 Static RAM 200n* 


9131 


IK a 1 Static RAM JOOn* 



!A 



H436A 



8439A 

B471A 

H532A 
G53M 
J532A 



100 ohms He* Thermistor Mount (USED I 
200 oftas Htq Thermistor Mount (USED) 

5. dS to 8.2 (Hz Variable Attenuator to SQdB 
8.2 to 12.4 tmi Variable Attestor t© 50d6 



1 to 2 GKf Variable Attenuator 6 to 120d& 

Waveguide Adapter 

18 to 26. S CHf Crystal Detector 

Bandpass Filter 8 to 12.4 GHz 



2 GHz Notch Filter 
RF Detector 

7.05 to 10 GHl Frequency Meter 
3,95 to 5.05 GH; Frequency Meter 
5.85 to ft. 2 GH? frequency Meter 



j 00. 00 
125,00 

150,00 
150.00 

250\QO 
250-00 



ZSO 00 

65.00 

250.00 

75,00 



75.00 
50,00 

300.00 
300.00 
300O0 



Carriage with a M4A Slotted Line Untied Detector Probe 

and 8098 Co*iiaV Slotted Section 2.6 to 18 &Hj: 175.00 



Merrimac 



- 26A t 



B01115 Variable Attenuator 
901162 Variable Attenuator 



100.00 
100.00 



Microlab/FXR 



(I Lgs 
601 -81B 

T610D 



Narda 



4013C-10/ 

4014-10/ 

4014C-6/ 

40I5C-10/ 

4O15C-30/ 

3044-20 

3040-20 

3043-20/ 
3003-10/ 
3003-30/ 

3043-30/ 
22574 

3033 
3032 

784/ 

223/? 
72Q-6 
1503 



PRD 

uioi 

X10I 

C10I 

205A/367 

1958 

185851 

196C 

1701 

S88A 

UoA.t.D.E 

I09J t I 

WUNSCHEL ENG. 



Horn b.2 - 12,4 GHz 

X to N Adapter BJ - 12.4 GH* 

Coupler 



60,00 
35.00 

?5.00 



225*0* Directional Coupler 2 to 4 GH* lOdb Type SMA 

22538 OirectiOMl Coupler 3.85 to 8 GHi 1048 Type SMA 
22878 Direct io^aI Coupler 3.85 to 8 £H* 6dB Type SHA 

22539 Direction*! Coupler 7.4 to 12 Oil 10dS Type SMA 
23105 Directional Coupler J to 12.4 GHz 30dB Type SMA 
Directional Coupler 4 to 8 Oil 20d& Type N 
DiretitonaV Coupler 240 to 500 MC 20<t& Type H 

22006 Directional Coupler 1.7 to 4 GHZ 20dB Type « 

22011 Directional Coupler 2 to 4 GHz lOdB Type N 

22012 Directional Coupler 2 to 4 GHz 30d& Type N 

22Q07 Directional Coupler 1.7 to 3.5 GHz 30dB Type N 

Directional Coupler 2 to 4 GHz lOdB Type N 

Coaxial Hybrid 2 to 4 GHz 3dB Type N 

Coaxial Hybrid 950 to 2 GHz 3 dB Type N 

22380 Variable Attenuator 1 to 90dB 2 to 2.5 GHz Type SMA 

Waveguide to Type H Adapter 

Fined Attenuator B.2 to 14,4 GHz 6 dB 

Waveguide 



90.00 
90.00 
90.00 
95.00 
95,00 
125-00 
125.00 

125.00 
75,00 
75.00 

125,00 

125.00 

125,00 

125.00 

550.00 

35,00 

50.00 

25.00 



12.4 to 18 GH* variable Attenuator to 60d6 

8,2 to 12.4 GHz Variable Attenuator to 60d& 

Variable Attenuator to 60d8 

Slotted line tilth Type H Adapter 

8.2 to 12,4 &H*' Variable Attenuator to 50dB 

7.05 to 10 GHZ Variable Attenuator to *0tfS 

8,2 to 12*4 Qix Vtrirtle Attenuator Q to 45dB 

3.95 to 5.85 GHz Variable Attenuator to 4548 

Frequency Meter 5-3 to 6.7 GHz 

fijied Attenuators 

Fi^ed Attenuators 

26S2 Variable Attenuator +30 to 5048 



3OO.00 
200.00 
200.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 

too.oo 

25,00 

25.00 

100.00 



CRU. s EOT, 



MC&aOOL 

MCM6&10AP 

MCM68A10P 

MCM68110P 

MC6820P 

MC 68201 

MC&B21P 

MC68B21r 

MCM6830L7 

MCoH40P 

MC684 5P 

MC6845L 

MC68S0L 

MC6852P 

MC68S2L 

MC6854P 

MC&&&GCJCS 

MC6862L 

WJ50H-3 
MK3852P 
»" 3852H 
MK3854)! 

8008-1 

- - z 

ZSOCPU 

6520 

6530 

2650 

TrtSlOOOhX 

TMS4024\ 

fSBOHHC 
MCI 44 11 
AY 5- 4 007 D 
AY 5- 0,200 
AY5-9100 
AY5-237G 
AY 1 -85 00 
TR1402A 
PR1472B 
PT1482B 
8257 
8251 
8228 
8212 

MC14410CP 
MC144I2 
MCI4406 
MC14409 
MC148SL 
MC14S9L 
MCH05L 
MC14C6L 
MC 1408/6/7/8 
MU33QP 
MCI 349/50 
MC1733L 

LM565 



Mitroprocessor 



8 
8 
8 



Static 

Static 
Static 



RAM 450m 
f AN 360ns 
RAM 250m 



IZ8 
128 
128 
P1A 
P1A 

P1A 
PIA 

MUbug 
PtM 

CRT Controller 
CRT Controller 
ACtA 



SSOA 

DA 
ADLC 

0-600 BPS Modem 
2400 BPS Modem 
FB Microprocessor 
F8 Memory Interface 
FB Memory Interface 
FB Direct Memory Access 
" *-oprove5Sor 
MtcrtSfprocessor 
Microprocessor 
PU 

Support For 6500 series 
Microprocessor 
Four Bit Microprocessor 
9 i 64 Digital Storage Buffer IFIFO) 
UAUT 

Hit Pate Generator 
Four Digit Counter/Display Drivers 
Repertory Dial ler 
Push Button Telephone Diallers 
Keyboard Encoder 
TV Game Chip 
UART 
UART 
UAfiT 

DMA Controller 
Communication Interface 
Systen Controller a Bus Drrver 
8 Bit In put/ Output Port 
2 of 8 Tone Encoder 
Low Speed Modes 

Binary to Phone Puis* Converter 
Binary to Phone Pulse Con»frter 
R5232 Driver 
RS232 Piece Twer 
A/0 Converter Subsystem 
6 Sit D/A Converter 
8 Bit 0/A Converter 
tow Level Video Detector 
Video IF Anfjlifier 
LM733 OP Amplifier 

Phase Lozk Loop 



r^VFHz 



^48 



PRICE 



S 7-99 

20.00 

6.99 

6.99 

7.99 

3,99 

3,95 

3.99 

3.99 

3,99 

4,99 

14.99 

14.99 

14 99 

10.99 



13,80 

99 

4,99 

5.99 

8.99 

99 

8.99 

9.99 

14,99 

8,99 

29,50 

33.110 

10.99 

5 + 99 

11.99 

12 . 00 

29.00 

14.99 

9 99 

16.99 

9.99 

9.99 

i.99 

8.99 

14.99 

7.99 

15.99 

10.99 

9.99 

9.99 

9-99 

11.99 

8.99 

9.99 

7.99 
1999 
S.99 
9.99 
9,99 
9.99 
9.99 
9.99 
5.00 
5.0D 
9.99 
14.99 
12.99 
J2.99 
1.00 
1.00 
9.00 
7.50 
4.50 
1.50 
1.17 
2*40 
2.50 



^-** eiectroi|ic§ 

Toll Free Number 



800-528-01 80 

(For orders only) 



(602)242-8916 

2111 W.Camelback 
Phoenix, Arizona 85015 



** Reader Service— see page 146 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 129 



RAMSEY 
ELECTRONICS 
.-« inc. 



PARTS WAREHOUSE 



We now have avaifable a bunch of goodies too 
good to bypass Hems are limited so order ion 



2575 Baird Rd, 

Penfield, NY 14526 

7165863950 



MINI KITS - YOU HAVE SEEN THESE BEFORE NOW 

HERE ARE OLD FAVORITE AND NEW ONES TOO. 

GREAT FOR THAT AFTERNOON HOBBY. 



FM 

MINI 

MIKE 




A super high performance FM wire- 
less mike kiv Transmits a stable 
signal up 10 300 yards with excep- 
tional audio qualify by means of its 

built In elect ret mike. KM includes 
case, mike on-ofl switch, antenna, 
natipry and supttf m&truc lions This 
is ihe linest unit available 

FM-3 KM Sli.BS 

FM-3 Wired and Tested 19.95 




FM Wlrelett Mike Kit 

Transmits up lo 300 to 
any FM broadcast ra- 
dio, uses any type of 
mike Runs oti 3 to 9V Type FM-2 
has added sensitive mpke preamp 
stage 

FM-t hut S3 95 FM 2 kit |4.95 



Color Organ 

See music come 
ahve' 3 different 
Irgr^ts (iicHer wiih 
music One light 
each tor. high 
mtd-range and 
lows Each indi- 
vidually adjust- 
able and drives up 
to 300 W runs on 
110 VAC. 

Complete kil, 

ML-1 
$8.95 



video Modulate* xh 
Con*ii Wi TV To video monitor Super 
ititMe runatMe o*e* crv *-S Rum on 5- 
15V accept sid video *Ȥnn Bait unit on 
We m»rt?!' CovnpkffV Hit VD-t ffjf 



Led Slinky KM 
A great attention get- 
ter which alternately 
flashes 2 jumbo LEDs 
Use for name badges, 
buiions. warning 
panef lights, Brrylhing^ 
Runs on 3 to 15 volts 
Complete kit, BL-1 
$2.95 




Super Sleuth 
A super sensitive ampli- 
fier which will pick up a 
ptn ijmp at 15 ieet f Great 
tpr monitonng baby's 
room or as general pur- 
pose amplifier Full 2 W 
rrns output runs Oh 6 to 
15 votts uses 8-45 ohm 
speaker 
Complete kit. BN-9 

15.06 



CPO-1 

Runs on 3-12 Vdc l wall out. 1 KHZ good forCPO. 

Alarm. Audio Oscillator Complete kil $3.95 



WMtper Light Kit 

An intetesttng kit small mike 
picks up sounds and converts 
them io lighi The Eoudet the 
sound, the brighter the light 
Includes mike, controls up to 
300 W. runs on HO VAC 
Complete kit WL-1 
S0JS 




Ton* Decoder 
A complete tone deco- 
der on a single PC 
board Features 400- 
5000 Hi adjustable 
range via 20 lurn pot voyage regu- 
lation 567 IC Useful for touch- 
lone burst detection FSK etc 
Can also be used as a stable tone 
encoder Runs or* 5 to 12 vOfts 
Complete kil TD-1 $5 95 




Call Your Phone Order *n Today 
TERMS: Satisfaction guaranteed or money 
refunded, COD add 5200 Minimum order 
S6 00 Orders under S 10 00 add S t 50 Add" 5 
for postage, insurance handling Overseas 
add i5 r N ¥ residents add 7 4 , fa* 



CLOCK KITS 

Tour old favontri art her* ey>in Over 7.004 Sotd to Date 
Be one ot m# gang and order youri today 1 

Try your hand at building the finest looking clock on the 
market Its sattn finish anodized aluminum case looks great 
an/where while six 4" LED digits provide a highly readable 
display This is a complete kit, no extras needed, and it only 
takes 1-2 hours to assemble. Your choice of case colors 
silver, gold, black (specify) 

Clock kit, 12/24 hour. DC-5 S24.9S 

Clock with 10 mm ID timer. 12/24 hour, DC-10 $29.95 

Alarm clock, 12 hour only. DC-8 $29.95 

12V DC car clock, DC-7 $29.95 

For wired and tested clocks add Si 00 to kit price. 

SPECIFY 12 OR 24 HOUR FORMAT 



Car Clock 

The UN- KIT, only 5 bolder connections 



Hore a a iup#r looMnq rugged and accurate auto doc* *n,cr ,» t snap to tuiitf And 
■nglall Clock movement if rnrnplpteiy suembMnJ — fO/U only K)l*J» |r 1 wiFir* <*nd 2 
swwilcftM Edhes about IS "imuteV PispJay is bright qtpp" «<tri aulbrnatit br»ohine*f 
control photocell sniu'** you ot 4 ^ig^ky readable d-spia/ Jlfly dp 1 Pn)tTt Com*** m a 
Mil" tiFirjh ar*v<Jij*i.1 aluminum cinmutiict? can t» a TTac^e^t *idaft*'prtt way* uiifrQ 2 SidX) 
rape Choice ot *r»pir tUAc*. or gold ease iso#c 

DC -3 ** i2 nou* format 
DC -3 ■<t#d and Tefied 






Outre mi Tinier Kil 

Pfo*«*es ihe banc parts arvd PC 
board required to provide a source 
q4 precision timing and pulse 
generation Uses 555 rimer IC and 
includes a range ol pans for mosi 
timing need* 

UT-S Kit 15 ?5 



Mad Blaster KM 

Produces LOUD ear shattering and 
attention getting *iren like sound 
Can supply up to IS watts ol 
o&ngmou* HJ*0 Run* On 6- 1 5 VDC 



Siren Kit 
Produces upward and downward 
wail characteristic of • pot ice 
siren 5 W peak audio output runs 
on 3-15 volts uses 3-45 ohm 

speaker 

Complete kit. SM-3 S2 95 



C Jif nd*r Alarm Clock 
The clock that s goi ij all ft- S" L£Ds. 
12 24 nour snoo/e 24 hour aJarm 4 
year caJendar t>aif*»f * backup and 
lots more The super 7001 chip rs 
used 5>je 5^4*2 inchts Comp*eie 
kn less case [not avail it>ie> 
QC-S S3495 



Under Oath Ca' Clock 
fi T**m *£D Ltos »^t mcvkt i aoi%t 




DC *i ?*XM 

QUI 

Add 1*0 00 *»• t/ntt T*tl 



MB-1 Kit 



S4 95 



min mqnm «»„'*? T tfi "■...! IS SO 



PARTS PARADE 



»hh ittSfddi tflmpfcrlf co«npn**i 
*cc«m mai»r , f , « , « ***•#■ *SCii 



Video Terminal 

fnf^'« m 5-«oV> SV ii.f t . I T AL f O »i >ni <i ^wJ wc and baud 

Cftv fhr 14 ttfi** p<H> 



5.f 'D'iT-q i. CO* - vd Ht»** cms* iophomii mi} hxs rtS-?5t7 i"'T JOm* loop 

9* W>, *HPl1 A4td : 0^p<flf Ol"Mm»H***1A!l(V 

RE- '*■"*! r«><» i r lAdaiariOO k>f *.rwa un«T| 






. L '■ 



Hf ModnWr»r h.i 



9* on t»l«1I K**t 

liHSS 
III IS 

IKK 

tits 



IC SPECIALS 



LINEAR 



rs* 

MO 

hftV 

567 

74 t 

rasa 

5900 
3»14 



** 



I .35 

II so 
11.50 

t 45 

HOC 

tl.00 
11 M 
tt?5 
10 12 00 
i SO 
1 50 
t?i5 
I? 95 



TTL 



74SOO 

7447 
747S 

74M 
74136 



$ 40 
S 65 

$ .50 
$ .50 
il 35 



SPECIAL 



4011 
40U 
4040 



4Q« 

4511 

4»T| 



CMOS 



^0 



.50 
50 
Si 85 
.50 
$9 00 
S2 00 
*135 
1175 



READOUTS 
FMpjsa r cc ttet 

fNI>«-ISI0 !CA i« 

MAM ^HHtJO M'C * 1 04 

r# ?«i dC4 3 » 



TRANSISTORS 

949KMf#MC*f 1^*1 « 

?NJ«0$ PNPC'F 19/IUI 

?N«03*»N^cr l^tl.«Q 

?N44iewNC*F WH » 

7N4vl0ftf C'f *:tlW 

i-NS+oi ^np C'i irirw 

zNttoaac^F i7|t.0ft 

INJTn taPhl Simeon IVM 

ZMSireuHf uph 3.12 00 

Pew*f T»n npm 4inw 1, » t 00 

P^M4 TAb PNf «w jvi at 

mp* ioav3P#s*w t-Pt 

mpm aatH Typ* t - w wi: sa 

PNF 3t« Typ# T-n »UH 

7NVU IK 

2wa**uji i-uoa 



1IC90 

1 T 1 6 

7208 

7207A 

7216D 

7107C 

5314 

5375 A B/G 

7001 



S 15.00 
$ 1 25 
ST7.50 
S 5 50 
S2i 00 
S12.50 
I 2 95 
S 2 95 
S 6.50 



FERRITE BEADS 

* Hew ilatuR EtMdi tit « 



Socket! 

fi Pin 10/S2.00 

14 Pin 10/12.00 

16 Pin 10-12 00 

24 Pin 4 |2 00 

28 Pm 4'12 00 

40 Pm 3/12 00 



Diode* 

5 1 VZener 20/tl 00 

1N914Type 50/ Si 00 

IKV^Amp i/*1,00 

100V lAmp 15/J1.00 



25 AMP 

100V Bridge 

$1.50 each 

Mini -Bridge 50V 
1 AMP 

2 for S 1.00 



Reaialor Aas't 
Aftsorimftnl of Popular values ■ J&* 
w a tt Cu I lead to r P C mou nh no . '^ r ' 
CB-nter. W* leads, bao, ot 300 oj 
more 

SI .50 



Switches 

Mini toggle SPOT Si, 00 

Peri Pushbuttons N.O 3/S1.00 



Earphone* 

lead* ohm good for 5m.aU lone 
spurt* ers aidrm Cloc*F. eIc 

5 for $1. 00 



11 t ohrn 5p#»**r 
Appro ■ 2 . aiani dound 
if pe 'a* ffdXkS rmke etc 
i for 12 00 



CrrileJt 

3 579545 MMZ 11.50 

10.00000 MHZ S5 00 

524&RO0 MHZ $5 00 



AC Adapttr* 
0&a<l for dock 1 nicad 
chBrgvri^ll 110 VAC plug 
one end 
S 5 wdc (ft 20 mA f 1.00 

12 vie # 350mA jaoo 



Sold »!*«# >unfn 
small buuv 450 Hf tie dB sound 
output on 5-12 *dc «i iOs30 mA FTL 
comoatioie ttJO 



Slug Tuned Coift 
Smaii 3, I6r Hex Shjgs hjmect cr>* 
3turm 10 for S1, 00 



AC Outlel 
P*nel Mount *jth leaas 

4/ii.o© 



CAPACITORS 
TAMTALLH 

r>iep«j Ecc- a 
1.5uF25V3^ST.OO 

I 8 iif 25V 3^1 00 

II uF 25V 3^1.00 



loot uF isv r>Aom 
MCuF nvAn 

1»L*F ti6V Ai-#iS*1 00 



DUSK CERAHlC 

0i i»v a.i. Mil 00 

1 t»v 11 »' 00 

001 1«V » f 1 00 

wop* W If 00 

Ot? «W »tl DO 



OC-DC C<MTrtrl#r 

• 5 vdc mpui p*od % vdc (b< 30ma 
' i vdc OfO^uC OS- 15 vdc & 3? n-.a fi 25 



JSK 20 Turn Trim Frt fi 00 
' n 20 Turn Tf up Pot S 50 



Ceramic IF Fillers 

Mini ceramic titters 7 kHz 

B W 455kHz$l50ea 



IJE 



Spfigue - 3-40 pf 
STlbie PelypropYiefti 



Audio 
Prescaler 

Make high resolution audio 
measurments. great for musical 
instrument luniny. PL tones, etc. 
Multiplies audio UP in frequency, 
selectable xlD or kIOO, gives 01 
HZ resolution with \ sec gate 
time! High sensitivity of 25 mw 1 
meg input z and built-in filtering 
gives great performance Runs 
on 9V battery, all CMOS 
PS-2 kit 529.95 

PS-Z wired $39 95 



600 MHz 
PRESCALE 



B ET^ 



Extend the range of your 
counter to 600 MHz Works 
with ail counters. Less than 
150 mv sensitivity specify - 
10 or -100 

Wired, tested. PS- IB $59,95 
Kit. PS- IB $44.95 



30 Witt 2 mtr PWR AMP 

Simple Class C power amp features 8 times power gam 1 W in 
for 3 out. 2 Win lor 1 5 out 4W in for 30 out Max output of 35 W 
incrediote value, complete with all parts, less case and T*ft relay 
PA-1. 30 W pwr amp tit $22,95 

TR-1. RF sensed T-R relay kit 6.9S 



MRF-230 transistor as used *n PA-1 
3-iOdbgaiA ISO mhz f 11 95 



RF actuated relay senses RF 

(tW) and closes DPDT relay 

For RF sensed T-R relay 
TR-1 Kit $6,95 



Supply Kil 

Complete in pie regulated power 
supply provides var 130*0 6 to 16 votts at 
200 ma arvd "5 at 1 Amp Eice4ieni load 
requiation, good filtering ana small 

Sfffi Less iranslorrrpr* rpqu-re* 6 3 V 

f i1 A end 24 VCT 

Comptete kit PS-31T 14 95 



Crytlai Microphone 

Small I" diameter v -~ thic* 
crystal mike cartridge S,75 



Cmk Connector 

Chassis mount 

BNC type (1.00 



Mini RG-l74Coax 
10 trior 11.00 



• Volt «all«ry Clip* 
Nictt qutMty chpt % fpr ft 00 

W Rubbar Gramrrttll 10 tor 11.00 



PwfiBAg 
Axil ol chtHBi rtnc Caps lanE rn^HOri 
luirtiLtj.jft d.od« MIC*-cap4*lc 
•m b«0 i' 1< » pel »1 00 lg &ag 'TOD pe( |2 M 



Conmclora 
6 pin lypagoldconticls for 
mA-1003 c*r clock module 
prkcn 75 •■. 



Lads ■ your choice, please specify 

Mini Red, Jumbo Red. High Intensity Red. illuminator Red a/Si 

Mim Yellow. Jumbo Yellow. Jumbo Green fl^fl 



Yimctor* 

WDloro^i MV 2209 30 PF Nominal cap 20-AO Pf ■ Tunabla t »nqe 

•r 1/11 Jflj 



OP-AMP Special 
Bl-fETLF U741 -Direct pm for pm 741 compatible but 600 .000 MEG 
input i super low 50 pa inpui current, low power dram 
SO lor pflly |9 r tK) ir; t or HOC 



78MG 


1125 


79MG 


S1.2S 


723 


tso 


309 K 


11.15 


7B05 


11.00 



Ragulatom 



7612 
7615 
7905 
7912 
791& 



11.00 
II 00 
51.25 

$1.25 



Shrink Tubing Nubi 

Mice pracul peas ot arirtnh sua Y\% '*"" 

shrink la i' Ore»l Tor lphC6t SO/ll.00 



Mini TO 92 Heat Slnki 
Tharmalloy Brand J tor tin 

To-220 H»l Si nit t i r / *l 00 



Opto Isolators - 4N28 type 
Opto Reflectors ■ Photo diode 



LED 



H 



$50 ea 

$1.00 ea. 



Pint 

MgtaR aaeapy pracul in hwqpn ot 1 f^ritd 
tor 14 pm sockait 20 Mrtpa lor |1 09 



CM 

Resislinca *art«s witn 
over 3 meo 



iigrti 



250 ohms to 
3 for II 44 



13<J 73 Magazine • February, 1961 



These Low Cost SSB 

TRANSMITTING 
CONVERTERS 

Let you use inexpensive recycled 
1 0M or 2M SSB exciters on UHF & VH F! 



Linear Converters for SSB. CW, FM, etc. 

A traction of the price of other units; no need to 

spend $300 - $400' 

Use with any exciter works with input levels as 

low as T mW. 

Use low power tap on exciter or simple resistor 

attenuator pad (instructions included l 

Link osc with fix converter Tor transceive 




XV4 UHF KIT— ONLY $99.95 

23-30 MHz in, 435-43? MHz out; 1 W pep. on sso. up to 
1%W on CVV or FM, Hes second oscillator for other 
ranges Atten suppled for 1 to 500 mW input, use 
external attenuator tor higher levels 

Extra crystal for 432*434 MHz range 55.95 

XV4 Wired and tested ...Si 49 95 

XV2 VHF KIT - ONLY $69.95 

2W p.e.p. output with as Jittfe as 1 mW input, Use simple 
external attenuator. Many free,, ranges available. 



MODEL 

XV2-1 
XV2-2 
XV2-4 
XV2-5 
XV2-7 



XV2 Wired and tested 



INPUT (MHz) OUTPUT (MHz) 

28*30 50-52 

25-30 220-222 

26 30 144-146 

2d-29 (27-27,4 CB) 145- 146 [144-1 44,4) 

144-146 50-52 

♦..♦S109.95 



XV28 2 M ADAPTER KIT -$24,95 

Converts any 2M exciter to provide the 10M signal 
required to drive above 220 or 435 MHz units. 




NEW! COMPLETE TRANSMITTING CONVERTER 
AND PA IN ATTRACTIVE CABINET 

Far less than the cost of many 10W units! 

Now, the popular Hamtronics* Transmitting Converters 
and heavy duty Linear Power Amplifiers are available as 
complete units in attractive, shielded cabinets with 9NC 
receptacles for exciter and antenna connections, Perfect 
setup for versatile terrestFal and OSCAR operations 1 Just 
nght for phase 3! You save $30 when you buy complete 
unit with cabinet under cost of individual items Run 
40-45 Watts on VHF or 30-40 Watts on UHF with one 
integrated unit! Call for more details 



MODEL 



KIT 



WIRED and 

TESTED 

XV2/LPA2-45/Caht (6M Of 2MJ £1 99.95 $299.95 

XWIFA4-3Q/Cabt (for UHF) $229.95 $349.95 



IT'S EASY TO ORDER! 



Easy to Build FET 

RECEIVING 
CONVERTERS 

Let you receive OSCAR and other 

exciting VHF and UHF signals on 

your present HF or 2M receiver 




• NEW LOW-ISJOISE DESIGN 

• ATTRACTIVE WOODGRAIN CASE 

• Less than 2d 8 noise figure, 2008 gam 

MODEL RF RANGE OUTPUT RANGE 



CA28 


28-32 MHz 


144-? 45 MHz 


CA50 


50-52 


28-30 


CA50-2 


50-54 


144-148 


CA144 


144-146 


28-30 


CA145 


145^147-or- 


28-30 




144-144,4 


27-27,4 (CB) 


CA146 


140-148 


28-30 


CA220 


22D-222 


28-30 


CA220-2 


220-224 


144-148 


CA110 


Any 2MHz of 


26-28 




Aircraft Band 


or 28-30 


CA432-2 


432-434 


28-30 


CA432-5 


435-437 


28*30 


CA432-4 


432-436 


144-145 


Easily 


modified for other rf and if ranges. 



STYLE 

Kit less case 
K<t with case 
Wired/Tested in case 



VHF 

£34 95 
£39.95 
*S4.95 



UHF 

S49.95 
£54.95 
$64 95 



Professional Quality VHF/UHF 

FM/CW EXCITERS 



• Fully shielded designs 

• Double tuned circuits for spurious suppression 

• Easy to align wrth built-in test aids 




T50-50 6-chan, 6M, 2W Kit $44.95 

T50-1 BQ 6-chan, 2M, 2W Kit. „ . , $44.95 

T50-220 6-chan. 220 MHz., 2W Kit $44,95 

T450 1-chan r 450 MHz. **W Kil $44.95 



See our Complete Line of 

VHF& UHF Linear PA's 



a Use as linear or class C PA 

# For use with SSB Xrotg Conveners, FM Exciters, etc, 



LPA2-15 6M, 2M, 220; 15to20W $59 95 

LPA2-30 6M, 2m, 25 to 30W , $89-95 

LPA2-40 220 MHz; 30 to 40W St 1 9.95 

LPA2-45 6M. 2tA: 40 to 45W 31 1995 

LPA4+10 430MHz; 10 to 1 4W $79.95 

LPA4-30 430MHz; 30-40W $11 9,95 



See catalog, for complete specifications 



^33 



• Write or pftone 716-392-9430 

(Electronic answering service evenings & weekends) 

• Use Credit Card. UPS COD, Check. Money Order 

• Add S2.00 shipping & handling per order 



CalJ or Write to get 

FREE CATALOG 

With Complete Details 

rSend * ifICi for o mm mailing) 



FAMOUS HAMTRONICS PREAMPS 

Let you hear the weak ones too! 

Great for OSCAR. SSB. FM. ATV Over 14.000 m 

use throughoul Ibe world on all types of receivers 




* ^ '"im 

nw.*,.,..,,.. b 



• NEW LOW-NOISE DESIGN 

• Less than 2 dB noise figure. 20 dB gain 

• Case only 2 inches square 

• Specify operating frequency when ordering 

MODEL P-30 VHF PREAMP, available in many versions 
to cover bands 18-300 MHz, 

MODEL P432 UHF PREAMP, available in versions to 
cover bands 300-650 MHz. 



STYLE 

Kit less case 
Kit with case 
wired/Tested in Case 



$12.95 
£18.95 
$27.95 



£18.95 
$26.95 
$32.95 



NEW VHF/UHF FM RCVRS 

Offer Unprecedented 
Range of Selectivity Options 



New generation 
More sensitive 
More selective 
Low cross mod 
Uses crystal filters 
Smaller 
Easy to align 




R75A* VHF Kii for momtor or weather salt el ft e service. 
Uses wide L-C Tiller. -60<fB at ± 30 kHz $69.95 

R75©* VHF Kit for nonroaJ ntarm service. Equivalent to most 
transceivers. -60d8at± 1 7 kHz, -80d8at ± 25kHz. . . $74 .95 

R75C* VHF Kit for repeater service or high rf density area. 
^Od8at±14kHz,-eOdB±22kHz.-100dB±30kH2. ... S&4.95 

R75D* VHF Kit for split channel operation or repeater In 
high density area. Uses 3-pole crystal filter. -60dB at 
±9 kHz,-1 OOdBat ± 1 5 kHz. The ultimate receiver? , - - $9995 

* Specify band: 1 0M. 6M , 2M, or 2 20 M Hz. May also be used 
lor adjacent cofrnnerctaf bands Use 2M version for 137 MHz 

WX satellites. 



R450f J UHF FM Receive* Kits, similar to R75. but for 
UHF band. New low-noise Front end. Add $10 to above 
(Add selectivity letter to model number as on R7&.) 



A14 5 Channel Adapter for Receive**. $995 



NEW R1 10 VHF AM RCVR 



AM monitor receiver kit similar to R75A, but AM. Available 
for 10-1 1 M. eivlSM, 220 MHz r and 1 10-130 MHz aircraft 
band $74.95. (Also available in UHF version.) 



am ironies, inc. 



MAMTROMICS' IS A flEGISTEHED TRADEMARK 65 J AflO(/L RD * HILTON, NY 14468 



t* Reader Service— s ee page 745 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 131 



2822 North 32nd Street, #1 • Phoenix, Arizona 85008 • Phone 602-956-9423 



MEMORY 

2708 
2716/2516 

2HV9114 

1*027 

2117A1I6 

2732-6 

C.P.U.'s. Etc. 

MC6800P 
MC68821P 

MC681+5P 

MC6850P 

MC6852P 

8008-1 

8080A 

Z80A 

Z80 
Z80A 
Z80 
z80 

8212 
8251 

TR1602/AY5-1013 

TMS1000NL 

PT1482B 

8257 

3341 

MM5316/F3817 
8741 

8748 

MC1408L/6 

C0M2502 

C0M26O1 



Descript ion 


Price 


IK x 8 Eprom 


$ 5-00 


2K x 8 5V single supply 


9.99 


IK x k Static 


5,00 


kK x 1 Dynami c Ram 


2,99 


16K x I Dynamic Ram 


5.00 


32K Eprom 


39.95 



Microprocessor 
PIA 

CRT Control ler 

ACIA 

SSDA 

Microprocessor 

Microprocessor 

Microprocessor 

Microprocessor 

PI0 

SI0/0 

S10/I 

8 Bit input/output part 

Communication Interface 

UART 

Four Bit Microprocessor 

PSAT 

DMA Control ler 

64 x 4 FIFO 
Clock wi th alarm 

8 Bit Microcomputer with 
programmable/ erasable EPROM 
6 Bit D/A 



CRYSTAL FILTERS 
TYCO 001-19880 Same as 2 1 9^F 
10,7 MHz narrow band 
3 dB bandwidth 15 KHz min. 
20 dB bandwidth 60 KHz min. 
40 dB bandwidth 150 KHz min. 
Ultimate 50 dB insertion loss 
Ripple 1 dB max- Ct. CM-/-5 pf 
»-99 e*ch 



dB max. 
3 600 Ohms 



HRFkSk, same as MRF*+58 12.5 VDC , 3-30 MHz 

30 Watts output, 12 dB gain $17.95 each 



9.99 
6.99 

25.00 

4.99 
5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

JO. 99 
8.99 
9.99 

22.50 

22.50 

3.99 
6.99 

6.99 

4.99 

5.99 

8.99 
3.00 

5.99 
60.00 

60.00 
3.25 
9.99 

9-95 



MRF472 

12.5 VDC, 27 MHz 

4 Watts output, 10 dB gain 

$1 .69 each 

CARBIDE CIRCUIT BOARD DRILL BITS 
for PCB Boards 

5 mix for $5.00 



MURATA CERAMIC FILTERS 
SFD i+55D 455 KHz 

SFB 1+5 5D 455 KHz 

CFM 455E 455 KHz 

SFE 10.7 MA 10.7 MHz 



$2.00 
t.60 

5-50 

2.99 



ATLAS CRYSTAL FILTERS FOR ATLAS 

HAM GEAR 
5.52 - 2.7/8 
5.595 - 2.7/8/U 

- 2.7/8 

- .500/VCW 

- 2.7 USB 

- 2.7/8/L 

- 2.7 LSB 
USB/CW 



5.645 
5.595 
5.595 
5.595 

5.595 

9.0 - 



YOUR CHOICE 
$12.99 each 



J310 N-CHANNEL J-FET 450 MHz 
Good for VHF/UHF Amplifier, 
Oscillator and Mixers 3 /J 1.00 

AMPHEN0L COAX RELAY 

26 VDC Coil SPDT #3&0-1l892-13 

100 Watts Good up to 18 GHz 

$19.99 each 



7&MG5 Same as 78O5 but only i Amp (® 
5 VOC 49c each or 10/$ 3^00 



NEW TRANSFORMERS 



F-18X 

F-46X 

F-4IX 

P-B380 

P-8604 

P-8I3O 

K-32B 

E3Q554 



6.3 VCT <a 6 Amps 
24 V O 1 Amp 
25.2 VCT @ 2 Amps 
10 VCT @ 3 Amps 
20 VCT & 1 Amp 
12,6 VCT @> 2 Amps 
28 VCT @ 100 HA 
Dual 17V @ )Amp ea 



$6,99 ea. 
5-99 ea. 
6.99 ea. 
7.99 ea* 
4.99 ea. 
4.99 ea. 
4.99 ea. 
6,99 ea 



EIMAC FINGER STOCK #Y-302 

36 in. long x | in. $4.99 each 



NO ORDERS UNDER $10 



132 73 Magazine * February, 1981 




2822 North 32nd Street. #1 • Phoenix, Arizona 85008 • Phone 602-956-9423 



MRF203 


$P.0.R. 


HRF216 


19.^7 


MRF221 


8.73 


MRF226 


10.20 


MRF227 


2.13 


MRF238 


10.00 


MRF2**0 


1^,62 


MRF245 


28.87 


MRF2**7 


28.87 


MRF262 


6.25 


MRF314 


12.20 


MRFii06 


11.33 


MRFU12 


20.65 


MRF*f2l 


27.^+5 


HPFkZ2A 


38.25 


HRF'+22 


38.25 


HKFhlB 


38.25 


MRFi+28A 


38.25 


HRFi+26 


8.37 


HRF1+26A 


8.87 


MRFM*9 


10.61 


MRFM+9A 


10.61 


MRF^SO 


11.00 


MRF^+SOA 


* f f 


MRF452 


15.00 


MRF*+53 


13.72 


MRF*M 


21.83 


MRFitS^ 


21.83 


HKFkSS 


14.08 


MRF^55A 


14.08 


MRF*f72 


2.50 


MRF474 


3.00 


MRFl*75 


2.90 


MRF476 


2.25 


MRF**77 


10.00 


MRFJ+85 


3.00 


MRFU92 


20.40 


HRF502 


.93 


MRF6C+ 


2.00 


MRF629 


3.00 


MRF648 


26.87 


MRF901 


3.99 


MRF902 


9.41 


MRF90i* 


3.00 


MRF9H 


4.29 


MRF5176 


11.73 


HRF8004 


1.39 


BFR90 


1.00 


BFR91 


1.25 


BFR96 


1.50 



BFW92A 


$ 1.00 


BFW92 


.79 


MMCM913 


14.30 


MMCM2222 


15.65 


HKCM2369 


15.00 


MMCM2484 


15.25 


MMCM3960A 


24.30 


MWA 1 1 


6.92 


MWA 1 20 


7.38 


MWA 130 


8.08 


MWA210 


7.4b 


MWA220 


8.08 


MWA230 


8.62 


MWA310 


8.03 


MWA 3 20 


8.62 


MWA330 


9.23 


TUBES 




6ko6 


$ 5.00 


6LQ6/6JE6 


6.00 


6MJ6/6L0_6/6JE6C 


6.00 


6LF6/6MH6 


5.00 


12BY7A 


4.00 


2E26 


4.69 


4x 1 50A 


29.99 


4CX250B 


45.00 


4CX250R 


69.00 


4CX300A 


109.99 


4CX350A/8321 


100.00 


4CX350F/J/8904 


1 00 . 00 


4CX1500B/8660 


300.00 


81 1A 


20.00 


6360 


4.69 


6939 


7.99 


6146 


5.00 


6I46A 


5.69 


6 1 46B /8298 


7.95 


6146W 


12.00 


6550A 


8.00 


8908 


9.00 


8950 


9.00 


4-400A 


71.00 


4-400C 


80 . 00 


572B/T160L 


44.00 


7289 


9-95 


3-1000Z 


229.00 


3-5002 


129-99 



TO-3 TRANSISTOR SOCKETS 
Phenol ic type 6/$l ,00 



UHF/VHF RF POWER TRANSISTORS 

CD2867/2N6i*39 

60 Watts output 

Reg. Price 5^5 -77 

SALE PRICE $13.95 

1900 MHz to 2500 MHz DOWNCONVERTERS 
Intended for amateur radio use 
Tunable from channel 2 thru 6 
3^ dB gain 2.5 ~ 3 dB noise 
Warranty for 6 months 
Model HMR II with dish antenna 
Complete Receiver and Power Supply 
$225*00 (does not include coax) 
k foot YagI antenna only 

§39,99 

Downconverter Kit - PCB 

$69.95 

Power Supply Kit * Box, 

$^9*99 

Downconverter assembled 

$79-99 

Power Supply assembled 

$59.99 

Complete Kit with Yagi antenna 
$ IO9.99 

REPLACEMENT PARTS 
MRF90I $ 3.99 

MBDJ0I 1,29 

,001 Chip Caps I .00 
Power supply PCB 4.99 
Downconverter PCB _ _l_9*_9ft _ 

Bogner down converter, industrial version. 1 
year guarantee $225.00 



and parts 
PCB and parts 



36 PIN MOTOROLA BUS EDGE CONNECTORS 
Gold plated contacts 
Dual ^3/86 pin ,156 spacing 
Sold er tail for PCB $3.00 each 

CONTINUOUS TONE BUZZERS 

12 VDC $2.00 each 

110 VAC MUFFIN FANS 

New $11.95 Used $5.95 



PL-259 TERMINATION 
$1.50 each 



52 Ohm 5 Watts 



NO ORDERS UNDER $10 



** Header Service— see page 146 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 133 




2822 North 32nd Street, #1 • Phoenix, Arizona 85008 • Phone 602-956-9423 " 64 



2N2857JAN 


$ 2.50 


2N2949 


3.60 


2N29<*7 


15.00 


2M2950 


U.60 


2N3375 


8.00 


2N3553 


1.57 


2N3818 


5.00 


2N3866 


1.00 


2N3866JAN 


2.50 


2N3866JANTX 


U.00 


2N3925 


10.00 


2N3948 


2.00 


2H3950 


25.00 


2N3959 


3-00 


2N3960JANTX 


10.00 


2N4072 


1.60 


2H¥f27 


1.10 


2N4429 


7.00 


2NU877 


1.00 


2Ni*959 


2.00 


2M^976 


15.00 


2H5070 


8.00 


2N5071 


15.00 


2N5108 


4.00 


2N5109 


1.50 


2N5179 


1.00 


2N5583 


4.00 


2N5589 


6.00 


2N5590 


8.00 


2N5591 


11.00 


2N5635 


5.44 


2N5636 


11.60 


2N5637 


20.00 


2N5&»1 


5.00 


2N5643 


14.00 


2N56i+5 


10.00 


2N5842 


8.00 


2N58't9 


20.00 


2N59^2 


40.00 


2N59 I *6 


14.00 


2N5862 


50.00 


2N6080 


7.00 


2N6081 


10.00 


2N6082 


11.00 


2N6083 


13-00 


2N6084 


14.00 


2N6095 


11.00 


2N6096 


20.00 



2N6097 


$28, 


,00 


2N6166 


38, 


.00 


2N6368 


22, 


.99 


2N6439 


40, 


.00 


A210/MRF517 


2, 


.00 


BLY38 


5, 


.00 


40280/2N4427 


I, 


.10 


40281 /2N 3 920 


7, 


.00 


40282 /2N 3 927 


10 


.48 


NE555V TIMERS 






39( each or 10 


/<?}A 


DO 


NEW DUAL COLON 


LED 




69$ each or 






10/$5.00 







HEP170 1000 PIV 

2.5 Amps 25< each or 

100/$15.00 

HIGH VOLTAGE CAPS 
^20 MFD § 400 VDC OR 
600 MFD <S> 400 VDC 
$6,99 each 

NEW ROTROM BISCUIT FANS 
Modal 8T2AI 115 VAC 
$12,99 each 

TO RIM TA700 FANS NEW 

Model A3 03 40 

230 VAC @ -73 Amps 

Will also work on 115 VAC 

$29-99 each 



DOOR KNOB CAPS 
470 pf @ 15 KV 
Dual 500 pf @ 15 KV 
680 pf & 6 KV 
800 pf <5> 15 KV 
1000 pf @ 20 KV 
2700 Pf @ 40 KV 



NEW & USED BCD SWITCHES 
3 switch with end plates 
New $8,99 
Used $6,95 



ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS 

Check, money order, or credit cards 
welcome, (Mas tercharge and VISA only) 
No personal checks or certified personal 
checks for foreign countrys accepted. 
Money order or cashiers check in U.S. 
funds only* Letters of credit are not 
acceptable* 

Minimum shipping by UPS is $2.35 with 
insurance* Please allow extra shipping 
charges for heavy or long items. 

All parts returned due to customer error 
will be subject to a 15% restock charge. 

If we are out of an item ordered, we 
will try to replace ft with an equal or 
better part unless you specify not to, 
or we will back order the item, or 
refund your money. 

PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT 
NOTICE, Prices superseade all previously 
published* Some items offered are 
limited to small quantities and are 
subject to prior sale. 

We now have a toll free number but 
we ask that it be used for CHARGE ORDERS 
ONLY, if you have any questions please 
use our other number. We are open from 
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Monday thru Saturday, 

Our toll free number for orders only 
is 800-528-3611. 



JUMBO LED's 

Red 8/$ 1.00 
Clear 6/$1.00 
Yellow 6/$ 1,00 
Green 6/$l .00 
Amber 6/S1 .00 



MEDIUM LED's 



Red 

Green 



6/$l,00 
6/$l,00 



NEW G.E. OPTO COUPLERS 4N26 
69c each or 1Q/$5»0Q 

MICRO-MINI WATCH CRYSTALS 
32.768 Hz $3.00 each 

NEW 2 inch ROUND SPEAKERS 
100 Ohm coi 1 99 ^ each 

PLASTIC TO-3 SOCKETS V$1,00 



$3. 


.99 


each 


5. 


.99 


each 


3. 


.99 


each 


3. 


.99 


each 


5. 


.00 


each 


5. 


■99 


each 



NO ORDERS UNDER $10 



134 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



INTRODUCING SONY'S NEW DIGITAL 
/-^ DIRECT ACCESS RECEIVER! 



95 p |us 

$5,00 
shipping 




Revolutionary 
Direct Access Digital 
Shortwave Scanner 

• Continuous Scanning of LW, MW, SW, & FM Bands 

• Instant Fingertip Tuning— -No More Knobs* 

• 6 Memories for Any Mode (AM,SSB!CW, & FM) 

• Dual PLL Frequency Synthesized— No Drift! 



A WHOLE NEW BREED OF RADIO IS HERE NOW! No other 
short wave receiver combines so many advanced features for 
both operating convenience and high performance as does the 
new Sony ICF2Q01 Once you have operated this exciting new 
radio, you'll be spoiled forever! Direct access tuning eliminates 
conventional toning knobs and dials wilh a convenient digital 
keyboard and Liquid Crystal Display {LCD) for accurate frequen- 
cy readout to within 1 KHz. Instant fingertip tuning, up to 8 
memory presets, and continuous scanning features make the 
ICF-2001 the ultimate In convenience. 

Compare the following features against any receiver currently 
available and you will have to agree that the Sony ICF 2001 is the 
best value in shortwave receivers today? 

DUAL PLL SYNTHESIZER CIRCUITRY covers entire 150 KHz to 
29.999 MHz band. PLL, circuit has 100 KHz slep white PLL 2 
handles 1 KHz step, both of which are controlled by separate 
quartz crystal oscillators for precise, no-drift tuning DUAL CON 
VERSION SUPERHETERODYNE circuitry assures superior AM 
reception and high image refection characteristics The 10.7 MHz 
IF of the FM band is utilized as the 2nd IF of the AM band. A new 
type of crystal fitter made especially for this purpose realizes 
clearer reception than commonly used ceramic fillers. ALL FET 
FRONT END for high sensitivity and interference rejection. Inter- 
modulation, cross modulation, and spurious interference are ef- 
fectively rejected. FET RF AMP contributes to superior image re- 
lection, high sensitivity, and good signal to noise ratio Both 
strong and weak stations are received wilh minimal distortion. 



® © 



A Enter Button 
8 Signal Strength 
Indicator 

C Liquid Crystal Display 
Memory Preset Buttons 
E Antenna Adjustment 
Dial 



F SSB/CW Compensator 

G Execute Bar 

H Manual Tuning Buttons 

I Scan Button 

J High/Low Limit Buttons 



EXTENDED SPECTRUM CONTINUOUS TUNING 



AM 



M ^ 150 to 29 '"9 KHz 3¥1 

isa E22 Wf J£H £Ad *jA ttt XXX 



T^*r 




FM 
76 to 108^ 

MHz ^\ 



OPERATIONAL FEATURES 
INSTANT FINGERTIP TUNING with the calculator-type key board 
enables the operator to have instant access to any frequency In 
the LW, MW, SW t and FM bands. And the LCD digital frequency 
display confirms the exact, drift-free signal being received, 
AUTOMATIC SCANNING of the above bands. Continuous 
scanning of any desired portion of the band is achieved by 
setting the "L^ " and "Lj 11 keys to define the range to be scanned. 
The scanner can stop automatically on strong signals, or it can 
be done manually, MANUAL SEARCH is similar to the manual 
scan mode and is useful for quick signal searching. The ,+ UP" 
and "DOWN" keys let the tuner search for you. The "FAST'* key 
increases the search rate for faster signal detection. MEMORY 
PRESETS. Six memory keys hold desired stations tor instant 
one-key tuning in any mode {AM, SSB/CW. and FM), and also, the 
"Lf ++ and "Lg" keys can give you two more memory slots when 
not used for scanning. OTHER FEATURES: Local . normal, OX 
sensitivity selector for AM; SSB/CW compensator; 90 min, steep 
timer AM Ant. Adjust, 



SPECIFICATIONS 
CIRCUIT SYSTEM: Fm Superheterodyne; AM Dual conversion 
superheterodyne. SIGNAL CIRCUITRY: 4 IC's, 11 FET's, 23 
Transistors, 16 Diodes. AUXILIARY CIRCUITRY: 5 ICs h 1 LSI, 5 
LED's. 25 Transistors, 9 Diodes FREQUENCY RANGE: FM 
76-108 MHz; AM 150-29.999 KHz. INTERMEDIATE FREQUENCY: 
FM 10.7 MHz.; AM 1st 66.35 MHz., 2nd 10.7 MHz. ANTENNAS: FM 
telescopic, ext. am terminal; AM telescopic, built-in ferrite bar, 
ext. ant. terminal POWER: 4,5 VDCM20 VAC DIMENSIONS: 12V« 
fW) X 2V+ (HJ X 6^ (D). WEIGHT: 3 lb 15 oz. (1.B kg) 




p" Reader Service — seepage J 46 



73 Magazine ■ February, 1981 135 





P.O. Box 401244-E Garland, TX. 75040 (214)278-3553 



The Greatest Breakthrough 
In Electronic Music Ever! 



Super Music 
Maker 

REVISION 2 

$Z4.95 

(Basic Kit) 
Doss not mcJtrcfe speaker 
switches or Z?m ROM 



Doorbells 




I 
i 



Muuc Boies 
Store D<*play* 



Now you can play tiund reds of songs using the Bu net Super 
Music Maker. The unit features a single factory 
programmed microprocessor IC that comes wilh 20 pre- 
programmed short tunes. By adding the additional PROMS 
(2708'sJ the system Can be expanded to pEay up to 1000 
notes per FROM. Just think a compact electronic 

instrument that wilt play dozens, hundreds or even 
thousands Of selections of music The kit comes with all 
electronic component! (less the PROM), and a drilled, 
plated ami screened PC Board which measures 4*' x 4 
The 7 watt amplifier section is on the same PC board and 
drives an 8 ohm speaker (not included ) r from a whisper to 
ear splitting volume Since the unit works on 12 VDC or 12 
VAC*, vehicle or portable operation is possible What do 
you get for $24.95? Everything but a speaker, transformer, 
case, switches, and PROM. Additional 2708 albums 
containing popular tunes are available for (15.00 each or 
you can program your own PROMS using information 
provided with the kit instructions Lists of available PROM 
albums are available on request {Note Untt plays 
electronic music one note at a time, it i$ not possible to piay 
chords or a melody with harmony simultaneously, / 

* Envelope control gives decay to notes. 

* "Next tune" feature allows sequential playing of al I songs 

* On board inverter allows single voltage (+12} operation 

OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES 

DIP Switches One 8 po$. One 5 pos 2.00 Set 

(Can be directly soldered to PC Bd to access tunes) 

Rotary Switches Two 5 position 2.00/Set 

(For remote wiling to PC Bd, to access tunes) 

Attractive Black Plastic Case 6. 50 

Wallplug Transformer 3.00 

(For operation on 117VAC house voltage) 



Super Value Power Transformer 

Weil made, open frame tr anslorrner *»ih mounting ears Build a 
»5 and fc12 supply with inexpensive parts Free schematics of 
several design*. Primary 1 17VAC. SEC #1 15 VAC A SEC 

#2 15 VAC @ 5A SEC *3 BVAC @ ? 5A J2 95 

OftOsTft: BET-QQQ5 



t 

t 



7 Watt Audio Amp Kit $5.95 

SMALL SINGLE, HYBRID IC AND COMPONENTS FIT ON A 
2" x y PC BOARD (INCLUDED! RUNS OH 12 VDC GREAT 
FOR AN V PROJECT THAT NEEDS AN INEXPENSIVE AMP 
LESS THAN 3% THD @ S WATTS COMPATIBLE WITH 5E- 
01 SOUND KPT 



O vervoltage Protection Kit $6-95 

Protect your expensive equipmeni from Dvervollage 
conditions Every compuler should have onel Works with any 
(used DC power source from 10 to 20 volts up to 25 amps. 



AY3-8910 PROGRAMMABLE SOUND GENERATOR 

The AY3-S91Q Ik a 40 ptn LSI chip wilt* three oscillators ,, Ihree 
amplitude controls, programmable ItQiSB generate*, th 
mtxers. an envetope generator, and tnree D/A conveners thai 
are controlled by B BIT WORDS No external pots or cap* 
required This Chip nooked to an fl tut microprocessor chip or 
Buss (BOfiti, Z8Q< 6800 etc J can be software controlled to 
produce almost any sound It will play three note chords, make 
bangs, whistles, sirens, gunshots, explosions, bleats, whines. 
or grunts In addition, it has provisions to control its own 
memory chips With two 10 ports The chip requires >5V £a> 
75ma and a standard TTL clock escalator A truly incredible 
circuit 

I2.85w/Basic Spec Sheet (4 pages) 
60 page manual with S-iQO interface instructions and 
several programming examples. S3 00 extra 



ZULU II CLOCK KIT 
X-RATED! 



WITH CALENDAR 

and host circuit 



X-TflA VALUE- All the carnponfrnts and rtiflh quntity pi W PC Bq.< 

ttt& pftivJd&d 
K-TRA CAFlE IN DESIGN fcasy Assemtilyl Large open t«yi igl 
X-CELLENCE IN IDEAS B years of etes I ginttf products lor th* amateur nnim 

mark*?! 
X-CELLENCE IN INSTRUCTIONS: Q\s*t Vep-by-gtttp >nalruchom wftfe 

qu*'.\*>, illustrations ami icrwnatic 
X-TI^FEATURESiTnereiMSflewef bEtnaciu^khtiwTrisornartv^aJtin?^ - ai 

an. 

• Unit operates c 12 VAC : 12 VDC 

• On board OUARTZ XTAL T1MEBAS6 o* GOMZ AC Una fraq can be \a*H 
■ Automat > flATTERY BACKUP 1 

• ReaC M HOUR TIME and 31 DAY CALENDAR. 

• Unique NOX p CIRCUIT activates readout* wiih a handclap followed fty Ihe 
dale lor * second*. Or thi»y can be turned on constantly 

» When utioeJ mobile readout! rjf-znk who ignition is off 

• Spec i pt i NOISE suppression and bsllsry revefsai elrpulifl 

• Brigftl I -2" LED '5 sb6w hours, minuipun-; "is 



19.95 

LESS CASE 

ACCESSORIES 

Cuitom High Impact 
Molded Caw with Ruby 
Lens, Available in B kit or 

Tb. 

S6-50 

t17 VAC to 12 VAC 
Tranilormer. 

S1.35 
■9V Bnliory Not Indudnd 




Sound Effects Kit 18.50 



The SE-fll Sound E fleets K i r n a corn piete kit. all you need lo t>u if d 
a programmable sound effects machine encepi a battery and 
speaker Our tat ts designed to really ring out the Tl 76477 Sound 
Chip, Only the SE*0l provides you with addileonal circuitry that 
includes a PULSE GENERATOR MUK OSCILLATOR and 
COMPARITOR [rj make more complex sounds a snap Wo help 
you in building rhe kit with a clear, oasy-to-taliow construction 
rnanui.il and we show you how to easily program the unu Other 
dealers wi II sell you the chip or of parts hut you are on your 

own to do tlvemost difficult part mafceneal sounds! Wjrhin a short 
lime after you build the SE-Ot you can easily create Gunihoti. 
Explosions, Space Sounds. Steam Train* and much more 
mmk the Bullet SE-Ot is the best dear on the market but dont asfc 
us, - ask Ihp 15, DOC happy SE-ul owners' 

Complete Kii W^tn Quality Plated PC Board S1S50 

{Less battL-ry & speaker t 



AUTO/VAN CLOCK KIT 

16.95 

* 12 Hr Format 

- 6 Digit W LED Readouts 

* Quart? XTAL Tim«*base 

* Alarm & Snooze Options 

* Noise Filtering 

■ Easy Assembly # 12 VDC 

■ 4 5/6" x 3" x 1 1/2" 

* All Parts. 1 



PARTS 



LW304t 


(CA3046J K^lot Array 


,75 


RCA 40*30 


403V 6A TUlAC TO-ffi 


.75 


LM56? 


Tome Oecpder 


.99 


CD4046 


PLL CMOS . . 


.99 


LM3302 


Quad CompaTPtor — 


.65 


2SC 1849 


HiflhFreq, NPN 10-92 


6/1 .00 


WPS A 20 


NPM General Purpose 


a/1,00 


TL49Q 


Bar/Graph Dnygrw/ specs . 


2.50 


TB12 


12V 1 A Regulator ,.-. 


.90 


7005 


SV i A Regutaior 


99 


T8M05 


5V ^A R*0 TO-5 <MSC *J . 


60 


LM39^1 


Temp. Transducer w.' spec 5 


1 to 


S^5 


Twrnef ic 


.4! 


MMBH 


PUT w/sptd - 


sa 


IL^1 


Opic isolator w/specs 


so 


LM377 


Dual 1.U380 w- »pecs 


1.09 


TIP-30 


f J NP PowfT TO-220 .... 


3/1.00 


SCR 


Sflnsitivs Gate20uV4A 


//1.0Q 


SCR 


Sensitive G«te fiOOV 






* A RCA 


3/1,00 


GE ST-2 


390 tf*00e tor tracs in 




DIAC 


AC phase control 
operation 


M 



ULTRASONIC RELAY KIT 

Invisible Beam Works Like A Photo 
Electric Eye COMPLETE KIT AilParts* 
PC Board Use Up To 25 ft Apart. 

$21.50 

Optional entry delay and A farm Timeout 
Circuit will source or sink up to 200 MA 
DC 

S3. 95 



TG-3 PX- BOARD HEATSINK 

Perfect for power transistors, or 309 
and 340K series voltage regulators. 

3/1-10 

Th*rmol4y H601* 
Stack Anodicod 




I 

I 
I 



THE PERFECT TRANSFORMER 
11 7VAC primary 1 2V AC secondary @ 200m a 
Great for all your CMOS, or low power TTL 
projects. PC &gard mount order 

W ea. 3 S2.50 XF*R 03 
Size 1.5 W n 1 25" D k 1 25 1 " H 



115W NPN POWER TRANSISTOR TO-3 
Most popular transistor for power 
supplies audio amps, switching, etc 

Lrmit 20 per customer 50C Each 



CALL OR WRITE TODAY FOR FREE CATALOG 



* 



NO CO D 

SEND CHECK, M.O . OR 

CREDIT CARD n 

PHONE ORDERS ACCEPTED 

ON VtSA/T^ASTER CHARGE ONLY 

(214) 278-3553 



P 

O 

L 

\ 

C 
I 

E 
S 



* ADO 5% FOR SHIPPING 

* ORDERS UNDER S10 ADD 

75 HANDLING 

* TEX RES ADD 5% TAX 

* FOREIGN ORDERS (EXCEPT 
CANADA) ADO 10% {20% FOR 
AIRMAIL) 



1 

♦ 
t 

t 
t 

t 
t 
I 



^12 



136 73 Magazine ■ February, 1981 



lamsa^j the first name in Counters ! 



9 DIGITS 600 MHz $129 




SPECIFICATIONS: 



WIRED 



ami 

cr w a a *o at? ***« - « 

AC I AC fclspwi 
flp t Nfetd pkI *-A( 

OV I. Mii'h>Jnj*ti 0*** 

Urar tiiH 

ElHmul IHM tikM ircpMi 



The CT-90 is the most versatile, feature packed cannier available for lew 
than $300.00* Advanced design feature* include three selectable gale times, 
trme digits gate indicator and a unique display hold function winch holds the 
displayed count after the input signal is removed? Also, a I OmHz TCXO time 
base is used which enables easy zero beat calibration checks against WWV 
Optionally, in internal nk ad battery pack, external Lime base input and Micro 
power high stability crystal oven time bane are available The CT-90, 
performance you can count on 1 



Range 
Sensitivity: 

Resolution: 



Display; 
Time base 

Power 



WIRED 



SPFCIFH ATIONS: 



Range: 
Sensitivity 

Resolution 



Display 
Tune base 
Power 



20 Hz to 525 MHz 

Less than 50 MV to 150 MHz 

Less than j 50 MV to 500 MHz 

IjQ Hz (5 MHz rangcj 

100 Hi (50 MHi rangcj 

100.0 Hz [500 MHz range) 

7 digits 4" LED 

1.0 ppm TCXO 20-40 C 

\2 VAC « :50 ma 



The CT 70 breaks the pace barrier on lab quality frequency counters. 
Deluxe lea lures such bsl three Frequency ranges - each with pre- amplification, 
dual selectable gate limes, and gate activity indication make measurements a 
snap. The wide frequency range enables you lo. accurately measure signals 

thro «»d» thru UHF with 1 ,0 ppm accuracy - tba4's ,0001%! The CT-70 is 
the answer to all your measurement needs, in the field lab or bam shack. 



2Q Hz to 600 MHz 

Less than 10 MV to 1 50 MHt 

Less than 50 MV to 500 MHz 

1 Hz (10 MHz range) 

L0 Hz (60 MHz range! 

10.0 Hz (600 MHz range) 

9 digits 1X4" LED 

Standard- 10.000 mHz, L0 ppm 20»40*C. 

Optional Micro- power oveftO.l ppm 20-40' C 

fct|5 VAC <» 250 ma 



7 DIGITS 525 MHz $99 




FK1CE& 

CT-70 wired J year warranty 

CT-70 Kit. 9Q day parts war 

ranty 

AC I AC adapter 

BP-1 Njcad pact + AC 

adapter charger 



$99,95 




7 DIGITS 500 MHz $79 & 



PRICES: 

MINU00 wired. I year 

warranty $79-95 

MINI- 100 Kf$ 90 day part 

warranty 59 95 

AC-Z Ac adapter for MINI 

100 1.95 

BP-Z Nicad pack and AC 

adapter -iinr^er 12.95 



Here's ■ handy T general purpose counter that provide* most counter 
functions at an unbelievable price The MINI- 100 doesn't hare the full 
frequency range or input impedance qualities found in higher price units, but 
for basic RF signal measurements, if can't be bead Accurate measurements 
can be made from I MHz all the way up to 5 00 MHt with excellent sensitivity 
throughout the range, and the two gate times let you select the resolution 
desired. Add the nicad pack option and the MINI- 1 00 makes an ideal addition 
to your tool boa for "in- the- field frequency checks and repairs. 



WIRED 



SPECIFICATIONS: 



Range 

Sensitivity: 

Resolution: 

Display: 
Time base: 
Power; 



I MHz to 500 MHz 
Less than 25 MV 
LOO Hz (slow gate) 
1.0 KHz (fast gate} 
7 digit*, 0.4" LED 
2.0 ppm 20-40 C 
5 VDC <* 200 ma 



8 DIGITS 600 MHz $159 






#.* 



tr 



WIRED 



SPECIFICATIONS: 



Range: 
Sensitivity: 

Resolution: 

Tune base: 
Power 



20 Hz to 600 MHz The CT-50 is a versatile lab bench counter that will measure up to 6 00 MHz 

Less than 25tfivtn|50MHz ^rjj g digit precision- And, one of its best features is the Receive Frequency 
Less than I 50 mv to 600 MHz AdMpfcr whkh ^^ ^ rT50 mm m ^giial twJduI fa My receiver The 

1.0 Hz (60 MHz range > _. 

Ifti i TT .^ . „_ adapter is easily programmed lor any receiver add a simple connection to the 

tO.O Hz (600 MHz range* r * r " J 

8 diBJts 4" LED receiver's VFO is all that n required for use Adding the receiver adapter in no 

2.0 ppm 20-40 C *■¥ limits the operation of the CT-50. the adapter can be conveniently 

1 10 VAC or 1 2 VDC twitched on or off The CT-50. a counter that can work double-duty! 




PRKT-.S: 

CT-50 wired, 1 year warranty 

CT-50 Kit 90 day parts 

warranty 

RA- J . receiver adapter kit 

RA- 1 ■rired and pre- uf ogj an> 

roed ( send copy of i teener 

Schematic) 



SI 59.95 

119.95 
14 95 




DIGITAL MULTIMETER $99 



WIRED 



PRIC^ 




DM-700 wired 1 year warranty 


599,95 


DM-700 Kit. 90 day parts 




warranty 


79,95 


ACL AC adaptor 


3,95 


BP-3, Nicad pack +AC 




adapter/ charger 


1995 


MF-L Probe kiL 


295 



"The DM-700 orders profesH*nal qualrtv performance at * hafcb<ire#r pntr 
Fniurei include; 26 different rangn ami 5 functions, all Arranged in a 
conveniens eaav to use format Measure mm ci are displayed un a large J - 
dipt, Ifli inch LED readout with automatic decimal placement, automan. 
polarity, overran gr indication a nd overload protection up to 1 250 vol Hon ail 
ranges, making it virtually goof- proof! The DM-700 looks great, * handsome, 
jet Hai_k. rugged ABS case with convenient retraitable rilt hul makes u an 
ideal addition to any shop. 



SPECIFICATIONS 


DC AC volts: 


JOOuV to 1 KV. 5 ranges 


DC/ AC 




Current 


0- 1 uA to 2.0 Amps, 5 ranges 


Resistance: 


0.1 ohms to 20 Megohms. 6 ranges 


Input 




impedance 


10 Megohms, DC/ AC volts 


Accuracy: 


10 1% basic DC volts 


Power 


4 "C cells 



AUDIO SCALER 



For high resolution audio measurements, multiplies 
UP in frequency, 

• Great for PL tones 

• Multiplies by 10 or 100 

• 0.01 Hz resolution! 

529,95 Kn 139,95 Wired 



ACCESSORIES 

Telescopic whip antenna - BNC plug. . 5 7.95 

High impedance probe, light loading 1 5.95 

Low pass probe; for audio measurements ...... 15 ,9i 

Direct probe, general purpose usage .■...,+ 1 2.95 

Tilt bail, forCT70, 90. M1NM00 ,, 3.95 

Color burst calibration unit calibrates counter 

against cokw TV signal, 14,95 



COUNTER PREAMP 

For measuring extremely weak signal* from 10 to 1,000 

MH: Smalt sue, powered by pJtiK transform cr-inc I uded- 

• Flat 25 db gain 

• BNC Connectors 

• Great for sniffing RF with pick-up loop 

534 95 Kit 544.95 Wired 



remsey electronic's, inc. 

2575 Baird Rd. Penfield. NY 14526 




'62 



PHONE ORDERS 
CALL 716-586-3950 



I HMV iot: i^a* i-'O" g*i *» oTrf m+d *BOfn*A* fa* ID da*i -I ^e* pltmfd 

mu'anif **o mo»iHiM«** of S s Ov*«itm 01M ' i • COD add 
17 0'(tt'M^<H(3 >iddl" SO *J» ^+f.<(*F*tv add > Igi 



** Reader Service— see page 146 



73 Magazine • February, 1981 137 




on 

Scanners! 

NEW Product! 

Communications Electronics? the 
world's largest distributor of radio scan- 
ners, welcomes the addition of the Fanon 
SCMA*6 accessory to our product line. 
This useful accessory mounts in your car 
and makes your Fanon Slimline scanner 
work like a high priced mobile receiver. 

A new product made by Electra, the 
Freedom Phone' 1 is now available from CE. 
This is the ultimate cordless extention 
phone that can make and take your calls. 

We g ive you excellent service because CE 
distributes more scanners worldwide than 
anyone else. Our warehouse facilities are 
equipped to process thousands of scanner 
orders every week. We also export scanners 
to over 300 countries and military instal- 
lations. Most items are in stock for quick 
shipment, so order today from CE! 

Bearcat?300 

The Ultimate Synthesized Scanner I 

List price $519 95 CE price S329.O0 
4~Bandi SO Channel • Service Search • No- 
cry s fa/ scanner * AM Aircraft and Public 
Service bands. • Priority Channel • AC/DC 

Bands 32-50. 11 8- 136 AM, 144-174, 421*512 MHz 
The new Bearcat 300 is tne most advanced auto* 
matic scanning radio mat has ever been offered to 
the public. The Bearcat 300 uses a bright careen 
fluorescent digital display, so it's ideal for mobile 
applications. The B&arcat 300 now has Ihese 
added features; Service Search, DispJay Intensity 
Control, Hold Search and Resume Search keys, 
Separate Band keys to permit took- in/ lock-out of 
any band (or more efficient service search. 

Bearcat® 250 

Ust price S419.95/CE price S269.O0 

SO Channels • Crystatless • Searches 

Stores ■ Recalls • Digital clock • AC/ DC 
Priority Channel • J- Band • Count Feature. 

Frequency range 32-50, 146-174, 420-512 MHz 
The Bearcat 250 performs any scanning function yog 
could possibly want. With push button ease you can 
program up to 50 channels for automatic monitoring. 
Overseas customers should order the Bearcat 250FB 
at S 34 9.00 each. This model is like a Bearcat 250, but 
designed for international operation with 220 VAC/ 1 2 V 
DC power supply and 66-88 MHz tow band coverage 
instead of 32-50 MHz 

Bearcat® 220 

List price $419 95/CE price $269,00 
Aircraft and public tmrvice monitor. Frequency 
range 32-50, US-136AM, 144-174, 420*512 MHz. 
The Bearcat 220 is one scanner which can monitor all 
public service bands plus Ihe exciting AM aircraft band 
channels. Up to twenty frequencies may be scanned at 
the same lime Overseas customers should order the 
Bearcat 220 FB at $349 00 each. This model is like a 
Bearcat 220, but designed tor international operation 
with 220 V AC/ 12 V DC power supply and 6G-88 MHz 
low band coverage instead of 32 50 MHz, 

NEW! Bearcat® 21 OXL 

List price S319.95/CE price 5209.00 
fS Channels • 3 Bands • Crystal toss * AC/ DC 
Frequency range: 32-50. 144-174, 421-512 MHz. 
The Bearcat r 2 1 OX L scan ni ng ra d io is \ h e second g ener- 
ation scanner that replaces the popular Bearcat 210 
and 21 1. It has almost twice the scanning capacity ol 
the Bearcat 210 with 13 channels pJus dual scanning 
speeds and a bright green fluorescent display. Auto- 
matic search finds new frequencies Features scan 
delay, single antenna, patented track tuning and more? 



NEW! 

Bearcat 
160 




Regency 1 ! M400 




NEW! 50-Channel Bearcat 300 



NEW! Bearcat 2 160 

List price S279.95 CE price S1 89.00 

16 Channels • 3 Bands • AC only a Priority 

Dual Scan Speeds a Direct Channel Access 

Frequency range: 32-50, 144-174, 440-512 MHz. 
Would you believe... the Bearcat 160 is the least 
expensive Bearcat crystalless scanner. 

This scanner presents a new dimension in 
scanning form and function. Look at the smooth 
keyboard. No buttons to punch. No knobs to turn. 
Instead, finger-lip pads provide control of ail 
scanning operations, including On Off, Volume 
and Squelch. The Bearcat 160 features 1 6-channel 
monitoring of trie most popular public service 
bands. And to locate more of what you're listening 
for; Electra introduces another operating conven- 
ience: Manual Search. Used with Automatic Search 
it simplifies seeking and finding unknown but active 
frequencies Of course the Bearcat 160 incorpo- 
rates other advanced Bearcat features such as 
Priority, Direct Channel Access, Dual Scan Speeds, 
Automatic Channel Lockout, Scan Delay and 
Auxiliary, AM this performance In sleek, contempo- 
rary styling. And at a price so low, it astounds even us 1 

Bearcat* 5 

List price $129.95 CE price $94. OO 

9 Crystal Channels 9 3 Bands * AC only 

Frequency range 35-50. 14&174. 450-508 Mhj: 

The Bearcat 5 is a value-packed crystal scanner built lor 

the scanning professional — at a price the lirsHime 

buyer can allord. individual lockout swiiches. 

Bearcat" Four-Six ThinSearT 

List price $179, 95/CE price $114.00 
Frequency range: 33-47, 152164, 450-503 MHz. 
The incredible, new Bearcat Four-Six Thin Scan* is like 
having an information center in your pocket This three 
band. 6 channel crystal controlled scanner has patented 
Track Tuning on UHF. Scan Delay and Chan net Lockout 
Measures 2 1 * * 6 1 '* x 1 ; Includes rubber ducky antenna. 
Order crystals tor each channel Made m Japan. 

NEW! Fanon Slimline 6-HLU 

List price S 169 95/CE price Si 09,00 
Low cost B'channal, 3- band scanner! 
The new Fanon Slimline 6-hlU gives you six channels 
of crystal controlled excitement Unique Automatic 
Peak Tuning Circuit adjusts the receiver front end for 
maximum sensitivity across the entire UHF band, indi- 
vidual channel lockout switches. Frequency range 30*50. 
146-173 and450-5T2MH*. Size2-*x6'+K 1 Includes 
rubber ducky antenna Order crystal certificates for each 
channel Made in Japan, 

NEW! Fanon Slimline 6-HL 

List price St 49. 95/CE price $99.00 
G-Channet performance at 4*channel cost! 
Frequency range; 30-50, 146' 175 MHz. 
If you don'f need the UHF band, get this model and save 
money. Same high performance and features as the 
model HLU without the UHF band. Order crystal certifi- 
cates for each channel. Made in Japan. 

FANON SCANNER ACCESSORIES 

SCMA 6 Mobile Adapter/Baitery Charger 549.00 

CHB-6 AC Adapter/ Battery Charger S1 5.00 

CAT6 Carrying case tor Fanon w'Belt Clip Si 5. 00 

AUC- 3 Auto lighter adapter/ Bat tery Charger Si 500 

OTHER SCANNER ACCESSORIES 

SPSO AC Adapter $9.00 

SP51 Battery Charger £9 DO 

SPSS Carrying Case for Bearcat 4-6 TtiinScan " S ■ 2 00 
FB-E Frequency Directory for Eastern US A, $ J 2.00 

F Q-W Freq uency D rr e ctory tor Western U . S A . . S 1 2 .00 
FFD Federal Frequency Directory for U.S. A $1 2.00 

B-4 1 .2 V AAA Ni- Cad's tor ThinScan™ and Fanon ... S3 ,00 

A-l 35cc Cryala I certificate $3.00 

Add $300 shipping for ail accessories ordered at the same time, 

INCREASED PERFORMANCE ANTENNAS 

It you want the utmost in performance from your 
scanner, it >s essentia r that you use an extern a i antenna. 
We have six case and mobile antennas specifically 
designed for receiving all bands. Order » A60 15 a 
magnet mount mobile antenna. Order #A61 <s a gutter 
clip mobile antenna. Order #A62 is a Trunk- lip mobile 
antenna. Order # A63 tsaS inch hole mount Order 
# A64 is a ^* inch snap-in mount, and # A70 is an all band 
base station antenna. All antennas are 535,00 and 
$3.00 for UPSshipping in Ihecontinental Uniled States 

TEST ANY SCANNER 

Test any scanner purchased from Communications 
Electronics' lor 31 days before you decide to keep it, ft Tor 
any reason you are not completely satisfied, return it in 
original condition with all parts in 31 days, for a. prompt 
refund (less shipping.-' Handling charges and rebate Credits] 



List price $379 95/CE price $259.00 
30 Channel * Synthesized * Service Search 
Digital clock • Digital timer a Mi OO styling 
Search/ Store * Priority Channel a AC? DC 

Frequency range: 30~50 f 144-174, 440-512 MHz. 
The new Regency M400 is a compact programmable 
FM monitor receiver for use at home or on the road. 

OTHER REGENCY SCANNERS 

NEW! R1O40 SI 69.00 

Toych K10O 5199,00 

Touch Ml 00 S 199-00 

NEW! Telephone Products 

Eiectra's cordless Freedom Phone does everything 
an ordinary phone does and more. Because it is cord less, 
you can taKe it anywhere, inside or outside— on the 
patio, by the pool in the garage, ffl the workshop .even 
next door at ihe neighbor's. 

Model FF-500 has pushbutton dialing. Rechargeable 
ni-cad batteries Included, Battery low light. Secure 
feature. Telescopic antenna. Your cost is $179,00. 
Model FF1 soo has the same features as the FF*500 
but also includes a charger. 'cradle that allows the 
phone's handsel 10 be recharged away from the base 
station. Your cost for this cordless phone is 5 1 99 GO. 
The model FF-3000 has all the standard features 
(except charger/cradle 1 ptus interchangeable telescop- 
ic and rubber ducky antenna. Redtai feature Bell clip. 
Carrying case Greater range, Your cost is S229.00 



m 



World Scanner Association 

The WORLD SCANNER ASS0C1 AT ION is sponsored 
as a public service by Communications Electronics; 
When you |0in, you'll receive a one-year membership 
and our quarterly newsletter with scanner news and 
features. You'll also get a wallet LD. card r an Official 
WSA Membership Certificate, and more. FREE classi- 
fied ads for members so you can contact other scanner 
owners when you want to set I of buy a scanner FREE 
membership m the WSA Buyer's Co-op. Your Co-op 
membership will allow you to get special discounts on 
scanners and scanner related products. Since the WSA 
Buyer's Co-op gives you group purchasing power, you 
can easily pay for your membership dues the first time 
you make a Co-op purchase, To join, send Si 200 
($20.00 outs>de U ISA) for your membership materials. 

BUY WITH CONFIDENCE 

To gat the fastest dat ivory from CW of any sea rimer, send 
or phone your order directly to our Scanner Distribution 
Center ' Be sure to calculate your price using true CE prices 
in 1 his ad. Michigan residents please add 4% sales tax, 
Written purchase orders are accepted from approved gov- 
ernment agencies and most well rated firms at a t0% 
surcharge for net 30 billing All sales are subject Io availa- 
bility Ait sates on accessories are tm*i Prices, terms and 
specifications are subject to change without notice Out of 
stock items wit) be placed on backorder automatically unless 
CE is instructed differently. Most products that we sell have 
a manufacturer's warranty. Free copies of warranties on 
these products are available prior io purchase by wnlmg to 
CE, International orders are invited wilh a $20.00 surcharge 
for special handling In addition to shipping charges, All 
Shipments are FOB. Ann Arbor, Michigan. No COD's 
please Non -certified and foreign checks require five weeks 
ban* clearance 

Mail orders to; Communications Electronics; 
Box 1002, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 U.S.A. Add 
S6,00 per scanner or phone product for LLPS. 
ground snipping, or Si 2.00 lor faster UPS. air 
shipping to some locations, II you have a Master 
Charge or Visa card, you may call anytime and 
place a credit card order. Order toll free m the U.S.A. 
800-521-4414. If you are Ouiside the U.S. or in 
Michigan, dial 313-994-4444. Dealer inquiries 
Invited All order lines al Communications 
Electronics" are staffed 24 hours. 

WSA" Scanner Distribution Center* and CE logos are 

trademarks of Communications Electronics" 

t Bearcat and! Freedom Phone are federally registered 

trademarks of Electra Company, a Division of Masco 

Corporation of Indiana. 

f Regency is a federally reg iste red trademark of Regency 

Electronics Inc. 

Copyright 1991 Communications Electronics" 






TU 



i^377 



COMMUNICATIONS 
ELECTRONICS" 

SS4PtH>Bn<fc Q Sok 1002 ZI Ami Art»* M*cftig*fi 4fil06 U S A 
C»ll TOLL-FREE (»O0jS31 441 4 o* Oultrd* U S 4 j3l 1) 064 4444 

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EPROM Erasing Lamp 




2716, 1702A r 5203Q S204Q, etc. 

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■ Camp lata; Mrrth holding tray for 4 cttfapi. 

UVS-11E $79.50 



Jumbo 6-0igil Clock Kit 





1WU >1*CIK*| 

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85 95 



AC and DC Wall Transformers 




tJm lii au tain tlacht, 

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Output 



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ia&m 



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Ch*^ii*- acAararv |b»# Cattl $ X 

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quad U-UH Mil It 
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JlUC0fcXl.CN l-Blt A.'U C-in«r1li I J I. lid I 
UACMttLXKJt-BlE D/AC«ri¥«rtar lU^h L " 1 



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(V1ii.rui : cmitiO)Hi dil|h(a^Dl>f|l "AM 
mi niratt L.LL* llr^r 
WlMM-acenlrcilItT *|IH«.Di«i1 HAM 
4 DWPBtl U:DDllN «^W p-Ji I hi 



1 " 

a.B 

L 
I1.B 

E.e 



I LH 



AC 250 117V/G0HI 12VAC2SOmA S3 95 

AC 500 117V/60Hi 12 VAC 500mA 54 95 

AC 1000 1t7V/60H* 12 VAC lamp SB 95 

DV9200 117V/60H* 4 VDC 20OrnA S3. ZB 

DC 900 120V/6QH? 9 VDC &OO111A 83,95 



CONNECTORS 

x 




DH36P 

PB2&S 

DB5122G 

ZZf44SE 

LKjSBAJ 

LK.89AJ 

UG175AJ 



PL258 
PL 259 
UG200/U 
UG1094/U 



D ■ Subm i n palura Plug , 
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PC Edna [22/44 Pmt 
BNCPluf ■ • - - - 

B«C Jack 

UMF Adaptor 

LJKF Panai Racp- . . , 

UHF Adapter 

UHF Plug 

BNC Plug ,*»*.,, 
BNC i3ulkht»nd Recp. 



« * 



- - 
» ■ 

- 



, $2,96 
. S3 50 
. 8175 
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SI 79 
. S3 7* 
. 8 .49 
. 8129 
. 81 60 
. 81.60 
. 81,79 
. 81 29 



■tELEPrKPME /KEYBOARD CHIPS 






■bb 




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JPC9IJ 
r.iMLJJWN 
M M I 



CM«Cl 

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K»yHJ*rd Encoait tl» N*yi) 
K«Vtrtitrd £nc4Jii (» Keys) 

I'Hlli fluH&n P„|U| DUKH 
■/Wt.lr SHifl M.fvBUI'l? Em ...ii' 



5.7% 
LA 



* Four 630"hi. and n*o 300 'hf. 
common anoda d lap lay I 

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* 1 15VAC op*fat*on 

* 1«* or 24 riQajr epantion 

* InciwdBS alt compon-riti, caw and wall tr af H*0* m gr 



a tfcn »" k 3-iy*- * 1 » 

JE747 



- ■ r t 



$29.95 



6-Digit Clock Kit 




• Srigftt 300 hi. to mm. caltt 
oda diaplav 

• Ut«MW531i dock chip 

■&*» sierra* *ot riourm, niliBHX 
and hold m-otse* 

• Hf« a«ailv vivwaOl* to 20 1 i 

• Simula t ad walnut c*ta 

• IIS W AC operation 

• 1 2 or 24 hr. operation 
*lncS, flll componanti. cam * 

wall tfa»*icirmei 

• Sir* 6% J a 3 1/8" « M." 



DESIGNERS* SERIES 
Blank Desk-Top Electronic Enclosures 




JE701 ... ,.$19.95 



Regulated Power Supply 



UiOl LM309K. Hdai &ink 
provided. PC boafd con- -* 
flructJon. ProviOe* a solid *"■ 
t amp @ 5 wo lis. Can tupply up 
10 -.5V, tflV and * 12V with 
J £205 Adipter, Inqluda^ compo- 
nenls, hardware and m si ructions. 

JE200........ 91495 





ADAPTER BOARD 
—Adapts to JE200- 
t5V, ."9Vand -:12V 



DC/DC converter with +5V input. Tor ioda I hi- 
sp*wd switching XF MR Short circuit protection. 
PC board construction. Piggy -back 10 J E 200 
board, S**e. 3K" k 2" i 5/ 16 H 



\JE205 



S12.95 



High strength epOAy molded 
tori pftott m mDCJtl brown 
fintth. 

Sliding rejr'bortam pindfor 
icrvics and compiintnt ic- 
uuibility. 

Tap/ bottom panshJBO thk 
ulum, Alailine typa 1200 
finish (gold tint color ] for 
b*it piint idhesittn after 
maditieatioa, 

Vintwi top and oottom 
pands for caaimg etttcitney. 

Rigid curia ruction provides 
unlimited application*. 



CONSTRUCTION^ 

The "DTE" Binnk Desk Top llmronic Enclosurn ire designed 10 blend and complamfinl 
today's modern computer equipment ind can be used in both industrial and home. The 
end pieces art precision moldtd wiih an internal slot (sit wound! to accept both lop ano 
bottom iianeJL The panels are th*n fastsned lo \" thick tabs tnjide Iheend pieces to 
provide maximum rigidity to the enclosure. For case of equipment servicing, the rear/ 
bottom panel slides beck on slotted tracks while trie rest ol the enclosure remains in- 
tact, Different panel widths may he used while ma in la in my a common profile outline. 
Tiie molded end pieces tan ako be painted to match any panel color tchume. 



TRS-80 
16K Conversion Kit 

Expand your 4K TRS 60 Svtiem to 1&K 
K it comae completa wilh I 

*B ea, MW5290<OPDai6/4116l 1€K Pyr>. Rims 1-NSl 

A Pocumantation loi Converiilon 

TRS-16K2 MfiONtt . $49.95 

TRS-16K4 »2»ns S39.95 



ASCII 
Encoded Keyboard Kit 





Eitctoaute 
Modal No 


Paftel 
t¥«lth 


PRICE 


DTE8 


8.00" 


S29.95 


DTL 11 


10.65" 


S32.95 


DTE-U 


14,00" 


$34.35 



Thin JEfitO ASCII Kay board Kit can ba Jntarfacad ■nto 
rnOat any cOmpuinr lyitsm. j^ 9 tit tom#i complata 
wJlh an iftduiH rial gfatSa feavooard twitch assembly 
£61- k evil. lC r t, awrVati. contactor, aiacttoniC comoo 
rtantt and a double *id*0 ormiad i».t».ii*e Uoard Th* 
Hayboard aatamUly reQuiraa *5v 9 IM^A vd 13V 

# t0 rnA lo» operfl4n FeMurart BQ k«Vf taflahralBi t**a 

TS-e s*T»»a«i ##i, up.pa* *nc iovfe* casa ASCII tat Nny 
butferod- Two jptr otlme K«y» provtdact tor cunom 

application! Capa loch 'Or upC**-tetahOnly alpM charge 
i#r*, UrlH/*» * 23 ?6 l40pinl ancoder na-J only marriory 
chip. Output! direct IV compatible wJ;h TTL/DTL ur 

MOS Idq-Ic arrays Eaiv interfacing with a 16-pin t\\p or 
i& pm eupA tDnreciar Si^e- 3>i"H ic 14V.'W a BK"D 

JE610/PTE-AK (*t otttur- e^^ai . S124.95 
JE610 Kit f^£SWfto ,I E^*-. S 79.95 

KG2 6?-K*y Keypoard [Keyooard only} . . .S 34.95 
DTE-AK (Caifr only - J4k"HKir a WxltV'0)$ 49,95 



JE600 

Hexadecimal Encoder Kit 




St 0.00 M.n 
Calff RpwJmit 
PotiaO*-Add 



US f wrtdt Only 
6% Salat Tax 

1 Inui-; 




Spec Shaarls — 254 

Send *"k Post ape lo* yoi>" 

FREE 1961 JAMECO CATALOG 



ameco 



ELECTRONICS 



PHONE 

ORDERS 

WELCOME 

(415) 592 -BOOT 



z,a: 



MAIL ORDER ELECTRONIC S - U'ORLDMDE 

13SS SHOREWAY ROAD, BELMONT. CA 114002 
PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 



*"3* 



FULL B-fllT 
LATCHED OUTPUT 
19-KEV KEYBOARD 



Thi JEoOO Encoder K« twerd 1 Kh OrOnvde* t*VO itvarat* 

haxadeclfntl di^lii praducad IrOm leQueniiai key enrnei 
to allow direct programming for B-bii mitroprQcaiaor 
Or B bit inarpicsry ClTCUlll TlirUa- aOrii HCi"Bl kayiarapro 
'■.-'■Jed 'or uper Dperationi with one h«i/mQ a birlable 
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«¥lth 9 LED leado-ul! Also inc:iuo*d iaakey entry atrotre. 
* aaTurt* full e-b'i iaichea owtcmjt for m r i n n r n r ■ im i 
um TKrajaj user cialiF»«" it»yi with on* 6t»l| bnjlable 
ooerirEiion D*boyn» circuit provided for all 19 «ayi 
9 LEO t a-art rvjtl tO irwnty aH.tr m Ea»y mjetTacinfl wrth 
ir.ndafd 1$pin lC connector Only *5vtJC reouiretl 
rnr oparatiOn Sire. 3^ !- H a B'i W * 8^ U 

JE600/DTE-HK (l » pictured »bi»«i . . .$99,95 



JE600 Kit 



15-Key Henadet- K«ypo«rn 4 

PC Board A Cmpnti. |np tab-* | 



$59.95 



K19 1»-K«y Keyooaro I Key ooard only} SI 4. 95 

DTE-HK (.ufconiy -j«"H>aik H w-aak'*D, $44 r 95 j 



*^ Reader Servtce^see page 146 



73 Magazine * February, 1981 139 




&??!;???•?!!!!? IffffHHHIH!??//. 

*-■** - ! ; I ' < # I ' I ! ! M * * ; f ! • • I • •■ * 



!•■• 



►••«* 



D*»* 



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P«> 
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P-- 



STEP INTO THE PAST WITH THESE 1970 PRICES 

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.1 200 Volt Mylar Cap. 

.01 200 Volt Mylar Cap. 

1469R Voltage Regulator 

.22 10 Volt Disc W/PC Leads 

3.579545 MC Color Burst Crystal 



10/1.00 
12/1.00 

1.00 
20/1.00 

1.00 



74177 BIANARY COUNTER/LATCH 

Divide by 2, 4, 8, 16 
Presettable Input $.60 



21 1 1 By Sprague FM Detector and Limiter 

Full Data $1.25 



MICROWAVE DIODE 

For Down Converters 

5082 - 2835 
$1.50 or 5 For $6.00 



MC 7815 Voltage Regulator House # 

EK 500 Diode 5000 Volt — 250 Ma 

2200 Mfd. 16 Volt Radial Capacitor PC Leads 

10.7 MC Ceramic Filter 

10K 'Mini' Pot With Nylon Shaft 

Midget Audio Transformer 10K/2K Center Tap 



.75* 

4/1.00 
5/1.00 
5/1.00 
4/1.00 
2/1 .00 



MICRO MINI 
TOGGLE SWITCHES 

6 for $5 with hardware 




99$ 

EACH 



SUPER CUSTOM IC #17564-4 

Has a C-MOS oscillator, Decade Counter Decoder/ 
Driver. At the push of a button will flash a LED 24 times 
At the end of which it will display the number of times it 
has gone through the cycle, up to 99 Variable speed 
pulses - Perfect for timing. full DATA — $1 .00 




•+*i 

••I 



Push Button Switch * Normally Closed :::: 

6/$ 1.25 




10 Ohm Button Trim Pot 



4/S1.Q0 



■••< 
■►•••I 

HN 



SWITCH 

Same type as used on 
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$.69 Each DP ST or can 
be arranged SPOT. 

5 For $2*50 



OPCOA CLOCK #R1200 AC 

12 Hour Format. 12 Volt Operation. .3 Inch Display. Has Radio 
(Alarm} Output. Complete with On-Board Switches and 4 Pin 
connection for easy hook up. With Data 

Add 6QHz Ttme Base for DC Operation. 

SUPER SPECIAL 2/8.00 or $4.28 each 

Plug In transformer and all pari* to make clock operational $2.20, 




M3-6501 
256 By 4 CMOS Ram. By Harris Super Low Current Drain' 
Data retention Voltage 2 Volts. Great for battery power or 
back-up 

$1.99 each 



• •mi 

***** 



»*#4 



5 VOLT REED RELAY 

An absolutely fantastic item, Compare this price with any 
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at 10 MA Drops out at 5 MA, 

SUPER SPECIAL! 2/1.20 or 1074,00 



'■*( 



■■ ■•< 



iBf 



P- - 



I* 

Mat 



LAB-BENCH VARIABLE $12 00 KIT 

POWER SUPPLY KIT super sale 
5 to 20 VDC at 1 AMP. Short circuit 

protected by current limit. Uses IC 

regulator and 10 AMP Power 

Darlington Very good regulation and 

low ripple. Kit includes PC Board, all 

parts, large heatsink and shielded 

transformer 50 K/IV. TYP Regulation, 



RCA SENSITIVE 

GATE TRIAC 

TO-5 CASE. HOUSE #40531 

ALSO SAME AS T23000 

2.5 AMPS 400 PIV 



5/$1.19 



Perfect for Dimmers. 
Color Organ*, etc. 
PC LEADS 




SG3501A VOLTAGE REGULATOR 

By Silicon Gereral 

14 Pin Dip, + 15v Regulator - Great for OP Amp 
Supplies - Output Adjustable For ± 10v to ± 23v 
Thermal Shutdown Protected. 

* $.75 Each or 3/$2.00 * 



$4.95 



60 Hz CRYSTAL TIME BASE 

(Complete <\\\ 
Vtm MM5369CM05dwutef iCwiin 
h«gh accuracy 3 5T954S UH7 
Crystal Use win aH MOS Clock 
Chi pi of Modules Draws onfy i S 
MA All pans data and PC Board 
included 100 Hi, same as above 
except *5 95 



D.C. HORN 

VERY LOUD? 

6-12 VDC 

Like Used In 

Smoke Alarms 

FANTASTIC SAVINGS 

Compare this true value. 

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!••« 



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PMD-11K-60 (D«rllnglon) 

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150 Watts. By Lambda b rANO 

$1.50 Ht^ 



■•••< 



Crystal 



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4.433618 MHZ 






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-••at 



TIP 29C Power Transistor 
TO - 220 Case 

1Amp 30Watts 100VoltNPN 
LIMITED QUANTITY 3/$1.25 




Digital Research: Parts 

^ (OF TEXAS) 

PJD. BOX 401247 • GARLAND, TEXAS 75040 • (2141271-2461 

• ■»*••••••*• .■■»*•■••■• 




TERMS: Add 50c postage, we pay balance Orders under $15 add 
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♦rii \i k ' f ■*' ' 



ifiWl 



• NOVICE THEORY TAPES— CT7300— Startling Learning Breakthrough. You'll be astounded at how 
really stmple the theory is when you hear it explained on these tapes. Three tapes of theory and one of 
questions and answers from the latest Novice exams give you the edge you need to breeze through your 
exam. 73 is interested in helping get more amateurs, so we're giving you the complete set of our tapes for 
the incredibly low price of ONLY 515,95.* 

Scientists have proven that you learn faster by listening than by reading because you can play a cassette tape over and over in your spare 
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will be invaluable to you for the rest of your life! Can you afford to take your Novice exam without first listening to these tapes? Set of 
4— S 15,95/ 

SPECIAL OFFER! BOTH NOVICE CLASS STUDY GUIDE AND 
NOVICE THEORY TAPES $20.00 ORDER NP7300. 



HANDBOOKS FOR THE HAMS HACK 



*e*> 



1 • WORLD REPEATER ATLAS— BK731 5— Completely updated, over 230 pages of repeater listings are 
■ indexed by location and frequency. More than 50 maps pinpoint 2000 repeater locations throughout the 
USA. Foreign listings include Europe, the Middle East, South American and Africa, $4.95. 



• THE PRACTICAL HANDBOOK OF AMATEUR RADIO FM REPEATERS— BK1 185— by Bill Pasternak WA6ITF (author of 73 Magazines 
monthly column "Looking West") This is the book for the VRRUHF FMer, compiled from material submitted by over a hundred individu- 
als, clubs, organizations and equipment manufacturers. A "must have" for your ham shack shell, $9.95. 

• WORLD RADIO TV HANDBOOK 1981, 35TH EDITION— BK1 184— This book is the bible of international broadcasters, providing the on- 
ly authoritative source of exact information about broadcasting and TV stations world wide. This 1981 edition is completely revised, giv- 
ing comprehensive coverage of short, medium and long wave, 560 pages of vital aspects of world listening. $16.50. 



3 NEW BOOKS! 




OTHER STUDY GUIDES 



• ADVANCED CLASS LICENSE STUDY GUIDE- SG 1081 - Ready 10 upgrade your 
license? To prevent retaking the FCC theory e*am, you need the 73 Advanced theory 
guide. SSB. antenna theory, transmitters, and electronics measuring techniques are 
covered in detait in this easy lo- follow study guide. Special modes and techniques, 
such as RTTY. are also treated An engineering degree is nol necessary to master the 
Advanced theory— try this boo* before visiting the examiner $ office! $695." (Pub- 
lished by TAB Books previous to recent changes in FCC exam material.) 



• EXTRA CLASS LICENSE STUDY GUIOE-SG 1080— Before going tor your 1 x 2 call, it 
pays to be a master of the Extra class electronics theory, This study guide is the logical 
e* tens f on of the 73 theory course. All the theory necessary to pass the exam is pre- 
sented. Antennas, transmission fines, swrare discussed, as we if as noise, propagation, 
and specialized communication techniques This booh is not a classroom lecture or 
memor Nation guide, but rather a logical presentation of the maienal thai must be un- 
derstood before attempting the Extra exam. Save yourself a return trip to the FCC and 
try I he 73 method first! S5.S5/ 



-UNDERSTANDING AND PROGRAMMING MICROCOMPUTERS -BK7382 —A valuable addition to your computing library. This two-part text includes the best articles that have 
appeared in 73 and Ki lobaud M icrocornputing magazines on the hardware and software aspects ol microcomputing. Well-known authors and weii-strucl ured text helps the reader 
gel Involved Si 095" 

•40 COMPUTER GAMES— BK 7381 —Forty games in all m nine different categories Games for large and small systems, and even a section on calculator games. Many versions of 
BASIC used and a wide vanely of systems represented. A must tor the serious computer gamesman S7,95* 

•SOME OF THE BEST FROM KILOBAUD/MICROCOMPUTING — 6K7311 — A collection of ifiebest articles that have recently appeared in Kilobaud/ MICROCOMPUTING, included is 
material on the TRS^O and PET systems. CP^M, the 8Q80/8Q8S/ZB0 chips, The ASR-33 terminal. Data base management, word processing, text editors and file structures are covered too. 
Programming techniques and Hardcore hardware construction projects for modems, high speed cassette interfaces and TVTs are also included in (his targe formal, 200 plus page edi- 
tion $1095.' 

• HOBBY COMPUTERS ARE HERE! - BK7322 - If you want lo come up to speed on how computers work . hardware and software. . .this is an excellent book. It starts with fun- 
damentals and explains the circuits, and the basics of programming, along with a couple of TVT construction projects. ASCll-Saudot. etc, This book has the highest recommen- 
dations as a teaching aid. $4.95* 

■THE NEW HOBBY COMPUTERS -BK7340-Thls book takes it from whore 'HOBBY COMPUTERS ARE HERE!" leaves off, with chapters on Large Scale Integration, hew to 
choose a microprocessor chip, an Introduction to programming, low cost I/O for a computer, compuler arithmetic, checking memory boards . . . and much, much morel Don't miss 
mis Tremendous value! Only $4,95.* 

'Use the order card «n the back of this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to, 73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH 03458, Be sure 

to include check or detailed credit card information, No CO.D. orders accepted Add $1.00 handling charge. Note; Prices subject to change on books not published by 

73 Magazine. Questions regarding your order? Please write to Customer Service at the above address. Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. 



FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 



?3 TEC^NICaI libRARy 



• BEHIND THE DIAL— BK7307-By Bob Grove. Ge! more fun out 
of shortwave listening with this interesting guide to receivers, 
antennas, frequencies and interference. $4.95.* 

• THE CHALLENGE OF 160— BK7309— is the newest book in the 
73 technical library, dedicated to 160 meter operating. Si Dunn pro- 
vides all necessary information to get started on this unique band. 
The alMmportant antenna and ground systems are described in 
detail. The introduction contains interesting photos of Stew 
Perry's (the King of ISO) shack. This reference is a must for new 
and experienced "Top Band" operators. Price: $4,95." 

• 1C OP-AMP COOKBOOK— BK1028— by Walter G Jung. Covers 
not only the basic theory of the IC op amp in great detail, but also 
Includes over 250 practical circuit applications, liberally il- 
lustrated. 592 pages, 5Vt x 8V* t softbound. $12.95/ 

• THE POWER SUPPLY HANDBOOK— BK7305— Need a power supply for a gadget youVe building? In the POWER SUPPLY HAND* 

BOOK there are dozens ready-to-build. plus detailed steps for designing your own, There are circuits and parts lists for alt kinds of 
supplies, ranging from simple DC types to highly stable regulated versions. If you need a circuit to convert a DC voltage to a higher or 
lower voltage, turn DC into AC T or AC to DC— then this is the book you need. With more than 400 pages, you should be able to find just 
the circuit you need. Without a doubt one of the best power supply source books available, compiled by the editors of 73 $9 95 * 





^^^^ 1 








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THE 


^W^S i-ify .v^«J 



I UVWi.ll 

nuiinilff 




• WEATHER SATELLITE HANDSOOK-BK737Q-5irnple equipment and methods 
lor getting good pictures from the weather satellite Antennas, receivers, mo*iito#s, 
facsimile you can build, tracking automatic control tyoo don't even have to be 
homej. Dr Taggart WB8DQT. %* 95 .* 

• THE NEW RTTY HANDBOOK-6K7347— Is a newedilron and the only up-to-date 
RTTY book available. The stale ol I he art has been changing radically and had made 
all previous RTTY books absolete It has the latest circuits, great far [he newcomer 
and ex perl alike. S5 95 * 

• PROPAGATION WIZARD'S HANDBOOK- BK7302— fry 4. H Nelson. When 
stinspots riddled the worldwide communications networks ol me 1940 s, John Henry 
Nelson rooked to ihe planers lot an answer The result was a theory of propagation 
forecasting based upon interplanetary alignment that made the author the mosi 
reliable forecaster m America loday. The book provides an enlightened look at com 
mimical ions past, present and future, as well as teaching the art of propagation 
forecasting $6.96 * 



• SSB THE MISUNDERSTOOD MODE-BK735t— by James B Wilson Single 
Sideband Transmission thousands of us use it every day, yet it remains one ol tne 
least understood facets of amateur radro J B Wilson presents several methods ot 
sideband generation, amply illustrated with charts and schematics, which will 

enable the ambitious reader lo construct his own sideband generator. A must for the 
technically -serious hams. S5.50 * 

• MASTER HANDBOOK OF HAM RADIO CIRCUITS^ BK 1033^- Th*s is an en^ 
cyclopedia of amateur radio circuits, gleaned from past issues of 73 Ktagazme and 
carefully selected according to application You'll find many you've never seen 
before, some new twists on the tried and true, and several that have been long forgot- 
ten but are well worth remembering. Where your interest ranges from ragchewlng lo 
EME ( from GW to slow-scan TV\ from DX to county nets, this handbook will be a 
welcome addition to your shack $£.95." 




Toots £& 




cS3«B0O* 



-OWNER REPAIR OF RADIO EQUIPMENT-BK7310- Frank Glass K6R0 shares over 
40 years of operating, servicing, and design experience in this book which ranges from 
the elementary to the highly technical written for the top engineers <n the Meld. It is wtit- 
ten in narrative style on the sublets of electronic servicing, how components work, and 
how they are combined to provide communication equipment This hoc* will help ywi 
understand the concepts required to service youf own station equipment. $7,95.* 

• TOOLS & TECHNIQUES FOR ELECTRONICS- BK734fl-by A. A Wicks la an 
easy ^0 understand book written for the beginning kit bunder as well as the ex 
pertenced hobbyist It has numerous pictures and descriptions of the safe and cor- 
rect ways to use basic and specialized toots for electronic projects as well as 
specialized metal working loots and the chemical aids which are used in repair 
shops S4.95.* 

• THE CONTEST COOKBOOK— BK 73136— reveals ine secrets o* the contest win- 
ners (Domestic. OX and specially contests), complete with photos and diagrams of 
equipment used by the top scorers. Find out how to make 150 contacts in one hour. 
$5.95.- 

'Use the order card in the back of this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to: 73 Radio Bookshop ■ Peterborough NH 03458 Be sure 

to include check or detailed credit card m for mat ion No COD. orders accepted Add St .00 handling charge. Note: Prices subject to change on books not published by 

73 Magazine. Questions regarding your order" Please write to Customer Service ai the above address Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. 



FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 



TEST EQUIPMENT 



*HF AND DIGITAL TEST EQUIPMENT YOU CAN BUILD- BKT044 - Rf burst, funrjlran. 
square wave generators, variable length pulse generators - TOO kHz marker. H ami rf 
sweep generators, audio osa aWrf signal injector 1 46 MHz synthesizer, digital readouts 
for counters, several counter, proscaler. microwave meter, etc. 252 pages. $5,95 * 

•VOL. I COMPONENT TESTERS - LB7359 - . . . how to build transistor testers (B)> diode 
testers (3), IC testers 0), vott meters and VTVMs {% ohm meters |fl different kinds*, indue 
lance (3), capacity (91 Q measurement, crystal checking (6). temperature (2*. aural meters 
for the bimd (3t and all sorts of miscellaneous dala on meters using lhem t making 
them more versatile, making standards. Invaluable book. $4.95 " 

•VOL II AUDIO FREQUENCY TESTERS - L0736O- . jam packed with all kinds of 
audio frequency lest equipment If you're into SSB. RTTY, SSTV etc.. this book is a must 
for you a good book for hi-fi addicts and experimenters, too! $4.95 * 

• VOL IV tCTEST EQUIPMENT - LB7362 - Become a troubleshooting wizard! In ihis fourth voiumeof the 
73 TEST EQUIPMENT LIBRARY are 42 home construction projects for building test equipment to work 
with your ham station and In servicing digital equipment Plus a cumulative index tor all tour volumes tot 
Ihe 73 TEST EQUIPMENT LIBRARY. 5495/ 

• VOL Ml RADiO FREQUENCY TESTERS- LB7361 - Radio frequency waves, the common denominator of Amateur Radio. Sue hi (ems as SWR, antenna impedance, line 
impedance, rf output and Held strength, detailed instructions on testing these iiems includes sect ions on signal generators, crystal calibrators, grid dtp oscillators, noise 
generators, dummy loads and much more. $4.95.' 




tIie well-EQuippEd Uam skAck 




• THE MAGIC OF HAM RADIO- BK7312- by Jerrold Swank, 
W8HXR begins with a brief history of amateur radio and of 
Jerry's involvement In it. Part 2 details many of ham radio's 
heroic moments. Hamdom's close ties with ihe continent of An- 
tarctica are Ihe subject of Part 3. In Part 4 the strange and 
humorous sides of ham life get their due. And what of the 
future? Part 5 peers into the crystal balL $4.95* 

• A GUIDE TO HAM RADIO- BK7321 - by Larry Kahaner 
WB2NEL What's Amateur Radio all about? You can learn the 
basics of this fascinating hobby with this excellent beginner's 
guide. It answers the most frequently asked questions in an 
easy-going manner, and it shows the best way to go about get- 
ting an FCC license. A Guide to Ham Radio is an ideal introduc- 
tion to a hobby enjoyed by people around the world. $4,95/ 

• HOW TO BUILD A MICROCOMPUTER -AND REALLY 

UNDERSTAND IT - 8K7325- by Sam Creason. The electronics 
hobbyist who wants to build his own microcomputer system 
now has a practical "How-To" guidebook. This book is a com- 
bination technical manual and programming guide that takes 
the hobbyist step-by-step through the design, construction, 
testing and debugging of a complete microcomputer system. 
Must reading for anyone desiring a true understanding of small 
computer systems. $9,95/ 

• LIBRARY SHELF BOXES -These sturdy white, corrugated, dirt-resistant boxes each hold a full year of 73. Kilobaud Micro- 
computing or 80 Microcomputing, With your order, request self-sticking labels for any of the following: 73, Kilobaud Microcom- 
puting, 80 Microcomputing, CQ f QST t Ham Radio. Personal Computing, Radio Electronics, Interface Age. and Byte. Order 1 — 
BX 1000 -for $2.00*; order 2-7- BX2002- for $1.50 each*; order 8 or more- BX1O02- for $1.25 each'. 



NEW! 




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• GSL CARDS— 73 turns out a fantastic 
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250 Style W-QW0250-for $8.95*; 500 
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11 !/>-/! // 



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• BACK ISSUES— Complete your collec- 
tion; many are prime collectables now, 
classics in the field! A full collection is an 
invaluable compendium of radio and elec- 
tronics knowledge! 

Single back issue— ST0000— 

$3.00"; 

25 our choice— ST2500— $12.00*; 

25 your choice— ST2501 —$25.00*; 

5 your choice- ST0500- $8.75"; 

10 your choice— ST1000 -$14.00." 

• FREE BACK ISSUE CATALOGS are yours 
for the asking . . . specify 73 Magazine and/or 
Kilobaud Microcomputing back issue catalog 
when you send your name and address to us 
on a postcard. 



• Preserve and protect your collection for a lifetime! Order these handsome red binders 
with gold lettering. $7.50 for 1, 3 for $21,75 T 6 for $42.00. (Postpaid within USA, please add 
$2.50 per order outside USA.) Chech or money orders only, no phone or C.O.D. orders 73 
Binders, P.O. Box 5120, Philadelphia, PA 19141. 

"Use the order card in trie back of ihis maga^neor itemize your order on a separata piece of paper and mail to: 73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH 03454. Be sure 

to incluti* check or detailed credit card information. No C OD. orders accepted Add SI. 00 handFing charge Note Prices subject to change on books not published by 

73 Magazme Questions regarding your order? Ptease write to Customer Service at ihe above address Please aNow 4-6 weeks tor delivery. 




MAGAZINE 
BINDERS 



FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 




VHF 



aStennr 






• 73 DIPOLE AND LONG-WIRE ANTENNAS— BK1016— by Edward M. Noil W3FQJ. This is thefirst collection of virtually every type of 
wire antenna used by amateurs. Includes dimensions, configurations, and detailed construction data for 73 different antenna types. 
Appendices describe the construction of noise bridges, line tuners, and data on measuring resonant frequency, velocity factor, and 
swr. $5,50/ 

• THE GIANT BOOK OF AMATEUR RADIO ANTENNAS-With the 
GIANT Book of Amateur Radio Antennas— BKt 104— by your side, 
antennas will become the least of your worries. Over 450 pages of 
design ideas, theory and reference data make this book live up to its 

The cujmt l ^ e " ^ e ^ cna Pt ers cover everything from basic antenna theory 

Of Amateur 801 * through designs for DIY accessories, as well as dozens of antenna 

Radio Antennas designs. Whether planning to build or buy, design or admire, test or 

***** *»*****»■ m enjoy a ham antenna— this is the book for you, From the editors of 

73; published by Tab Books. Hardcover $12.95/ 

• 73 VERTICAL, BEAM AND TRIANGLE ANTENNAS— BK1069— 
by Edward M. Nolf W3FQJ. Describes 73 different antennas for 
amateurs. Each design is the result of the authors own ex- 
periments covering the construction of noise bridges and antenna 
line tuners, as well as methods for measuring resonant frequency, 
velocity factor, and standing wave ratios. 160 paces. $5 50. * 

• VHF ANTENNA HANDBOOK- BK7368— The NEW VHF Antenna 
Handbook details the theory, design and construction of hundreds 
of different VHF and UHF antennas ,,,A practical book written for 
the average amateur who takes joy in building, not full of complex 
formulas for the design engineer. Packed with fabulous antenna 
projects you can build. $5,95,* 

» PRACTICAL ANTENNAS FOR THE RADIO AMATEUR - BK1015 
- A manual describing how to equip a ham station with a suitable 
antenna. A wide range of antenna topics, systems, and acces- 
sories are presented giving the reader some food for thought and 
practical data for construction. Designed to aid the experienced 
ham and novice as well Only $9.95.*" 

• TTL COOKBOOK- BK1063- by Donald Lancaster. Explains 
what TTL is, how it works, and how to use it. Discusses practical 
applications, such as a digital counter and display system, events 
counter, electronic stopwatch, digital voltmeter and a digital tach- 
ometer. $9.50% 

• CMOS COOKBOOK -BK1011- by Don Lancaster. Details the 
appfication of CMOS, the low power logic family suitable for most 
applications presently dominated by TTL. Required reading for 
every serious digital experimenter! $10,50.* 

• TVT COOKBOOK— BK1064— by Don Lancaster. Describes the 
use of a standard television receiver as a microprocessor CRT ter- 
minal. Explains and describes character generation, cursor con- 
trol and interface information \t\ typical, easy-tounderstand Lan- 
caster style. $9.95.* 

• RTL COOKBOOK— BK 1059— by Donald Lancaster. Explains the how and why of RTL (Resistor-Transistor Logic) and gives design 
information that can be put to practical use. Gives a multitude of digital applications ranging from the basic switch to the 
sophisticated counter. 240 pages; $6.50.* 




SSTV 



• SLOW SCAN TELEVISION 
TAPE— CT7350— Prize-winning 
programs from the 73 SSTV 
contest, Excellent for Demol 
$5,95. * 




73 CODE 
TAPES 



Any Four Tapes For SI 5.959 * 
S4.95 Each ! * 



COURSE 




^COOf 



ii 



GENESIS 



it 



5 WPM— CT7305— This is The beginning 
tape for people who do not know the code 
at all It takes them through the 26 letters, 
10 numbers and necessary punctuation, 
complete witn pracitce every step of we 
way usmg the newest bin/ teaching tech- 
niques It is almost miraculous? fn one 
hour many people— including kids ot ten 
— are able to master the code. The ease of 
learning gives confidence to beginners 
who might otherwise drop out. 



"THE STICKLER" 

6+ WPM— CT7306— This fs the practice 
lape to* the Novice and Technician li- 
censes. It is made up ot one solid hour of 
code, sent at the Official FCC standard (no 
other tape we've heard uses these stan- 
dards, so many people flunk the code 
when Ihey are suddenly— under pressure 
—faced with characters sen* at 13 wpm 
and spaced for 5 wpm) This tape is not 
memorable, unlike the zany 5 wpm tape, 
since the code groups are entirely random 
characters sent in groups of five. 



3J cooe course 




"COURAGEOUS" 

20+ WPM— CT7320-Gode is what gets 
you when you go tor the Extra class K- 
cense it is so embarrassing to panic out 
just because you didn't prepare yourself 
with this tape Tnougn this is only one 
word taster, the code groups are so diffi- 
cult that you'll almost fall asleep copying 
the FCC stuff by comparison. Users report 
that they can't believe how easy 20 per 
really Is with this fantastic on© hour tape. 

"OUTRAGEOUS" 

25+ WPM-CT7325— This is the tape for 
that small group of over achieving hams 
who wouldn't be content to simply satisfy 
the code requirements of ihe Extra Ctass 
license. Ms the toughest tape we've got 
and we keep a permanent file of hams who 
have mastered H Lei us know when you're 
up to speed and we'll inscribe your name 
in73'sCW"Hairot Fame'" 



"BACK BREAKER" 

13+ Wpy— CT7313 — Code groups 
again, at a bmk 13 per so you will be at 
ease when you si| down in from of the 
steely-eyed government Inspector and he 
starts sending you plain language at only 
13 per. You need this extra margin to over 
come the panic which is universal in the 
test situations When you've spent your 
money and time to take The test, you'll 
thank heavens you had this pack breaking 
tape. 




jQK COJHsc , 



*Use the order card In the bach of this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece ol paper and moil to: 73 Radio Bookshop ■ Peterborough NH 03458. Be sure 

to Include check or detailed credit card information. No C.O.D. orders accepted. Add $1 00 handling charge. Note: Prices subject to change on books not published by 

73 Magazine, Questions regarding your order? Please write to Customer Service at the above address Please allow 4-3 weeks for delivery 



FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 



OEflLR 

DIRECTORY, 

— -^ ^^ 




PROPAGATION 



San Jose CA 

Buy urea's Q£W%# Amateur Radio ;s tore. New & 
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. in Amateur Radio TeU Guides.. We 
publish tin? meat acvurah' KC.C, exam prraa 
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tush Eo'iitalkwal Servicer 519 EstudiHo 
Aitnins P.O. Buv 2115, San lcandro, CA 

Denver CO 

Eiperimciilrr's paradnr? Electronic and 
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Ros& WB7BYZ, has the Largest Stick of Ama- 
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Terre Haute IN 

Your ham headquarters located in the I wart of 
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The ham state of N.E, you can rdv on. Ken- 
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Phila. PA/Camdcn NJ 

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AMATEUR-REPAIR 

QtiulJty Si tv ice, reasnnahle rutcs, all brand*,. 
Now USA KF3K n-pair center. Amateur Radio 
Repair Center ot lfeC t Inc.. 7S Town Squarr, 
MockrtiuV. VC 270S8. U!**i-3fi2fi. 

Columbia OH 

All inajnr brands featured in I he bi^e^t iiiul 
best ham attire {ur mik» around- Gome in and 
twiAl tiw knobs befntr \xhi buy. I 'ni versa! 
Amateur Radio. Inc.. I2S0 Aida Dr.. RcsnoUv 
hum. (Cedumhusl OH 4306S, ftofi-42fi7/ 

Houston TX 

Eiperunenters paradiw! Elfctitmic and n»e- 
chmrucal eompunenb for cijoiputrr petqtle. 
audio people, hams, robot rniilders, expen- 
inenters. Open .six dav^ u week. Catcwav Eleo 
tmni^ Im\. SU32 Clarliere*t, tiouston TX 
770S3. 97^6575. 

San Antonio TX 

Complete 2 way sen-ice sl>np. Call Dee, 
W r 5i-TiP. Selling Xntenna S|*<dalisLs, Avunii. 
A/ilrti. Bin!. IK-LLain Standard communica' 
bom, Ccna^e. Henry, CushCraf^ Dtdecttic, 
Hurler. ICOM, MF] T Nye* Shutfe, SwaJl/Tcm- 
pu + Ten-Ttc and others. Appliance & Etjttip- 
mrni Co., Inc., 2317 Vance J Acksoti Road. San 
Ajilunio TX 7S213. 734-77H1 

DEALERS 

Your company name and message 
can contain up to 25 words for as lit- 
tle as $150 yearly (preftaid), or $15 
per month (prepaid quarterly). So 
mention oj mail-order business or 
area code permitted. Directory text 
and paymetit must reach us GO days 
in advance oj publication. For ex- 
ample, advertising for tlie April is- 
sue must be in our hands by Febru- 
ary 1st. Mail to 73 Magazine, Peter- 
borough NH 03458. ATTN: Nancy 
Ciampa. 






J r H. Nelson 
4 Plymouth Dr. 
Whiting NJ 08759 





| EASTERN UNITED STATES TO: 




GMT: oo oj o4 us oa m 12 u m » » 22 




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A = Next higher frequency may also be useful 
B = Difficult circuit this period 
F B5 Fair Q = Good F = Poor 

SF = Chance of solar flares 

february 



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73 Magazine • February, 1981 145 



LisT Of AdvERTISERS 



*PS*ase contact these *dwlt$*r5 direclty. 

To receive full Information from our advertisers 
please complete the following postage-paid card. 



RS No 



Pig* 



AEA/Advanced Elect, Applica ., 

11 Iwii ■ ■ t-wum ■■.■■«■ i ifn riiiTr ri i rriii iiii i iiiiiiii*i fc T 

AGL Electronics, Inc 64 

362 A.P. Systems .,..„.„.122 

5 Amateur-Wholesate Electronics 3 

7 American Crystal Supply.^- 123 

Appli &. Equip. Co., Inc ...123 

* Associated Radio...... 81 

10 Avantl Comm..,. TT , *....Bl2 

402 BNF Enterprises..,.. „.. *„„,..,121 

11 Barker & WiHiamsoiu™ ™,J0 

12 Bullet Eleclronics,..,, 136 

391 Butternut Electronics— 8t 

13 Claoa Ql 

■ W VlVWIi m i 1 1 ■ _ i . - _ ii ill m i. _ _ limI a J ■ fc i ■ - . - - - J. h ■ - _ _ H 47 9 

89 Glut t artrae Modular Consoles 80 

382 Comm Concepts. Inc, , 123 

377 Cornmun teal ions Electronics 138 

15 Comm. Specialists ........12. 13 

48*1 Cornel H>uoTiier- , .120 

Crown Micro Products ...,,32, 1 13 

70 Cubic Comm.... 75 

330 Debco Electronics , .. + ..25 

Digital Research Parts... , 140 

80 Microcomputing ^^^^^..^GS 

400 En g \ neerfng Con su 1 1 ing Service.. 1 2 1 

Ertckson Comm. , , 55, 103 

23 Flasher Corp... 81 

323 Fox-Tango Corp „„,..„,..„ ..,,92 

405 General PeripheraJs^^^, 121 

Global Electronics.,. * 123 

393 H.M. Goodwin ^^ «,^ ^121 

352 Grove Enterprises 73 

345 Hal Comm .,..„.,„..„ .17 

31 Hai-Tronix,..,.... ...ro) 

32 Ham Radio Center .. .._ 31 

353 Ham Radio fUtntw ... . HO 



RS. No 



Page 



33 Haimroritcs. NY...^^, .,...131 

481 Hamtronlcs, NY ...30 

34 Henry Radio... .*,.„„ # Govt! 

* irriM q 

■ »mJ\J I VI a..«...i ■■■■■■. ,...■■ ...a... a ... ........ a 4 a ■ a... ^ 

35 Info-Tech. Inc.,..,. ........™„ ...45 

36 intemauonaJ Crystal Mfg. Co., 

Inc , .55 

38 Jameco Electronics............ 138 

39 Jan Crystals ....,81 

40 KLM Electronics,,.^ + , „....*. .♦•25 

Kantronics ,^^^^^^^,^^^,^77 

ttftM^rrtrjimpnting §5 

Kenwood ^^^^...CoviV f 7 

MFJ Enterprises.. PW++ ««„„— + «>J56* 67 



47 
476 
48 
56 



MFJ Enterprises 117 

MHz Electronics... .„„ 126-129 

Macaw ,.-. ...109 

385 MELCO Enterprises. „.„. 93 

*^ MaCT\HlVTt W * i hi h i p.i i>' f i i w.. ii i. i mm Ji W 

45 Madison Electronics. 75 

480 Benjamin Michael Industries 30 

49 Micro Control Specialties 88 

313 Micro Management Systems ....... .24 

50 Mfcrocraft Corp ......93 

Microverter, Inc.-, „...112 

Micro-80. Inc .....123 

Microlog Corp., .20, 21 



39$ 

383 

51 

52 

483 



MidCom Electronics, Inc 44 

JW Miller Oiv. Bail Industries, 30 

318 National Comm. Group CCw~ ~^_71 
54 OK Machine & Tqgj ,,,,., ,,, , ffq 

• Orbtt Magazine......... .92 

404 P.B. Radio Service 93 

P.C. Electronics 88 

348 Page! Elect ronics.. _«*««.. .80 

Paiomar Engineers.. „ 4 ¥ 120 



R,S No 



Pag» 



60 

6t 

479 

381 

397 

62 

401 

• 

65 

64 



367 
306 

68 

399 

403 
477 

76 
37 

m 

311 
373 
90 



Pecos Valley Amateur Radto 

«r-t LJ |b*^(jr ■■■■■Jiii 1 nj.a.Lt.4H I -H ■-■ + ■! 1 U ■ ■ i Hl l lll li M lrt W 

Quest Electronics ...... ,125 

Rad lo Amateur Call book, Inc 75 

naoic ofr^C"-. 4. ^-.„ ....... .. . . — _. 



Radio Systems Tech . Inc.... 121, 123 

Radio World , „ + <5 

Ramsey Electronics 130, 137 

Rogo Computer Products,.., 121 

Sabtron.cs International, Inc 33 

S-F Amateur Radio Services ^..93 

Semiconductors Surplus 132-134 

73 Magazine 

104, 105, 121^141- 144,148 

Signalers f ter s .. „„ „, „. . .. . Tt . ., . 77 

Slep Electronics + .™,92 

Spacecoast Research., 
Specironics ., ^^ 



. _ ._- 



.123 

13S 

.34.35 

.93 



Spec I rum Comm. 
Spencer Products 

Stewart Quads 93 

TEL USA ,.,„.., ,.^117 

Ten-Tec, Inc ...15. 77 

Trac Electron taS^™ 77 



na i i ■ ■■■■it.t.a 



80 
82 
83 
482 



UPi Comm. Systems, tnc_ 

Unlversal Com mjnlcat ions. ..*123 

Vanguard Labs .123 

Van Gorden Engineering 45 

VoCom Products Corp.. ^^^JQ 

Wacom Products. ~_81 

Wawasee E lection Ics... .51-54 

Western Electronics 113 

XtaCorp 121 

Yaesu Electronics Corp..,,. Covtll. 27 
Yaesu Electronics Co#p..........__Jj0 




Books. ETC 



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CT7320 COOE TAPE— 20 + WPM S 4.95 

CT7325 COOETAPE— 25+ WPM. $ 4.9S 

CT7394 CODE TAPES (ANY FOUR ABOVE), . S15.95 

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detailed credit card information or check and mail to: 
73 Magazine/Mail Order Dept. /Peterborough NH 03458. 



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146 73 Magazine • February, 1981 



VAESU 



cA«i-i-*" r * 



1*-«" 



» M VtO i ' ' 



• " /«Sfl 



PLATE 



TUNS 



LOADING 






Hl ^«neiM 



iFi fltfQ 



HF ALL MODE TRANSCEIVER 



POWf W*ltN 



VCHH OF* Off ALC 



MUGS 



MODE 



.— flejECT-^-WlOTW 

I + ° - 



— . fit 



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'■ IB M-MR-H* ^FO EST 



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What's more, the FT-902DM retains these great features of the f 90f ; 



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Variable IF Bandwidth 

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Audio peak CW filter 

IF rejection tuning 

SSB, CW, AM, FM and FSK 



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4 



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RF speech processor 
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Price And Specifications Subject To 
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W 



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The radio. 



YAI1U 

V 



181 



YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP, 6851 Walthafl Way, Paramount, CA 90723 
Eastern Service Ctr., 9812 Princeton-Glendale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45246 



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